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Full text of "Athlete, The"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe196566unse 



/ 





HlqhkhoolAthMe 



BOWLING GREEN HIGH SCHOOL 

BASEBALL TEAM 

K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION-1965 




(Left to Right) Front Row: P. Van Meter, M. Stanley, S. 
Markham, V. Lloyd, G. Guy, Mgr. T. Lynn. Second Row: Coach 
J. Pickens, J. Young, F. Keith, P Allen, W. Gray, D. Freeman, T. 
Oiler, E. Siddens, J. Jones, D. Koon, Coach L, Doughty. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

August, 1965 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACKMEET 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MAY 21-22, 1965 
Owensboro High School Track Team-^K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1965 




, L. fnl,. 
ut, E. Sin 



C. Wnosnam, D. Remole, G. Chumbley, D. Speer, Coach 
M. Pippin, D. Crask, M. Williams, C. Jenninss. 



100 Yard Dash— 

1. Green-Eminence 

2. Brown-Male 

3. Chumbley-Owensboro 

4. Sales-Central 

5. Best-Elizabethtown 

Time— 9.9 

Green tied the old state record of 9.9. 

220 Yard Dash— 



Chumbley-Owensboro 

Brown-Male 

Sales-Central 

Walters-Vallej 

Best-Elizabethtown 



Time— 22.3 



440 Yard Dash— 

1. Green-Eminence 

2. Prather-Lafayettc 

3. Smith-Shawnee 

4. Crask-Owensboro 

5. Potter-Elkhorn Cit.\ 



Time— 49.(' 

Green set a new state record witli hi' 
time of 49.0. 

880 Yard Run— 

1. Roberts- St. Xavie) 

2. Stout-Owensboro 

3. Keller-Lexington Catholii 

4. Coclough-Danville 

5. Remole-Owensboro 

Time— 1:55.3 
Mile Run— 

1. Remole-Owensborf 



2. Stout-Owensboro 

3. Mays-Lafayette 

4. Banks-M.M.L 

5. Green-Newport Catholic 

Time-4:19.0 

Remote set a new state record with his 
time of 4:19.0. 

120 Yard High Hurdles— 

1. Ball-Valley 

2. Johnson-Trinity 

3. Milligan-Somerset 

4. Tolle-Male 

5. Ballowe-Paducah Tilghman 

Time— 14.6 
18S Yard Low Hurdles— 

1. Ball-Valley 

2. Lyons-St. Xaviei 

3. Johnson-Trinity 

4. Kloentrup-Simon Kentoi. 

5. O'Brien-Elizabethtown 

Time-2(l.2 
380 Yard Relay 

1. Owensboii 

2. Valle> 

3. Central 

4. Paris 

5. Lafayette 

Tune— 1:29.3 

the preliminaries set 
ith the time of 1:28.8 



2. l/^favette 

3. Male 

4. Paducah Tilghman 

5. St. Xavier 

Time— 3:22.6 

Owensboro set a new state record with the 
time nf 3:22.6. 

Shot Put— 

1. Marshall-Frankfort 

2. Dickerson-Eastern 

3. Unseld-Seneca 

4. Brim-Male 

5. Cross-Central 

Distance— 57' 7%" 
Pole Vault— 

1. Swope-Daviess County 

2. Fryman-Harrison Countj' 

3. Hagan-Atherton 

4. Lyons-St. Xavier 

5. Pennick-Pleasure Ridge Park 

Height— 13' 0" 



Mile Relay— 

1. Owensbon 



High .lump- 

1 Lance-Eastern 

2. Wright-Central 

3. Kirwin-Atherton 

4. Dinwiddie-Leitchfield 

5. Shaw-Paducah Lincoln 
5. Smith-Fleming County 
5. Penn-Paris 

Height— 6' 2" 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1965 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

1191 East Broadway 
Louisville 4, Kentucky 
July 15, 1965 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Sir: 

We have examined the Statements of Receipts and Dis- 
bursements of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
for the year ended June 30, 1965. Cash in Banks, Savings 
Accounts and Bond Investments were verified by direct 
communication with depositors. Buildings and equipment are 
reflected at estimated values without appraisal by us. 

In our opinion the accompanying statements present fairly 
the financial position of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association at June 30, 1965. and the results of its operation 
for the year then ended, subject to the estimated value of 
buildings and equipment, in conformity with generally accepted 
accounting principles applied en a basis consistent with 
that of the preceeding year. 

Johnson and Lusk 
Certified Public Accountants 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
PERIOD FROM JULY 1. 19^4. TO JUNE 30, 1965 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RIPCEIPTS: 

Balance in checkingr Account July 1, 1964 $ 44.476.29 

Annual Dues: 395 iSj $3.00 $ 1,185.00 

Officials' Dues: 

Football: 504 (5) .$3.00 1,512.00 

Basketball: 1315 @ *3.00 3,945.00 

Reciprocity Officials: 

Football: 55 <n> $1.00 55.00 

Basketball: 37 (rii $1.00 37.00 

Officials' Fines: 30 (S $5.00 150.00 

Redeposits (Bad Checks Made Good) 34.60 

Advertising in Magazine 1,500.00 

Sale of Publications 419.20 

Sale of Equipment 22.50 

Sale of Bonds 2,000.00 

Ticket Sales-Annual Meeting 558.00 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 1,535.00 
Interest Received from 

1st Fed. Savings & Loan Ass'n.__ 300.00 
Interest Received from 

Union Fed. Savings & Loan Ass'n. 400.00 
Interest Received from 
Interest Received from Lexington 

Fed. Savings & Loan Ass'n. 400.00 

Transferred from 

1st Fed. Savings & Loan Ass'n __ 5,000.00 
Transferred from State 

Basketball Tournament Account 148,811.19 

Refunds 271.92 

Receipts — State Baseball Tournament— 1,163.50 

Overoavinent 5.00 

Football Playoffs: 

A & AA Ticket Sales 6,291.00 

AAA Profit 2,372.33 

A & AA Program Prafit 42G.50 

A & AA Program State Tax __ 8.22 

AAA Radio Fee 25.00 

Receipts — State Track Meet 732.50 

Rere-nts — State Wrestling Tournament— 1,110.70 

Receipts — State Swim Meets 799.50 

State Swim Meets — Television Fee 60.00 $181,130.66 

_._ $225,606.95 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 6,850.57 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $12,600.00) 9,815.88 

Expense — Commissioner's Office 486.36 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $10,500.00).- 8,258.04 

Travel Expense — Ass't Commissioner 961.30 

Secretarial Salaries 8,366.37 

Janitor's Salary 1 079.72 

Postage __ ————_.—_— r 2,'662.'30 

Office Supplies 618.33 

New Equipment 987.45 

Janitor Supplies 1 '__'_ joiso 



Insurance 794.95 

Equipment Repairs & Service Contracts 880.65 

Building Repairs 224.19 

Utilities 1,104.78 

Telephone and Telegraph 1.721.85 

Fidelity Bonds 44.00 

Printing 2.977.05 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches Ass'n 500.00 

Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S. 300.00 

Purchase of National Federation Publications 2,887.19 

Delegates to National Federation Meetings 5,585.26 

National Federation Dues 130.00 

Appropriation to Kentucky D.G.W.S. .500.00 

Rental on Films 333.00 

Audit 135.00 

Refunds 5.00 

Bad Checks 37.60 

Miscellaneous Disbursements 300.00 

Meals— Annual Banquet 2,370.75 

Speaker — Annual B<inquet 125.00 

Taxes and Withholdings: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld — $ 4,482.10 

Social Security 1,556.08 

City Income Tax Withheld 524.56 

State Income Tax Withheld 789.15 

Hospitalization Withheld 361.20 

State Sales and Use Taxes 480.43 3,193.52 

Transfer of Funds: 

U. S, Savings 20,000.00 

To Savings Account 5.000.00 25,000.00 

Insurance Subsidy 23,259.70 

Magazine: 

Printing and Engravings 4,925.00 

Mailing 150.00 3,075.00 

Officials' Division: 

Honorariums and Expenses — Clinics 1,479.06 
Printing and Miscellaneous Expense 70.86 

Schools for Officials 1,363.56 

Expenses — Regional Clinics 85.59 

Officials' Emblems 2,133.02 5,132.09 

Swimming: 

State Committee Expense 268.98 

Trophies and Medals (State Meets) 823.57 

Officials (State Meets) 306.62 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meets) 2,145.80 

Pool Rental & Additional Services 262.00 3.806.97 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 1,663.60 

Trophies and Awards 1,684.59 

Miscellaneous Expenses 694.22 4,042.41 

Tennis: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State TonrnamRnts) 1,064.10 

Trophies and Balls 2,182.37 

Expenses — Tournament Managers 216.54 3.463.01 

Track : 

Regional Expenses 687.92 

Tronh'es and Medals 2,064.05 

State Committee Expense 784.22 

Officials 1,093.38 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 8,155.44 

Mis-ellaneo'is Expense (State Meet) 30.00 

New Equipment 32.66 

Labor (State Meet) 49.36 12,897.03 

Baseball : 

Refunds on 

District Tournament Deficits 2.113.01 

Trophies and Awards 2,137.65 

Refunds on Regional 

Tournament Deficits 380.50 

Baseballs (State Tournament) 87.73 

Transportation (State Tournament) 683.30 

Meals (State Tournament) 1,167.00 

Lodging (State Tournament) 840.00 

(ContinuecJ on Page Six) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



AUGUST :1965 



VOL. xxvni— No. 1 



STATE WINNERS IN GIRLS' TENNIS 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 40.501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Kv. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66). Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1963-69). Murray 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek: Don Davis 
(1963-67). independence: Ralph C. Dorsev (1962-66). Horse 
Cave: Sherman Gi.sh (1963-67). Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1963-69). Danville: Oran C. Teater (1964-68). Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

^iom the L'Omnilsslone'i s CJffice 

Football Clinics 

The 1965 clinics for football officials and coaches 
will be conducted by Athletic Director Edgar McNabb, 
Assistant Principal of tJie Beechwood High School. 
South Fort Mitchell. Mr. McNabb has been the 
K.H.S.A.A. representative on the National Federation 
Football Committee for several years. The dates and 
sites of the clinics are as follows; August 9, Henry 
Clay Hotel, Ashland, 7:30 P.M.; August 10, 
Prestonsburg High School, 7; 30 P.M.; August 11, 
Hazard High School, 1:30 P.M.; August 11, Bell High 
School, Pineville, 7:30 P.M.; August 16, Reservoir Hill, 
Rec. Center, Bowling Green, 7:30 P.M.; August 17, 
Mayfield High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 18, Henderson 
High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 22, Newport High 
School, 2:30 P.M.; August 24, University High School, 
Lexington, 7:30 P.M.; August 25, Kentucky Hotel, 
Louisville, 7:30 P.M. 

Registrafion of Officials 

Football and basketball officials previously regL'- 
tered have received their renewal application cards for 
the 1965-67 school year. One hundred forty-two officials 
failed to file their 1964-65 reports on or before the dead- 
line set by the Board of Control for the submitting of 
reports, and it was necessary to impose fines on these 
officials who failed to comply with Association rules. 
It is an Association requirement that each registered 
official attend the clinic in the sport in which he is 
registered. Eleven football officials and forty basketball 
officials were suspended in 1964-65 for failure to attend 
clinics. 

Attention, Principals! 

Each principal of a K.H.S.A.A. member school will 
be supplied during the forthcoming school year with a 
card which will say: "Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association — This will introduce (name of principal), 
(name of school)." The card will be signed by the 
Commissioner. The issuing of the card has been re- 
quested by the Board of Control. Most administrators 
of Association member schools admit to their home 
contests fellow administrators as a mattei of school 
policy. However, manj times these visitors hesitate tf 
identify themselves to the ticket takers. Th( card men 
tioned will assist in this identification 

The identification card may be used for admission t( 
all events at the stal( le\-el e.xcepi the State Kasketbai. 
Tournament. A differeni plan ioi is.sumg tlif'S( passo 
along with passes to the district and regional basket 
ball tournaments, is provided in basketball tournamen! 
regulations. 

The identification cards ai( not to be considered at 
regular season passes tu all home games of eacl 
member school holding membership in the Association 
School policy should be the determining factoi in pr( 
senting the cai'ds foi admission tfi the game.'- 




(Left to Right) Nancy Evans and Bernadette Gephart, state 
doubles championship team of Presentation Academy. (Inset) 
Debbie Simmons of Sacred Heart, state singles champion. 

Football Districts and Regions 

The football districts and regions for 
1965, determined by the K.H.S.A.A. Board 
of Control, are as follows : 

Class AAA 
REGION I 
Atherton. Bishop David, Central, DeSales, duPont 
Manual, Flaget, Male, Shawnee, St. Xavier, Trinity 

REGION II 
District 1— 

Butler. Fairdale, Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, 
Valley, Western 
District 2— 

Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Seneca, Thomas 
Jefferson, Waggener, Westport 

Class AA 
REGION I 
District 1— 

Bowling Green, Caldwell, County .Christian County, 
Franklin-Simpson, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Paducah 
District 2— 

Daviess County, Henderson, Henderson County, 
Madisonville, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Union 
County 

REGION II 
District 1— 

Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Franklin County, Henry 
County, Kentucl^y Militai-y Institute, LaRue County, 
North Hardin, Oldham County, St. Joseph, Shelby 
Countj- 
District 2— 

Bourbon C'ountj , Bryan Station, Clark County, 
Danvilk , Dunbai (Le.xingtonl, Harrison County, Henrj' 
Clay, Jessamine- County, Lafayette, Madison, Madison 
Central, Shelliv\ille, Somerset, Woodford County 

REGION III 
District 1- 

Boone ( uuiil.\ Campbell County. Dixie Heights, 
HigWnndi- Holiiiis New poll. Newport Catholic 
District 2— 

Ashland, Boj(( Counlj , Fleming Count}", Louisa. 
McKell, Kacelanri Rowan County. Russell 

REGION IV 
District 1— 

Bell County, Corhui Cumberland. Evarts. Knox 
Central. Middlesborc- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Page Three 



District 2— 

Belfry, Hazard, Jenkins, Leslie County, M. C. 
Napier, Prestonsburg, Whitesbsurg 
Class A 

REGtON I 
District 1— 

Crittenden County, Fort Campbell, Fulton, Fulton 
County, Murray, Russellville, Trigg County, Warren 
County 
District 2— 

Campbellsville, Cumberland County, Glasgow, 
Greensburg, Metcalfe County, Tompkinsville 

REGION 11 
District 1— 

Bardstown, Eminence, Lebanon, Lincoln Institute, 
Louisville Country Day, Old Kentucky Home, 
Shepherdsville, Springfield 
District 2 — 

Anderson, Boyle County, Burgin, Frankfort, Gar- 
rard County, Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, 
Sayre, Stanford 

REGION III 
District 1— 

Beechwood, Bellevue, CarroUton, Dayton, Lloyd 
Memorial, Ludlow, Owen County 
District 2— 

Bath County, Falmouth, Irvine, Millersburg Mili- 
tary Institute, Mt. Sterling, Nicholas County, Paris 

REGION IV 
District 1— 

Barbourville, East Main, Hall, Harlan, Hazel 
Green, Lily, London, Loyall, Lynn Camp, Mt. Vernon, 
PineviUe, Wallins, Williamsburg 
District 2— 

Catlettsburg, Elkhorn City, Fleming-Neon, Morgan 
County, Paintsville, Pikeville, Wheelwright, Wurtland 



STATE CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 



OWENSBORO GIRLS' GOLF TEAM IS BEST 




(Left to Rieht) S. Ford, M. Germain, D. Germain, L. Reynolds. 
(Inset) K. Beard, Campbellsville, individual champion. 

The first K.H.S.A.A. State Golf Tournament for 
Girls was held at the Shawnee Golf Course, LouisvUle, 
on June 1-2. The Tournament was won by the Owens- 
boro High School team with a score of 766. Kaye Beard 
of the Campbellsville High School was individual 
winner, with a score of 161. The tournament was man- 
aged by DGWS Golf Chairman Matilda Walker of the 
Westport High School faculty. 

Seven full teams competed in the tournament, hav- 
ing qualified in regional competition. These teams and 
their scores were: Owensboro, 766; Frankfort, 775; 
Lafayette, 840; Bowling Green, 870; Eastern, 927; 




(Left to Riffht) J. Davis, H. Johnston, state doubles champion- 
ship team of the Louisville Country Day High School. (Inset) 
T. Wade, Lafayette, state singles champion. 

Westport, 978; PaintsviUe, 1109. 

Individual scores of some of the tournament leaders 
were: 

161 — Kaye Beard (Campbellsville) 

168 — Dot Germain (Owensboro) 

172 — Barbara Ann Brown (St. Catherine) 

179— Patty Baxter (Campbellsville) 

180— Diane Dailey (Frankfort) 

185— Linda Wilson (Valley) 

186 — Carolyn Rose (Eastern) 

188 — Janie Long (Frankfort) 

194 — Shirley Ford (Owensboro) 

195— Patti Tackett (Frankfort) 

196 — Linda Reynolds (Owensboro) 

197— Janice Sue Carter (Tompkinsville) 

202— Martha Marsh (Clark County) 

203 — Pam Dickerson (Bowling Green), Mary Lynn 
Martin (Clark County) 

204 — Nancy Orr (Bowling Green) 

205— Marsha Bird (Lafayette) 

206— Jill Essig (Westport), Martha PhiUips (Lafay- 
ette) 

207— Barbara Cardinali (Lafayette) 

208 — iVIargie Germain (Owensboro) 

209— Ann Titsworth (Murray) 

212— Connie Wood (Frankfort) 

222— Cathy Lear (Lafayette) 

224— Rita Yerkes (Westport) 

225— Gage Heyburn (Waggener) 

226— Cathy Stone (Hopkinsville) , Judy Van Metre 
(Hopkinsville) 

BASKETBALL HALL OF FAME SCORE BOARD 
$100 Contributions and Pledges 



Allen County- 


Dayton 


Morgan County 


Bishop David 


Durrett 


Owensboro 


Bloomfield 


Ezel 


Pikeville 


Bourbon County 


Harlan 


Pleasure Ridge Park 


Breathitt 


Hazard 


Reidland 


Canes^ille 


Log-an Co. A. A. 


Rowan County 


Carr Creek 


Mason County 


St. Mary-of-the-Woods 


Caverna 


Midway 


Sayre 


Daviess County 


M. M. I. 


Tompkinsville 


ContribuHons Less Than $100 


Beechwood 


Holmes 


Prichard 


Calhoun 


Knott County 


Pulaski County 


Campbell County 


Livingston Central 


Shppville 


Campbellsville 


Monticello 


Somerset 


Central 


Nancy 


Valley 


Fergiison 


Paintsville 


Wayne County 


Henry Clay 







Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST. 1965 



The Flying Dutchman 




Until a note arrived from the Commis- 
sioner's office saying, "Dutchman, your 
column is due," the realization had not 
dawned that it's almost pigskin time in 
Kentucky again. 

The summer went fast for your Dutch 
reporter as he had three major parks and 
two new golf courses to get ready for public 
usage. Remember Emmett Goranflo who 
used to coach at Eastern High and Joe 
Goodman, Fairdale High Coach? Both of 
these chaps worked in Jefferson County's 
recreation program as did Coach Dallas 
Arnold, Red Garrison and Harold Craig of 
Valley ; Larry Castle, Thomas Jefferson and 
Coach Andrews of Westport. The Dutchman 
couldn't get the big summer park and recre- 
ation job done without coaches. 

Mel Eppinger of Freedom Hall called 
lasit week to invite the Dutchman to be the 
speaker at an honor dinner for Joe Reibel 
who coached Kentucky's All Stars to two 
victories over Indiana this summer. The 
Sportsman's Club sponsored the Coach Joe 
Reibel night and did a fine job. Carl 
Schmidt, widely known Kentuckian, is the 
president and is assisted by such outstand- 
ing leaders as "Slick" Royalty, Father 
Hornung, Ed Kallay and Johnnie 'Tong. 

One of these days somebody should have 
an honor steak dinner for this chap, John 
Tong. John gets the first Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor of the new sports year for his finan- 
cial and service contribution to the Kentucky 
Society For Crippled Children. 

This fellow, Tong, is one of the best 
men on a sports public address system this 
Dutchman has ever heard and he has 
handled some "big deals." He will be re- 
membered as the man at the "mike" at the 
Louisville Invitational Tournament as well 
as the seventh regional basketball tourna- 
ment last year. Some fellows know how to 
handle the "mike" as it should be and John 




«**> 




JOHN TONG 

Tong is one of them. Coach Ed Diddle's 
status symbol is a towel, John's is a lemon. 

With the opening of the football season 
all sports-minded Kentuckians are reminded 
that they are the people who make the pro- 
grams of The Flying Dutchman succeed or 
fail. Coaches, players and spectators are 
advised of the recognitions they may bring 
to deserving people by their recommenda- 
tions. 

(1) Corn Cob Pipe of Honor goes to 
those rendering unselfish service to others. 

(2) Abou Ben Adhem award is for 
schools or communities who promote good 
neighbor relations at athletic events. 

(3) The Lionheart award goes to a boy 
or girl who is overcoming a physical handi- 
cap to play normally like their more fortu- 
nate friends. From the winners of the 
Lionheart citations emanates the Game Guy 
of the Year. 

To get a citation in any of the three 
categories simply address a letter to The 
Flying Dutchman, Jeffersontown, telling 
him why your recommendation is made. If 
an award is confei-red, it is mentioned in 
this column. Everybody likes a "place in 
the sun," and your interest may bring some 
happiness to others. 

Right now Lexington is getting ready 
to play host to the late summer all-star 
games and the training schools for football 
and basketball officials. These schools for 
mechanics, sponsored by the K.H.S.A.A., are 
open to the public and have caused greater 
uniformity to come to officiating in Ken- 
tucky. 

Here's a closing thought: The surest 
way to get a job done is to give it to a busy 
man. He'll have his secretary do it. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Page Five 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 

June 9-10. 1965 

Bowling Green (3j 





Bowbng Green (4) 




Middlesboro (1) 
AsWand (3) 


Ashland (3) 


Bowlm 






Heath (0) 





Hancock Co. (0) 



Fern Creek (2) 



Highlands (8) 



Fern Creek (4) 



Madison Central (2) 



Highlands (3) 



Bowling Green 
Champion 



Fern Creek (0) 



Thirty-Second Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, June 4-5, 1965 
SINGLES 



Wade-Lafayette 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Wade 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Wade 

4-6; 6-3; 6-3 




Bye 
Roberts-FIaget 


Roberts 
6-3; 6-1 


FINALS 


Miller 
6^; fr-l 


Wade 


Leach-Butler 


Bergquist 
6-1; 5-7; 6^ 


4-6; 6-3; 64 


Bergquist-Country Day 


Nolan 
6-4; 64 


Carter-Hopkinsville 


Miller 

6-3; 3-6; 64 


Miller-Atherton 


Bolton 
&-3; 7-5 


Griffith-BeUevue 
Bolton-Henry Clay 


Bolton 
6-3; 7-5 


VVells-Fort Knox 


Curtis 

4-6; 6-0; 6-2 


Curtis-Eastern 


Nolan 

4-6; 6-2; 6-0 


Ditty-Ashland 


Nolan 
6-3; 6-1 


Durham-Foundation 

Nolan-Aquinas 

Gauspohl-Bellevue 




Gauspohl 








Bye 







Wade 

6-3; 4-6; 6-1 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



St. Xavier 



MadisonvUe 



ShelbyviUe 



Louisville Country Day 



Greensburg 
Highlands 



DOUBLES 



SEMI- 
FINALS 



St. Xavier 
8-6; 64 



ShelbyviUe 
6-3; 6-2 



Louisville Country Day 
6-2; 6-1 



Highlands 



i 6-0; 6-1 

I 



FINALS 



St. Xavier 
&4; 6-3 



Louisville Country Day 
8-6; 7-5 



Louisville Country Day 
6-3; 6-4 



AUDIT . . . 

(Continued from Page One) 

Ticket Sellers & Takers 

(State Tournament) 70.00 

Pablic Address Announcers 50.00 

Scorer (State Tournament) 25.00 

Umpires (State Tournament) 454.64 

Expenses — Ass't Manager 

(State Tournament) 90.90 

Groundsmen (State Tournament) 57.00 8,156.73 

Retirement Fund 12,500.00 

Cross Country : 

Itfileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 681.70 

Trophies and Awards 951.00 

Expenses — Regional Meets 20.10 

Expenses — State Meets 45.00 1,697.80 

Football Playoffs: 

Printing 77.36 

Trophies and Awards 1,147.93 

Transportation 600.50 

Lodging 847.00 

Meals 1,084.00 

Field Rental — Refund on Labor „ 25.00 

Officials 320.00 

Ticket Sellers, Takers, & Guards 284.00 

Miscellaneous 58.16 

Regional Deficits 92.84 

P. A. Announcer & Scoreboard _. 30.00 

Insurance 71.00 

Footballs 108.16 

Statisticians 199.85 

Incidental Expenses — Board Grant 800.00 

Towel Service 15.00 

Press Box Expenses 10.00 

Trainers 20.00 5,790.80 

Rifle Marksmanship : 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 418.20 

Trophies and Awards 57.74 

Officials (State Tournament) 118.00 593.94 

Wrestling: 

Expenses — State Committee 155.91 

Trophies and Awards 

(State Tournament) 123.79 

Officials (State Tournament) 220.00 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 894.20 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

(State Tournament) 453.87 1,847.77 

Total Disbursements $182,549.66 

Receipts $225,606.95 

Disbursements 182,549.66 

Cash Balance $ 43,057.29 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 30, 1965 $ 43,876.13 

Less Outstanding Checks 

No. 650 $ 40.00 

No. 922 35.25 

No. 955 18.00 

No. 1041 72.00 



No. 1049 60.00 

No. 1051 25.50 

No. 1113 19.80 

No. 1126 36.15 

No. 1187 30.10 

No. 1189 152.46 

No. 1190 131.64 

No. 1191 197.94 818.84 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1965 $ 43,057.29 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance — First Security 

National Bank & Trust Co $ 43,057.29 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

(Value June 30, 1965) 88,529.00 

Savings Account — 1st Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Savings Account — Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n . 10,000.00 

Savings Account — Lexington Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 



Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1965 $161,586.29 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. 
Building and Equipment $100,405.40 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEM'^NTS 
1965 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales 5188,394.50 

Profit on Program 4,762.32 

Radio and T. V. Fees 4,340.00 

Redeposits 358.00 $197,854.82 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing $ 1.198.72 

Trophies and Awards 504.61 

Postage 200.00 

Insurance 1,651.64 

Incidental Expenses — (16) Teams 8,000.00 

Transportation 1,580.20 

Lodging 4.519.87 

Meals 5,745.70 

Coliseum Rental 9,000.00 

Organist 80.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1,776.82 

Scorers and Timers 480.00 

Shot Chart Keepers & Statisticians 240.00 

Ushers 2,600.00 

Ticket Sellers, Takers & Guards 3,477.99 

Public Address Announcers 195.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 55.28 

Towel Service 80.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses — Tournament Mgr. 88.00 

FUms 350.00 

Honorariums & Expenses — 

Ass't Tour. Mgrs. 1,304.08 

Bad Checks 358.00 

State Sales Tax 5,557.72 $ 49.043.63 

Transfer of Funds — Amount Transferred to 

K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit $148,811.19 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Page Seven 



ST. XAVIER GOLF TEAM WINS 




(Left to Right) P. Schultz, D. Albers, T. Kalbfleish, M. 
Zimmerer, (Inset) Smith, Owensboro, individual champion. 



The St. Xavier High School won the 1965 State 
High School Golf Tournament, held at the Seneca Golf 
Course, Louisville, on June 1-2. The St. Xavier tecun 
was pushed into a sudden-death playoff by defending 



titlist Frankfort before winnnig the team trophy. The 
Tigers got three pars on the etxra hole to Frankfort's 
two. Scores of the leading teams were: St. Xavier, 630 
Frankfort, 630; Flaget, 636; Owensboro, 646 
Lafayette, 653; Waggener, 657; Franklin Simpson, 666 
Clark County, 666; Fairview, 669; iVIayfield, 670. The 
tournament was managed by Ath. Dir. John W. Hackett 
of the Fort Knox High School. 

Eernie Smith of the Owensboro Hig'h School cap- 
tured individual honors with a score of 148. Individual 
scores of some of the other tournament leaders were 
as iOUows: 

150— Moore (Berea) 

151— Cadle (Middlesboro), Schultz (St. Xavier) 

152 — PuUiam (Frankfort), Douglass (Waggener), 
Dellay (Henry Clay) 

154— Kalbfleisch (St. Xavier), Steers (Franklin- 
Simpson), Davis (Henry Clay) 

156— Kordes (Flaget), Just (Flaget), Cambron 
(Flaget), Downey (Franklin-Simpson), Magee (Mays- 
ville), Dutschke (Elizabethtown) 

157— Bale (Frankfort), Tinnett (North Hardin) 

158 — James (Lafayette) 

159— McParland (Frankfort), HoUenburg (Atherton) 



Sixth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament For Girls 

Central Park, Louisville, June 4-5, 1965 



Simmons-Sacred Heart 
Bye 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Simmons 


SINGLES 

SEMI- 
FINALS 

Simmons 
6-0; 6-0 




c Hargan 
6-3; 6-3 


FINALS 


Vance-Elizabethtown Cathoh 


Metzroth 
M; 6-1 




Hargan-Waggener 
Barker-Franklin County 




Cost 
6-3; 6-4 


Simmons 
W); 6-0 


Murphy 
0-6; 6-2; 6-2 


Cost-Hopkinsville 


Metzroth 


Faddis-Newport 


Wells 
&4; 7-5 




6-1; 6-0 


Metzroth-Presentation 




Gartner-Bowling Green 
Hale-Ashland 

McNamara-Elizabethtown C 
Wells-Murray 
Petty-Waggener 
Murphy-Breckinridge Trg. 
Whitten-Franklin County 
Speagle-Uoyd Memorial 


Gartner 
6-0; 6-3 


ath. Wells 

6-1; 6-1 


Murphy 
3-6; 6-2; 6-3 


Murphy 
6-0; 6-0 




Speagle 
6-3; 6-3 


^ 











Simmons 
6-0; 6-0 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Presentation 



Ashland 



Hopkinsville 



Somerset 



Westport 



CampbeUsville 



Bowling Green 



Bellevue 



TENNIS DOUBLES— GIRLS 



SEMI- 
FINALS 



Presentation 
(forfeit) 



Somerset 
6-1; 6-2 



WestDort 
6-1; i-6; 64 



Bellevue 
6-1; 6-1 



Presentation 
fr-3; fr4 



Westport 
6-1; 3-6; 7-5 



Presentation 
6-2; 6-1 



K.H.S.A.A. TRACK MEET 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
Broad Jump — 

1. Brown-IVIale 

2. Pope-Eastern 

3. Coleman-Male 

4. Rogers-Bardstown 

5. CoOinsworth-Ashland 

Distance — 23' SV2" 

Brown set a new state record with his 
distance of 23' 6M:". 

Discus — 

1. Reidinger-Newport 

2. Marshall-Frankfort 

3. Bouggess-Shawnee 

4. Bryan-iVIale 

5. Block-Trinity 

Distance— 154' 5V2" 



TOTAL POINTS 

Owensboro SO'/j 

Male 28y2 

Valley 21 

Lafayette 17 

Central 16 

:>t. Xavier 15 

Eastern 14 

Eminence 12 

Frankfort 10 

Trinity 8 

Daviess County 6 

Newport 6 

Shawnee 6 

Atherton 6 

Paducah Tilghman 5 

Paris 4 1/3 



Harrison County 4 

Seneca 3 

Lexington Catholic 3 

Somerset 3 

Elizabethtown 3 

Danville ■ 2 

Simon Kenton 2 

Leitchfield 2 

M. M. 1 2 

Bardstown 2 

Ashland 1 

Pleasure Ridge Park 1 

Elkhorn City 1 

Newport Catholic 1 

Fleming County 1/3 

Paducah Lincoln 1/3 



Schools' Ratings on 
Basketball Officials 

The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. dnring 1964-1965. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Adams. William M., 1-1-3-0: Adkins, Jessie J., 6-1-1-0; 
Adkins. Wendell L., 6-4-0-0 : Akridge, Dean, 0-12-3-0 ; Alexander, 
Claudis L.. 0-1-1-0 ; Alexander, Darryl, 4-3-0-0 ; Alexander, 
Howard S . 4-5-3-1 ; Alexander, Rex, 14-17-1-0 ; Allen, Doug, 
0-10-0-1; Allen. Harry Gordon, 1-1-0-0; Allen, James D.. 3-0-0-0; 
Allen. J. Mack. 0-1-0-0; Allen, Lowry R., 18-22-4-2; Allen. 
Nelson R., 18-8-4-2 ; Anders, Raleigh. 2-0-4-1 ; Anderson. Don, 
O-2-0-O : Arbuckle, Kenneth. 1-5-1-3 ; Ausmus,. William. 2-5-0-1 ; 

Babbage. Don R., 0-1-1-1 ; Bailey, Frank. 0-0-0-1 ; Baird, 
Bill. 1-3-1-0: Baker, Robert M., Jr., 4-7-0-0; Baker. Roger K., 
1-0-0-0 ; Ballaban, Thomas, 8-3-1-0 ; Bankemper, Thomas, 0-4-0-1 ; 
Barker. Walter D., 7-7-1-1 ; Basham. Millis Ray. 0-0-1-0 ; Bates, 
Gardner, Jr.. 8-3-1-2; BeU, Clarence T., 4-12-4-3; Benedict, 
Johnny, 1-0-0-0; Bennett, Gene, 5-5-1-1; Bennett. Robert K., 
25-18-3-0; Benzinger. Joseph. 6-11-2-0; Bero. James J.. 0-2-0-0; 
Bern-. William. 3-0-0-0; Bibb. William C.. 3-6-1-0; Bishop, 
Heulyn, 15-5-4-2 ; Bivens. Donald C, 0-0-0-1 ; Bivins, George W., 
0-4-0-1 ; Blackburn, Adrian, 5-1-1-0 ; Bland, Kenneth E., 0-2-2-0 ; 
Blankenship, Zeb, 3-1-0-0 ; Blanton, Bob, 1-0-0-0 ; Blevins. 
Boone, Jr.. 8-3-0-1 ; Bowling, Roy, 4-7-0-0 ; Bowman, E. G.. 
5-2-1-2; Boyd. Jerry A.. 0-3-0-0; Boyles, Paul E., 20-22-9-6; 
Bradford, Earl Edsel, 2-2-0-0 ; Bradshaw, Bill, 2-9-4-2 ; Brad- 
shaw, Frank, 2-1-0-0 ; Brann, Howard E.. 0-4-3-0 ; Brashear, Ley 
Ray, 16-23-5-2 ; Brizendine, Vic, 13-24-4-4 ; Broaddus, William 
D., 0-1-0-0 : Brock, John H., 4-5-0-1 ; Brown, Adron L., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Brown, Billy C. 0-7-4-0 ; Brown, E. C 11-26-1-2 ; Brown, J. 
Carlton. 5-7-3-0 : Brown, John W., 22-21-2-1 ; B.-own, Paul D., 
2-2-2-1 ; Browning, Earl E., 7-17-4-2 ; Brummett. Joseph W.. 
8-10-1-0; Bruner. Jack C. 33-14-0-0; Buis. Nathaniel. 16-28-2-2; 
Bullock. Teddy, 0-0-1-0; Bunn, Harold, 1-0-0-0; Bunnell. Kenneth 
L., 0-0-0-1 ; Burchett. Lanier, 6-10-1-3 ; Burke, Harry R., 



22-14-1-0 ; Burkhart, James G., 1-2-0-0 ; Burris, John F., 0-2-0-0 ; 
Butcher, Douglas, 10-7-1-3 ; Butdher, Granville, 9-10-3-1 ; 
Butler, Donald A., 0-2-0-0 ; Butler, Jack K., 1-0-0-0 ; Butler, 
Robert, 2-3-E-O ; Butner, Billy M., 8-16-7-3 ; 

Cain, Ron, 12-12-8-2 ; Caldwell, Jamei 
Donald Lynn, 0-1-1-0 : Callahan, Thomas, 
Robert W., 0-1-1-0 ; Campbell, George H.. 



;, 9-11-1-1 ; Calitri, 
2-8-0-2 ; Callighan, 
0-3-0-0 ; Campbell, 



John, Jr., 12-9-0-0 ; Canaday, Jacy Glenn, 3-1-0-0 ; Canady, Ray 
B., 5-13-0-2 ; Canter, John N., 1-6-3-1 : Cantrell, Hubert E.. 
1-12-2-0: Caple, Harold, 9-12-5-4; Carlberg, John H.. 2-5-0-0; 
Carr, Billy W., 0-5-0-0 ; Carr, Martin. L., 4-3-3-0 ; Carroll. Joe 
E., 1-4-1-0 ; Carter, Dauton O., Jr., 2-1-0-0 ; Cartwright, 
James F., 1-1-0-0 ; Cai-uso, Dick, 0-1-0-0 ; Cash. Randall E., 
3-1-0-0; Cassady, Charles W., 0-13-2-2; Castle, Jack, T. 8-3-0-0; 
Chandler. Melvin. 9-10-2-3 ; Chaney. Bobby L.. 5-8-2-1 ; Chaney, 
Rex, 3-5-0-0; Chinn, Mike, 2-3-0-0; Cisco, Robert N., 3-15-3-0: 
Clardy Barry D.. 0-0-1-0 ; Clark. Owen B., 3-0-2-1 ; Clark. Tom 
(Lebanon). 9-25-1-2: Clark. Tom A.. (Russell Springs). 3-6-2-0; 
Clater, James F.. 2-5-1-0 : Claycomb. Eddie. 0-16-1-0 ; Claypool, 
Thomas Wayne. 0-1-1-0 : Clemmons, Sam, 0-2-1-0 : Click, Bobby 

ck, Edgle. 4-0-1-1; Cobb, Mike, 1-5-5-0; Cole, 
Coleman, Daniel L.. 1-12-2-3: Coleman. C. 
Collier. Burnard. 2-2-0-0 ; Collins. Hubert, 

, Larry. 1-5-1-1 ; Combs. Eugene W.. 8-5-6-1 : 

1 Delano. 15-10-2-1 : Combs, John, 0-8-1-1 ; 

A.. 3-19-3-2 ; Condra. Kenneth P.. 1-2-1-0 : 
:-3-l-0 ; Conley, George, 4-1-0-1 : Conley, 
Lester Art, 3-1-0-0 ; Conley, Ted L., 5-25-3-1 : Conn, John D., 
4-8-1-5: Cooksey, Marvin, 0-5-3-1: Cooper, John F., 0-1-1-1: 
Cooper, Warren, 9-1-0-0 ; Copley, Sidney M., 1-5-1-0 ; Cornelison, 
Walter, 0-1-0-0 : Cornett, John M., 14-11-2-3 : Costigan, 
Jimmie, 0-1-0-0 ; Cowles, Harold, 0-1-0-0 ; Cox, Alva J., 0-5-1-0 ; 
Cox, Rufus A.. 7-12-0-2 : Craft. Bill. 14-8-2-3 ; Crager, Bobby 
F., 8-7-4-3 : Craig, Randy, 0-0-1-0 ; Crawford, Donald R., 
9-19-2-2; Creamer, Tom, 0-2-0-0: Creech, Robert L., 0-1-0-1: 
Creekmore, Ken, 1-3-0-0 ; Critz, George A., 0-1-0-0 ; Crocetti, 
Dom, 1-2-0-0: Croft, Lewis E., 7-16-5-1; Gulp, Ronald D., 
4-4-2-0: Gulp, Willard E., 0-0-3-0: Cummins, Al, 6-12-9-2: 
Cummins, Ray E., 0-14-2-0; Cunningham, Julian R.. 9-6-2-1: 
Curtis. Douglas E.. 1-0-0-1 : 

Dame. L. J.. 6-18-4-5 ; Daniel. Roger T., 0-2-0-0 : Daniels, 
Bob, 8-6-1-1 ; Dann, Nick, 1-4-1-0 : Daughtery, Elwood, 2-4-3-0 ; 



Joe, 1-0-0-0; CI 


Dickie, 


4-4-0-1 : 


Ronald, 


0-1-0-0 


5-27-3-1 


; Collins 


Combs, 


Frankli 


Combs, 


K<-ith 


Conley, 


Elzie, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Page Xine 



Daum. Charles, 0-1-0-0 : Davenport, Bowman, 5-6-3-0 ; Daven- 
port, Robert B., 0-2-0-0 : Davis, Charles, 0-0-1-0 ; Davis, Harold 
T., 2-17-3-3: Davis, Ralph C, (Ironton, Ohio), 0-1-0-0: Davis, 
Ralph E., (Vanceburg), 17-20-2-6; Dawson, Buck, 1-0-0-0: Day, 
Bill E., 6-11-3-4: Day, Jackie L.. 0-1-0-0 ;Decker, Bernard G., 
0-1-2-3 : Decker, Dennis Lee, 0-2-0-0 : DeGroote. James A., 
3-0-0-0 : DelConte, Arthur J., 4-5-2-0 : Denham, Ronald. 3-15- 
3-2; Denney, Murrell C, 0-1-0-0: Dennison, James E., 0-1-0-0; 
Derrickson, Richard, 4-6-0-5 : DeVai-y. Bill. 6-12-2-1 : Dickson, 
Tom, 0-2-0-0 : Dieterle, Owen M.. 3-0-1-0 : Dills, Bernie 1-1-1-0 ; 
Dingus, Charles, 4-1-0-1 : Disken. Jim, 1-10-0-0 : Divine, Wayne, 
5-3-0-0 : Dixie. Cornelius. 0-7-1-2 : Dobson, Kenneth, 0-19-9-2 : 
Dorsey. James. 9-19-2-2 : Downey. Jim, 2-15-8-2 : Downing, David 
M , 0-0-1-1 : Drahman. Thomas, 2-13-0-0 : Drake. Richard R., 
16-34-1-2: Driskell, Earl, Jr.. 11-14-3-0: Driver, Bobby D., 
0-2-0-0 : Duerson, William Robert, 9-17-2-1 : Duff, Birchell, 
24-17-10-11: Duff. Earl, 14-26-11-1: Dunaway. Adrian, 1-1-0-1; 
Duncan, J. Henry, Jr.. 2-1-3-0 ; Duncan, Robert R., 0-1-1-1 : 
Duncan, Terry T., 0-3-1-1 : Duncil. Charles W., 1-19-4-1 ; Dur- 
bin. Hade, Jr., 0-0-1-1; Duvall, Thomas Jay, Sr., 13-18-3-3; 
Dykes Larry, 1-1-0-0; 

Eades. Jimmie, 10-35-3-2 : EasOridge, Bobby. 0-2-1-0 ; 
Edwards, Don A., 18-33-3-0 : Edwards, Jimmy, 0-0-1-0 ; Elling- 
ton, James E., 5-13-11-3; Elliott, Carroll L.. 35-37-7-2: Elliott, 
Eric William. 0-2-0-0 : Elliott, Humphrey T., 1-11-2-0 : Ellis, 
Johnny, 0-2-0-0 ; Elmore, Jimmy A., 1-3-0-0 : Ernst. Edward R., 
3-4-1-1 : Evans, Elmo Wade, 1-1-0-0 ; Everett, Billy N., 1-3-4-1 : 

Fannin. Benny, 2-2-1-0 : Parish, Merlin J., 7-6-9-0 : Farlee, 
Harold, 4-7-5-0 : Farmer, Jack, 6-13-1-0 : Farmer, Ralph L., 
0-5-0-2 : Feher. AI, 2-13-2-1 ; Feix. Al, 1-1-0-0 ; Fenton. Don. 1-1- 
0-0 : Ferrell. Doc, 21-6-1-1 : Finley. Albert R.. 1-18-5-2 : Finley, 
Ronald N.. 10-18-5-5 ; Fiske. Charles N.. 1-3-1-0 : Flynn, Bobby, 
29-28-6-4 : Fort, John W.. 3-0-0-0 : Foster, Berryman E.. 3-3-0-2 : 
Foster, Bob, 52-25-0-1 : Fowler, Charles. 1-3-2-1 : Fraley, Bill. 
0-4-1-1 : Francis. Bill Gordon, 0-0-1-0 : Francis, Fred L.. 5-3-5-0 ; 
Frazier. Glenn O., 0-2-0-0 : Frazier. Roy D., 0-1-1-0 : Fredericks, 
Rex. 3-6-1-0 ; Freese, Oliver, 2-2-0-1 : Freppon, Thomas E., 
0-1-0-0 ; Frisby, J. R., 4-3-3-1 : Fritz. Sherman. 36-32-2-1 ; Frye. 
Gilbert L., 8-22-2-0 ; Fryrear, David W., 1-3-0-1 : Fugate, E. 
Hugh, 2-3-1-2 : Fulkerson. James R.. 0-2-1-0 ; Fuller. John R., 
Jr., 4-13-7-2; Furgerson, William W., 0-14-0-1; 

Gabbard. John B., 0-3-1-3 : Gaither, Gene. 9-16-3-4 : Galuk, 
Walter M.. 3-4-1-0 ; Galyen, Douglas E.. 0-4-2-0 : Gardner, 
Howard, 7-9-0-0 : Geiser. Robert. 0-4-0-0 : Gentile, Robert Mi- 
chael, 0-2-0-0 : Gentry, Bobby Gene. 0-1-0-0 : Gettler, John D., 
7-14-8-1 : Gibson. Carl. 1-2-0-1 : Gilbert. Gerald L.. 33-35-1-3 : 
Gilbert Lawrence, 3-15-0-0 : Gill, Joe, 3-4-0-0 : Oilman, Ronald, 
1-2-1-1 : Giordano, Al, 0-12-4-1 : Golden, Billy Joe, 49-25-3-0 : 
Goley. Jim, 11-21-4-0 : Goodall, Walter J., 1-12-1-2 ; Goode, 
Earl A.. 7-19-5-5: Gorence, John P.. 0-0-1-0: Gossett, Jack, 
27-22-2-0 : Gourley, Harold E., 3-7-0-2 ; Cover, David B., 4-6-1-2 ; 
Grace. H. E., Jr.. 14-2-3-0 : Graham. Jim, 4-16-0-1 ; Graham, 
Ronald. 5-8-9-0 ; Graves. Robert L., 0-2-0-0 ; Gray, Raymond, 
3-7-2-0 : Green, Walt. 32-9-4-3 : Greer, Daniel J. I., 1-1-2-1 : 
Grigsby. Pete, Jr., 13-6-0-0; Gumm, Kenneth E.. 2-3-1-0; 
Gustafson, Al, Jr.. 1-2-1-0 : 

Hadden. Newell P., Jr.. 0-4-0-0 : Hagan, Joe, 7-23-2-0 : 
Hagedorn, Thomas. 1-12-1-2 : Hagen, William R.. 2-3-1-0 : Hale, 
James J. 0-1-1-0 ; Hall, Billy Joe, 4-6-3-2 ; Hall, Elvis, 13-17-2-2 ; 
Hall. Jack R.. 10-7-0-0 : Hall. Kenneth, 1-1-0-0 : Hall. Mac, 
0-0-0-1 : Hamblin, Anthony. 0-0-2-0 ; Hamilton, Steve, 1-2-0-0 : 
Hamm, Gerald Allen. 0-12-7-3 : Hamm. Harold D.. 0-1-1-0 : 
Hamm, L. E., 0-7-1-2 ; Hammons. Norman, 14-30-5-1 ; Hampton, 
Wallace Ray, 2-3-2-1 : Hardin, Don G., 5-7-0-0 ; Fardin. William 
R., 5-13-0-0; Hargis. Bob. 4-15-6-3: Harned, Vic. 29-24-6-0: 
Harp, Kenneth. 1-1-0-0: Harper, Bruce D.. 0-1-0-0; Harper, 
Robie, 29-28-0-1 ; Harris. Billv. 5-9-2-1 ; Harrison, John L.. 
4-12-3-0 : Hatfield. Cecil R.. 3-8-0-1 ; Hatfield, Dennis. 1-1-3-3 ; 
Hatler. Donald W., 1-9-1-0: Hatter. Frank, 0-4-3-4; Hattev. 
Jack. 0-9-3-0 ; Hawkins. Will A.. 0-0-1-0 ; Hayden, Samuel J., 
12-17-6-0: Haydon, G. Lloyd. 0-7-6-3: Havnes, William T., 
4-7-2-0 : Hedge, David W.. 1-1-0-0 ; Heitzman. Warren E., 3-4-1-0 ; 
Heldman. John. -Jr., 1-1-0-0 : Hendon, Charles. 0-1-3-0 ; Hendon, 
L. J.. 0-1-1-0 : Hennegan. Michael, 1-0-0-0 ; Herndon, Alton E.. 
0-0-0-3 : Hertzberger, Robert H., 4-6-1-2 ; Henson. Tonv C. 
0-14-7-7: Hewitt. R. T.. 26-28-4-0: H-'cks, Flovd E., 0-3-0-1: 
Fill. Earl F.. 16-11-3-0 : Hines. Douglas J.. 0-9-0-0 : Hinton, 
Henry E.. 4-6-3-1 ; Hobbs, Cha'-les V.. 17-10-3-0 ; Hofstetter, 
Joe. 13-8-0-0: Hogan. Cleo C. Jr.. 1-0-0-0: Hogan. Waymon, 
1-0-0-0; Holeman. Bill R.. 2-1-3-1: Holt. Glenn. 4-7-5-0; Holt, 
Robert E., 6-S-1-0: Holthouser, Ora L.. 2-1-0-1; Holtzclaw, 
James R.. 1-0-1-0 ; Hook, B. B.. Jr., 2-6-0-0 ; Hopkins. Bobby 
L.. 0-3-1-0 ; Horn, Dick. 0-3-2-0 : Horn. Everett. Jr., 2-4-2-0 : 
Horton. John Len. 0-0-1-0: Howard Bruce. L., 7-6-4-0; Howard, 
Carl. 7-13-8-0: Howard. Jimmy D.. 0-8-5-0: Hudson. Oscar, 
0-2-0-0 ; Huff, Cnvdell. 3-4-0-0 ; Hugeins. Jim, 1-2-0-0 : Huiet, 
Fred. 9-7-1-1; Hnghes. Paul P.. 30-12-1-1; Hume, Charles. 
.5-17-4-2 : Hulett. Mack G.. 1-5-3-1 ; Hummer. Irby. 17-22-3-3 : 
Hunlev, Neil P.. 15-17-3-2: Hunt, Jack L.. 4-1-0-0: Huvlev, 
Robert. 0-8-2-1 : Hutchens. .Tim. 0-3-1-1 : Hutchinson. Jack, 
0-2-0-0 ; Huter, James J.. 10-13-5-2 ; Hyatt, Bob. 31-24-0-4 ; 
HylaTid F. D., 4-4-0-0 : 

Tdol, Billy Joe, 9-10-1-1 ; Inman. Briscoe, 13-15-6-0 ; Irwin, 
Charlie 27-20-6-1 ; 

Jackson, Edward. 0-2-0-1 ; Jabnigen, Robert E., 1-3-1-0 : 
James. Gene. .5-7-1-0 ; Jenkins, Claude J., 0-1-1-0 ; Jenkins, 
.Ta-v,e« D.. 6-18-2-0; Jenkins. Kean. 24-21-3-2: Johns. Jerry. 
.i-.5-l-0: Johnson, Ger-y R.. 1-3-0-0: Johnson. Gordon M.. 0-1- 
0-0; Johnson, Harry B., 2-12-3-0: Johnson, Harvey K.. 1-2-1-0; 



Male High Wins Rifle Championship 

Male High School of Louisville won the 1965 State 
Tcurrament sponsored by the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association. This was the fourth year for the 
state championship event. Male had won previously in 
1962 and 1963. Ten teams participated in the tourna- 
jTient. 

The Owensboro High School team was in second 
place, being edged by Male High 1357-1356. Thomas J. 
Barilett of Owensboro was top individual scorer with 
287, followed by Richard Allgood of Male with 282. 

The tournament, which was held at Eastern Ken- 
tucky State College, was managed by Captain Thomas 
W. Arnold, US Army ROTC Detachment, University of 
Kentucky. 

Team and individual scores were as follows: 

Louisville Male (1357) — Allgood, 282; Farmer, 274 
Flener, 273; Shobe, 262; Thompson, 266; 

Owensbo-o (1356) — Neale, 278; Youngman, 274 
Wood. 269; Wells, 248; Bartlett, 287; 

Kentucky Military Institute (1330) — Macauley, 279 
Stark, 269; Stallard, 254; Burke, 261; Conlee, 267; 

Ashland (1326) — H. Gardner, 277; B. Gardner, 
273; Price, 260; Cooley, 254; Griffith, 262; 

Millersburg Military Institute (1281)— Breene, 269 
Jerla. 262; Oaks, 238; Sellers. 261; Wolosin. 251; 

Bryan Station (1256) — Peyton, 261; Salyer. 219 
Fee, 266; Walton, 255; Eden, 255; 

Henry Clay (1221) — McKee, 244; Eades, 236 
Porter, 235; Van Meter, 244; White, 262; 

Frankfort (1070) — Hedges, 220; Lea, 249; Turner. 
183; Garrison, 173; Harp, 245; 

Western (801) — Grace, 223; Bryant, 172; Flynn 
98; Waldridge, 158; Case, 150; 

Oldham County (750) — Jackson, 218; Davis, 211 
Carpenter, 190; Bowlin, 131. 



Johnson, Henry Sig, 0-6-0-1 ; Johnson, Jack D., 2-3-3-0 ; Johnson, 
James M., 19-27-4-1 : Johnson, Jerry Lee, 0-0-3-0 : Johnson, 
Leroy, 0-1-0-0 ; Johnson, Lewis. 1-5-2-0 : Johnson. Ronald L., 
0-2-5-3 : Johnson, Walter, 34-25-8-1 ; Johnson, William Bernard, 
6-9-4-1 : Jones, Carson G., 9-15-0-1 : Jones. Charles Junior, 
1-11-2-2; Jones. Joe S.. 2-0-1-0; Jones, John Howard, 0-1-1-0; 
Jones, Paul. 6-16-3-0 ; 

Kaler. Jerry Don, 1-1-.5-3 ; Keeton, C. E., 4-5-4-2 ; Kelley, 
Victor B., 2-0-0-0 ; Kelly, Charles R., 1-13-6-0 ; Kelly, Robert J., 
Jr.. 0-4-4-1 ; Kensler, Orville A., 3-3-0-0 ; Kessler, Robert H., 
3-1-0-0 ; Kimmel, Jerry, 33-43-3-2 ; King, James A., 26-28-6-2 : 
King, Raymond H.. 3-2-0-0 ; King. Russell. 0-4-0-0 ; Kinney, Hall 
M., 3-6-3-0; Kloufetos, Spiro J.. 3-3-3-3; Knight, Bill, 14-19-3-3; 
Kuhl, Lawrence. 19-12-0-0 : 

Ladd. Ronald E., 0-4-5-0 : Lambert, Il-vin. 1-1-0-0 ; Landolt, 
Gene, 0-4-0-i ; Lanham, Tony 2-2-0-0 : Larsen, George, 3-19-2-1 ; 
Lashbrook, Gene. 3-2-1-0 : Laubheimer, Donald Travis, 44-30-6-1 ; 
Laughterty, Kenneth Ray, 0-1-0-1 ; Lawrence, Alvin L., 0-2-0-1 ; 
Lawson, Leiand, 4-3-0-0 ; Lawson, Rondall. 4-1-0-0 ; Lawson, 
Rondell, 12-5-6-1 : Lay, William B., 2-1-1-0 ; Lee. Rober-t L.. 
10-17-1-3 ; Lehkamp, Kenneth. 1-0-2-0 : LeQuire, Harold M., 
13-11-0-2 ; Lester, J. L., 0-4-2-1 ; List. Frank A., 19-18-2-0 ; 
Little, Bernard, 0-4-1-0 : Lloyd, David, 0-0-1-0 : Long, Bill, 
1-14-5-1 ; Longo, Dick. 1-0-0-1 : Louden. Hubert C. 21-23-4-4 ; 
Loudy, Kenneth. 15-25-3-2 ; Lovely. Hamlet, 1-0-0-0 ; Lowe. 
Gene, 23-18-2-1 ; Lowe, James D., Jr.. 0-1-0-0 : Lucas, Gene T., 
20-23-3-2 ; Lusby. George, 9-8-6-1 ; Lytle, William Price, 6-3-1-1 ; 

McAllister, Jack, 0-1-0-0 ; McAnelly. David F., 10-24-.3-2 ; 
McBride, Donald R. 5-12-2-3 : McBride. William Kenneth, 13-16-4-0 ; 
McCrago. Frank J., 8-15-9-1 ; McCarter, Bobby G., 4-3-0-1 : Mc- 
Clure, William S.. 18-12-4-0; McCowan. Connel, 0-2-0-2: Mc- 
Coy, Havse. 18-16-4-3 : McCubbin, Kent, 0-2-1-0 : McDonald, 
Charles W . 0-7-2-6 ; McGehee. Gordon, 12-27-4-2 : McGlasson, 
Galen. 2-11-2-1: McGlothlin, Leonard D., 0-1-0-1: McGuire, 
Herbert W., 0-4-0-1 ; McKenzie. Robert. 2-4-2-0 ; McKenzie, 
Robert. L.. 6-2-0-0 ; McLane, AI, 29-46-6-1 ; McLean, Gordon. 
17-8-2-1 : McLeod, Robert. 4-5-2-0 ; McNamee. Jack. 0-1-0-0 ; 
McPike. Ray S. Jr.. 1-3-0-1 : McQueary. Rollin, 0-2-0-0 ; 

Madon. Robert L.. 21-16-0-0 ; Maban, Carle E., 24-13-5-0 ; 
Maines, George, 2.5-33-3-4 : Marshall. T. N. 2-0-0-0 ; Martin. 
Delano, 0-1-0-0- : Martin, Sam, Jr.. 1-0-0-0: Mauney. Bill W.. 
6-8-0-0 ; Mav. E. B.. Jr., 26-16-2-0 ; Mayes, Edward. 3-7-1-2 ; 
Maynard. John W., 0-1-0-1 ; Maynard, Lonnie. 0-3-0-0 : Meade, 
Foster. 35-22-11-5- : Means. Hugh W., 0-1-0-0; Meek, Walter 
E.. 3-0-0-1 ; Meeks. Jack. 13-6-4-0 ; Meiman. William A., 0-3-0-0 ; 
Meredith. Denny E.. Jr., 8-21-4-7: Meredith, Thomas C. 0-1-0-0: 
Messer. Vernon. 0-1-0-0; Mefcalf. Earl L.. 17-24-3-0; Metzger, 
Donald R.. 1-0-1-1: Mever. Bud. 1-14-4-11; Mickey. Elbert W.. 
2-2-0-0: Middleton. Johnny. 5-10-2-0: Milhern. Daniel L., 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



7-20-P-l : Miles. Robert J., 0-0-1-0 : Miller. Bob, 21-18-2-3 ; 
Miller, Ferrell. 0-10-3-0: Miller, L. O.. Jr., 15-12-3-0: Miller, 
Ee.x J.. 6-1-0-0 : Miller, Victor L., 0-4-1-0 : Miracle, Ed., 6-8-3-0 : 
Mitchell, James. 3-1-1-0 : Mitchell, Merrill. 1-1-0-0 ; Mitchell. 
William N., 21-28-4-1 : Moll. Francis B., 5-4-0-1 : Monahan, 
Ed. 2-7-0-0 : Montgomery, Gordon D.. 0-1-2-1 : Mooneyhan, 
James H.. 1-6-1-0: Moore, James E. (London I, 0-0-1-1: Moore, 
James E. (Larkslanel, 0-2-1-0: Moore, Robert W., Jr.. 
20-26-12-0 : Moore, Rov, Jr.. 5-9-3-0 : Morris, Wayne, 0-0-1-0 ; 
Morse. Richard K., 21-32-4-1 : Moser, Rudv Clay, 21-27-4-0 : 
Moss, Julian, 1-3-0-1 : Mount. Gary, 4-1-1-0 : Mudd, Ed, 19-12-7-7 : 
Mulligan, J. T., 1-9-3-1 : Murray. William D.. 0-0-2-1 ; Murrell, 
Allen L., 17-34-7-1 : Myers, Charles N., 0-4-0-0 ; 

Napier. Harold, 0-2-0-0 : Nash, Dennis B.. 3-6-2-1 : Neal. 
Gene, 18-28-5-3 : Neal, James. 3-15-2-7 : Nevil, Vernon E., 
4-8-2-1 : Newell. Ollie. 0-4-3-0 : Newman, Bill, 9-10-0-0 : Newsom. 
Lawrence, 4-7-3-4 : Nixon, James W.. 14-33-9-3 ; Noel, John, 
0-4-4-1 : Nord, Ed, 13-15-3-1 : Norwood, Donald V., 0-9-0-1 : 
Norwood. Thomas R., 0-12-2-1 : 

Okruch, Nicholas, 0-0-1-0 : Oldham, John H., 1-0-0-0 : Omer, 
Harold G., 1-1-4-0 : O'Nan, Harold L., 7-9-1-2 : O'Nan, Nor- 
man. 12-13-3-4 : Osborne. Larry Joe, 0-1-0-0 ; Overton, Frank, 
Jr., 2-2-3-0 : Owens, Bruce E., 1-1-0-0 : 

Pack, Donald, 3-8-0-0 : Pack. James W., 43-18-3-0 : Page, 
Richard. 0-1-2-2: Padgett. R. K.. 7-14-0-2: Pardue, Robert E., 
1-2-0-0 : Park, J. M., 4-13-7-2 : Parker, Billy E.. 19-8-1-0 ; Par- 
rott. Lanny L., 21-25-3-1 ; Parsons, Roy, 0-2-0-1 : Paulin. Al, 
2-0-0-0 : Payne, Gayle, 3-3-0-0 : Peay, Curtis E., 5-5-5-1 : Peden, 
Harlan C. 0-5-4-1 : Peecher. W. Lloyd, 0-3-0-1 : Peeno, Harry 
R., 1-2-0-1 : Pelphrey. Jack, 3-0-0-0 : Pence. Charles E., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Pendygraft, Douglas, 1-0-0-0 : Penix, Hobert Ferrell, 5-3-1-0 : 
Penrod. Joe B., 10-13-2-1 : Per-kins, James E., 0-2-0-0 : Perry. 
James. 13-34-5-4 : Petett, Frank M.. 2-10-2-0 : Phelps, Ralph, 
10-10-4-1 : Phelps. Ray. 2-9-5-1 : Phillips, William, 0-1-0-0 : 
Pieratt, Hollie E.. Jr.. 0-2-0-0 ; Pierowski, Paul. 0-1-0-1 : Pike, 
Robert F., 3-4-1-0 : Ping, Denton, 1-2-1-0 ; Pogue. Ivan Gordon, 
10-26-7-3: Points, Charlie, Jr., 2-12-6-2: Poore, Deane. 1-0-2-0; 
Powell. Logan G.. 5-4-1-0; Powers, Samuel P., 1-0-0-0; Prater, 
John R.. 1-1-1-0 : Prater, Rondel R., 0-1-0-0 : Prather, Wilbur, 
9-34-6-3: Priar, Glover. 0-2-0-0; Price, Charles A., 3-11-0-0: 
Price, James E., 5-19-7-0 : 

Radcliff. Paul Douglas, 0-2-0-0 ; Rader. Douglas. 2-2-1-0 : 
Radjunas. Eddie. 1-3-0-0 : Radjunas, Stan, 5-7-4-0 : Rainey, 
James C, 4-11-2-0; Rakel. Bob, 2-3-0-0: Ramey, Herbert Dean, 
1-6-0-0 : Rapp, Bill, 1-3-1-0 : Rawlings, Charles, 3-7-1-0 ; Rawl- 
ings. Harold. 7-12-2-3 ; Ray. Frank, 2-2-1-0 ; Reed, Charles R., 
27-28-6-4 : Reed, Gordon, 21-30-0-0 ; Reed, William F., Sr., 
0-0-1-0 ; Reid, Jack L.. 0-0-1-1 ; Reinhardt, Myron Stanley, 
29-31-2-0 : Rexroat. Jerry L., 8-12-4-1 ; Rhodes, Cecil, 5-10-2-3 ; 
Rice, William, Jr., 0-0-0-1 : Richardson, Charles E.. 15-5-2-0 ; 
Ricketts, Claude O.. 12-17-3-1 ; Riggins, Jason M., 0-2-0-0 ; Riggs, 
Floyd L.. 1-8-1-0 ; Ring, William H.. 17-21-10-11 ; Rison, 
Johnny B., 0-1-1-0 ; Rister, Edgar L., 6-9-6-0 ; Ritter. Goebel, 
13-5-0-0 ; Robertson, William R., 0-10-2-1 : Robinson, Don L., 
1-6-2-1 : Roby. Joseph L., 4-12-3-2 ; Rogers. Tom H., 4-13-1-0 ; 
Roeckers, 3ernie, 2-5-3-2 ; Roesel,, Joseph, 0-2-0-0 ; Rogers, 
Howard D., 25-16-2-1 ; Roller. Otis, 3-5-2-1 ; Rolph. Harold J.. 
0-2-0-0 ; Romer, Dick, 0-1-0-0 ; Rose, Bernard, 1-3-8-1 ; Rose, 
Lee H., 3-4-0-0: Rose. Wally, 7-8-3-1; Rothfuss. Richard, 1-3-3-0; 
Roy, Charles, 0-2-0-1 ; Rubarts, Leland G., 4-11-7-3 ; Rudolph. 
Charles R..4-10-0-0 ; Runyon, Tommy Dean, 1-7-1-1 ; Rush. Rex 
E.. 1-6-0-0; Russell, Allen W., 20-17-3-1; Russell, Eugene, 
0-2-0-0 ; 

Sagers, Robert. :i-2-0-0 ; St. Clair, Bob, Jr., 26-19-0-0: Sal- 
yer. Henry E., 0-0-2-0 ; Sams, Glenn, 1-5-6-1 ; Sanders, Mel. 
10-24-5-3 ; Saylor, Lanny Ross, 1-2-1-0 ; Schad. Jim, 4-4-1-0 ; 
Schlich. Paul E., 3-20-1-1; Scott, Dickie, 1-1-0-0; Scott, 
William E., 0-1-1-0; Scott, W. L., 0-0-1-0; Seavers, Joe, 
1-0-0-1 : Secrest, Eldon, 4-3-3-0 ; Sellier, Edward F., Jr.. 7-8-3-1 ; 
Sellman, John B., .1-3-1-2; Selvy, Curt. 16-12-1-1; Settle. Roy 
G.. 19-23-2-2 : Sexton, Steven C, 0-1-0-0 ; Sharp, Lloyd 8-6-5-2 • 
Shai-tzer, Philip, 3-4-2-1 ; Shaw. Earl, 16-39-5-3 : Shaw, Robert 
S.. 0-4-0-0 : Shelton, Benny R., 0-7-1-2 ; Shewcraft. Clifford W., 
0-2-2-1 ; Shewmaker, Wayne. 6-2-2-1 ; Shope, Lowell M.. 3-3-0-0 ; 
Showalter, John. 2-3-2-0 ; Shuck, Thomas G., 12-17-3-0 : Silli- 
man. Will-am Gerald. 0-1-1-0 ; Singleton. Bobby L.. 2-1-0-0 ; 
Singleton, Ronnie Herman, 1-4-1-1 ; Sizemore. Aster 3-4-2-1 ; 
Slusher, Wayne Cortlan, 2-1-0-0 : Small. William W., Jr. 9-10- 
3-0 : Smith, David W., 0-2-0-0 ; Smith, Edgar J., 7-18-2-1 : Smith 
Roy M., 0-11-0-3 ; Smith. Thomas W., 0-1-0-0 ; Smith, W. Jack, 
56-19-5-3 ; Smith, Wayne N., 26-36-2-4 ; Smith, Willard N , 
30-36-3-5; Smith. William E., 0-4-1-0: Smithson. Richard a'.. 
9-21-4-0 : Solomon, Jim.. 7-23-12-7 : South, William F., 0-1-0-2 ; 
Sparrow. Jim. 1-1-0-0 ; Spaulding, Stan. 15-7-1-0 : Speck, Mike, 
29-45-8-1 : Spencer, Iry, 31-29-3-1 ; Spencer, Pittman, 0-1-0-0 ; Spice- 
land, S. E.. 5-7-3-0 : Spoonamore, Jim. 11-16-8-1, Spradlin, Robert, 
Stephens. Herbert D., 1-1-0-0 ; Stephenson, Harry S., 4-7-0-0 ; 
0-0-0-1 ; Stauffer, Frank, 1-0-0-0 ; Steenken, William R., 2-5-2-1 ; 
Stethen, James E., 0-6-2-0; Stevens, Alex, 12-8-1-1: Stewart, 
James. 2-1-4-0 ; Stewart, Lawrence, Jr., 2-3-1-0 ; Stiff, Maurice, 
31-18-7-6 ; Stikeleather, Clyde L., 10-12-1-0 ; Stines, Ray, 1-6-2-2 ; 
Stinnett, Charles Ray, 0-0-1-0 ; Stinson, Charles L., 2-5-0-0 ; 
Stith, Houston, 20-27-4-3 : Stoess. Henry L., 3-5-1-1 ; Stoess, Bay H., 
0-0-1-0 : Stokes, Bill J., 0-0-1-0 ; Stokes, Bob, 4-14-1-3 ; Strain, 
Richard P.. 14-14-4-2; Strong, Arnett. 66-15-3-5; Sullivan. Don 
Chris, 43-25-4-3 ; Swarts, Joseph, 0-1-0-0 ; Switzer, Richard J.. 
Jr., 1-3-0-2 ; 

Tackett. Layne. 5-0-1-0; Talbott, Jude, 0-0-1-0; Tarlton, 
Thomas O., 8-10-2-4 ; Taylor, Alton, 2-1-0-1 ; Taylor, Billy Joe, 



0-1-0-0 : Taylor, Dennis H.. 2-2-1-2 : Taylor, Ed. 16-23-1-4 ; 
Taylor. Roger E.. 9-12-0-0 : Thomas, Frank M., 0-3-0-2 : Thomas. 
James Edward. 0-2-0-0 ; Thomason, Bennett, 2-5-4-1 ; Thompson. 
Allen Roy, 0-1-0-0 : Thompson. Houston, 0-1-0-0 ; Thompson. 
Jack, 8-25-4-1 ; Thompson, Kenneth E.. 14-6-0-0 ; Thompson, 
Ralph, 2-0-4-0 : Thompson, Thomas A., 14-25-8-3 : Thomson. 
Jerry D., 0-3-2-0 ; Tinsley, Marion F., 13-35-3-2 : Todd. Paul 
H.. 0-0-1-0 : Travis. Tom, 0-2-0-0 ; Triplttt, Herbert W., 24- 
18-6-0 : Trivette. Dale. 1-2-3-0 ; Troutman. Doyle, 5-8-2-1 ; 
Tuck, L. Ochell, 2-1-0-0 ; Tulley, Pat, 10-14-1-1 ; Turner, Aa- 
ron. 4-9-3-1 ; Turner, Bruce, 0-1-0-0 ; Turner. Jimmy, 0-2-0-0 ; 
Tyre. Donald, 4-16-3-0 ; 

Urlage, Richard, 9-15-2-1 ; VanHoose, Edgar N., 5-9-1-1 ; 
Vance, Hunter, Jr., 1-1-0-2 : Vannerson, Duke, 0-1-0-2 ; Van 
Zant, Jim, 11-4-0-0; Vanover, J. W., 0-6-0-0: Vanover, Walter 
S.. 8-8-0-1 ; Van Sickle. John R., 0-1-0-0 : Varble. William E.. 
3-26-1-2 : Vaughan. Jerry Sam, 0-1-0-0 ; Vaughan, Ronald, 
0-2-1-0 ; Vaughn, Melvin, 1-1-0-2 ; Vaughn, Teddy Ray, 0-4-3-2 ; 
Vermillion. Charles D.. 4-7-1-1; Vescovi, Raymond B., 4-10-0-0; 
Vice, Charles G., 0-1-0-0 ; Vincent, Johnny, 6-8-1-0 ; Vipper- 
man. Albert E.. 0-4-1-0 : Voorhis, Kenneth, 0-1-1-0 ; 

Wagner. Marvin Rudy. 16-9-2-0 ; Waide, Harry Doyle, 
3-6-3-1 : Wallace, Theodore, J., 0-0-0-1 ; Wallen, Howard W., 
4-3-1-0 : Waller. Bobbie E., 11-16-2-0 ; Walsh. Bernard N., 
0-2-0-1 ; Walsh. Douglas, 0-1-1-0 ; Walton, Roy. 10-2-2-1 : Ward, 
Jack. 3-15-2-3; Ward. Robert L., 0-1-0-0: Warfield, Jim 1-6-1-0; 
Watkins. Yancey Lee, 2-2-0-0 : Watts, Leon, 1-0-0-0 ; Wearren, 
Wade H., 5-10-2-0 : Weathers, Charles J., 0-0-3-1 ; Weaver, 
Clyde Ivan, 0-1-0-0 ; Weaver, Ray, 2-6-1-4 : Weiner. Dick. 1-6-3-1 ; 
Welch. Bill. 1-0-0-0 : Welch, John H., 3-0-0-1 ; West, James, 1- 
9-3-1 ; Weyer, James G.. 7-9-0-2 ; White, Carl W.. 0-1-0-0 : White, 
David B., 7-14-8-4 : Whitehead, J. R., 0-4-2-1 : Wickham. 
James R.. 11-17-8-2; Wigginton, Al, Sr.. 1-1-0-0; Will. Chuck, 
0-2-2-0 : Williams. Benny D., 0-1-1-0 ; Williams. Jack A., 
6-7-1-1 : Williams, James H., 1-2-2-1 ; Williams. Paul W., 
16-12-0-0: Williams. Roger, 25-18-1-1: Williams. Smyth Jack, 
0-1-0-0 ; Willis, Robert A.. 1-6-3-0 ; Winchester. Roy L.. 23-32- 
4-0 : Winfrey. Shelby, 35-17-5-0 ; Wingfield, Felix G., 5-8-0-2 ; 
Wirtz. Howard A., 9-11-5-6: Wirtz, Leonard F.. 4-2-0-0; Wise. 
Billy v., 35-25-2-3 ; Wise, Jack, 37-18-2-0 ; Withrow, Raymond 
W., 2-0-0-0 ; Wolfe. Paul Allen, 3-0-0-0 : Wood. Kenneth C 
0-1-1-0 : Wood. James Randall, 0-1-2-0 ; Woods, Gene B., 5-19- 
4-2; Woodward, Billy, 13-11-1-0; Woodward, Roy. 0-1-2-1; 
Woosley. Travis, 10-15-6-3 : Woprice, Ronald J., 0-3-0-0 : Wray, 
Robert F.. 0-1-0-1 ; Wright, Billy Joe, 2-6-6-1 ; Wright, H. W., 
Jr., 0-3-0-1- Wright, Paul. 0-1-0-0; Wurtz, Emil, 1-1-0-0; 

Yelton, Gene B., 1-1-0-1 ; Yessin, Humzey, 3-1-2-0 ; Zachery, 
Bobby Gene, 0-0-3-0. 



Hot Weather Hints 

Early fall football practice is frequently conducted 
in very warm and highly humid weather in many 
parts of the United States. Under such conditions, spe- 
cial precautions should be observed. Otherwise, the 
athlete is subject to: (a) heat exhaustion — depletion 
of salt and water due to excessive sweating, (b) heat 
stroke — overheating due to breakdown of the sweating 
mechanism. Either condition can result in serious 
physical harm and even death; both are preventable. 

Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are preventable 
only by careful control of various factors in the condi- 
tioning program of the athlete. Basic, of course, is 
an adequate medical history and medical examination 
prior to participation in practices. With the start of 
practice, it is essential to provide for gradual acclima- 
tion to hot-weather activity. Equally important is the 
need to adjust salt and water intake to weather condi- 
tions. 

As the athlete becomes accustomed to hot weather 
activity, he perspires more freely (and thus dissipates 
body heat) and excretes less salt (and thus conserves 
sodium I. With a graduated training regime, such accli- 
mation can be expected to take place over a period of 
about one week. 

The old idea that water should be withheld from 
athletes during workouts has absolutely no scientific 
foundation. In fact, such restriction, by depleting water 
in the body, can lead to heat exhaustion. During exer- 
cise in the heat, it is essential to replace the water, 
hour by hour, lost by perspiration. Intake at any one 
time, however, should be held to one-half water glass 
or less (2 to 4 ounces). 

Salt also needs to be replaced daily, particularly 
(Continued on Page Fifteen) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Page Eleven 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K.H.S.A.A. 
Member Schools in Basketball, 1964-1965 



Alle 



Co. 



Alvaton 

Anderson Co. 

Annville Inst. _-. 

Aquinas 

Atherton 

Attucks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin-Tracy 

Ballard Memorial 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bath Co. 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell Co. 

Bellevue 

Benton 

Berea 

Betsy Layne 

Bishop Brossart __ 
Bishop David 



nfield 



Bourbon Co. 

Bowling Green 

Boyd Co. 

Boyle Co. 

Bracken Co. 

Breathitt Co. 

Breckinridge County 
Breckinridge Tr. 



Bristow 

Broadhead — 
Bi-yan Station 

Buckhorn 

Burgin 

Burnside 

Bush 



Butler 

Butler Co. 

Caldwell Co. 

Calhoun 

Calloway County 
Campbell Co. __ _ 

Campbellsville 

Caneyville 

Carlisle Co. 

Carr Creek 

Carrollton 

Carter 

Casey Co. 

Catlettsburg 



Centertown 

Central 

Central City 

Chandlers Chapel 

Christian Co. 

Clarkson 

Clay Co. 

Clmton Co. 

College Hi. (Bowling Green) 

Combs Memorial 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden Co. 

Cub Run 

Cuba 



Cumbevla 
Danville 
Daviess ( 
Dawson i 
Davton 

DpRale<; 



id County 



6 





3 


1 


:<. 





6 


1 


11 





7 





1(1 


11 


2 





12 






a 


32 


fl 


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Page TNveh'e 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Drakeeboro 

Diuabar 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

Eajrlineton 

East Main 

Eastern 

East Hardin 

Edmonson County 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic- 

Elkhorn City 

Eminenc^e 

Estill Co. 

Eubank 

Evai-ts 

Ezel 

Fail-dale 

Fail-view 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming Co. 

Fleming-Neon 

Fordsville 

Ft. Campbell 

Ft. Knox 

Foundation 

Frankfort 

Franklin Co. 

Franklin-Simpson 

Frederick Fraize 

Fredericktown 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Fulton Co. 

Gallatin Co. 

Gamaliel 

Garrard Co. 

Garrett 

George Rogers Clark -- 

Georgetown — . 

Glasgow 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant Co. 

Grayson Co. Catholic - 

Greenshurg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Hall 

Hancock Co. 

Harlan 

Harrison Co. 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hazard . 

Hazel Green 

Hazel Green Academy _ 

Heath 

Hellier 

Henderson 

Henderson Co. 

Henderson Settlement _ 

Henry Clay 

Heni-y Co. 

Hickman Co. 

Hight Street 

Highlands 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Holy Name 

Holy Family 

Hopkinsville 

Hoi-se Branch 

Hughes Kirk 

Hustonville 

Inez 

Ii-vine 

Irvington — . 

Jenkins 

Jessamine Co. 

Johns Creek 

Kingdom Come 

Knox Central 

Knott Co. 

Lafayette 

LaRue Co. 

Leatherwood 



14 


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42 


14 








37 


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6 


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5 





20 








53 


12 


2 





44 


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3 





50 


13 


3 


4 


1 


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5 


2 





49 


10 


3 


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14 


3 


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1 





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1 





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8 


1 





49 


8 





19 


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43 


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3 


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3 


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21 


4 


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26 


20 








23 


17 


4 


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6 


4 


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30 


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39 


15 


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38 


15 


1 


1 


36 


15 


2 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Page Thirteen 



Ijebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitchfield 

Leslie Co. 

Letcher 

Lewis Co. 

Lewisbui-g 

Lex. Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Lincoln (Paducah) ^. 

Lincoln Institute 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Livingston Central 

Lloyd Memorial 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

Lyon County 

McCreary Co. 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell 

McKinney . 

M. C. Napier 

Mackville 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Madisonville 

Male 

Martin 

Mason Co. 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Maytown 

Meade Memorial 

Meade Co. 

Memorial f Hardy ville) 

Memorial ( Waynesburg) 
Menifee Co. 



Me 



Co. 



Metcalfe 

Middlesborough 

Millersburg Military Institute 

Model 

Montgomery County 

Monticello 

Morgan Co. 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central 

MuIIins 

Munford ville 

Murray 

Murray College 

Nancy 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas Co. 

North Hardin 

North Marshall 

North Warren 

Oakdale Christian 

Oil Springs 

Old Kentucky Home 

Oldham Co. 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida 



Ov 



Co. 



O wensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owsley Co. 

Paducah Tilghman . 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Paul G. Blazer 

P. L. Dunbar 

Pendleton County _. 

Phelps 

Pikevillp 

Pine Knot 

Pine Mountain 



PI 



■ille 



Ridge Park 
Powell Co. 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard 



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14 


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Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Providence 

Pulaski Co. 

Raceland 

Red Bird 

Reidland 

Riehardsville 

Rivei'side Christian _. 

Riverview 

Rosenwald 

Rowan Co. 

Russell 

Russell Co. 

Russellville 

Sacaramento 

St. Agatha 

St. Aloysius 

St. Augustine 

St. Benedict 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Henry 

St. Joseph Prep. 

St. Joseph 

St. Mary's Academy _ 
St. Marv-of-the-woods 

St. Patrick 

St. Thomas 

St. Vincent 



■ille 



St. Xa 

Saly 

Sandv Hook 

Sayre _. 

Scottsvil 

Scott Co 

Sedalia 



Shawnee 

Shelby Co. .._ 

Shelbyville 

Shepherds ville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove _ 
Simon Kenton 



rset 



Southe 

South Hopkins 

South Marshall _. 
South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Symsonia 

Taylor Co. 

Tavloi-sville 

Temple Hill 

Thomas Jefferson 

Todd County 

Tollesboro 

Tompkinsville 

Trige Co. 

Trimble Co. 

Trinity 

Tyner 

Union Co. 



Uni- 



sity 



Valley 

Van Lear 

Virgie 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Walton-Verona 
Warfield 



Wa 



Co. 



Wayland 

Wayne Co. 

Webster Co. 

West Hardin 

West Hopkins 

Western (Shively) 
Western fSinai) __ 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Whitley Co. 

William Grant 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Winpo 

Wolfe Co. 

Woodford Co. 

Wurtland 



1 8 







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16 I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Page Fifteen 



What Does Athletics Mean to You? 

Editor's Note: The following article is a copy of a 
talk given by Dick Jeffries, Student Body President of 
Millard M. Halter High School at Wellston, Missouri. 
Jeffries, who was also quarterback of the football 
team, was injured in the second game of the season 
and was not able to play again until the last two 
games. One night during his recuperation period, he 
could not sleep so got up and wrote this talk which he 
gave at a subsequent assembly. 



What u'jes athletics mean to you? Does it mean 
going to f.ames to eat hot dogs, to drink soda, or to 
just talk with your friends? Does it not mean enough 
to some of you to even come to the games? Is it too 
much trouble to walk or ride five or ten blocks to our 
football field on Saturday, or to walk five or ten feet 
out of your way to register, in the office for the spec- 
tator bus? Maybe some of you just don't think it at all 
necessary to go to this "trouble" just to see your team 
play, and think it even more ridiculous to be expected 
to cheer or yell at the game. How silly can those 
cheerleaders get? 

I'm afraid these are some of the things that too 
many of the students at Wellston Higih think. In trying 
to comprehend the reason for this feeling, which is 
usually not connected with Wellston, I concluded that 
too many of our students don't understand, don't 
visualize, the true meaning and importance of athletics. 

Athletics to me, as an individual, means trying to 
better myself, my character, and the impression I 
present to other people. 

I'm only seventeen years old, and there are an in- 
finite number of things to do in hfe which I haven't 
done. But I seriously doubt that there will be anything 
more gratifying, more rewarding, than the feeling I 
have when I know, deep down inside, that I put out one 
hundred per cent in a game, that I did my best. My 
goal in athletics is to be able to say cifter each game, 
"You did the best you were capable of doing." 

There is something about athletics that is almost 
sacred; this is the emotional element. 

What makes grown men, mature men, play on and 
on in a game when they have broken bones, pulled and 
torn muscles, bruises and cuts galore, complaining 
only when they are taken out of the game to receive 
medical attention? What makes these same mature 
men cry and weep after losing a hard fought, a well- 
played game? 

What makes a boy weighing only one hundred 
seven pounds beat his brains out against teammates 
twice his size and strength just so he can play football? 

What is it about this game of football that after 
once playing, a person can never forget it, never equal 
the impact it had on his life? 

Athletics doesn't stop at the side lines. This zeal 
penetrates and affects all that it comes in contact with. 

What makes the crowd in the stands scream and 
yell at the top of their voices, cheering a runner across 
the goal line? What makes this same crowd ache all 
over after their team has been handed a defeat? 

There is an unexpressable feeling, a code existing 
to all who have ever participated in sports which can 
only be felt, not expressed by words but by actions 



and feelings. This feeling or code is not only for one 
race, or for one color, or for one religion. It is uni- 
versal, common to all. Athletics has brought men 
together, and by doing so, has given these men an 
opportunity to understand other men, and most impor- 
tant, to understand themselves. 

So you see, fellow students, athletics is not going 
to the game and drinking soda and eating hot dogs or 
talking to your friends. It is making yourself vulner- 
able to the "cohesive binding" which it provides for 
all, young and old, large and small. 

Tho^e of you who have the ability to participate on 
the various "fields" of athletics, do so. These experi- 
ences will be unparalled throughout your life. Those 
of you who don't have this ability have an equally im- 
portant role to follow. It is up to you to support, to 
encourage, never to discourage, non-detrimental athletic 
activities. 

Let us all set a goal higher than just winning, high 
enough to demand our full efforts, and at the same 
time, in the range of our capabilities, strive for this 
goal. 

We owe this to the eminent and illustrious Institu- 
tion of athletics. 

—Missouri H.S. Activities Journal 



HOT WEATHER HINTS 

(Continued from Page Ten) 

during the acclimation period. Extra salting of the 
athlete's food within the bounds of taste wlU accom- 
plish this purpose. Salt tablets, particularly on an 
empty stomach, can be irritating cind may be poorly 
absorbed. Adding one teaspoon of salt to six quarts of 
water used for drink during hot-weather workouts 
offers another approach. 

Even after acclimation it is advisable to fdternate 
periods of strenuous exercise with periods of rest 
during hot weather. Also, it is important for the coaoh 
to observe his athletes carefully for signs of lethargy, 
inattention, stupor, awkwardness, or unusual fatigue. 
Symptoms of water and salt depletion may include 
headache, nausea, hallucinations, and weak and rapid 
pulse. 

The following suggestions are offered to help 
coaches prevent heat exhaustion and heat stroke during 
hot-weather athletic activity: 

1. Require a careful medical history and checkup 
prior to the beginning of practice. 

2. Schedule workouts during cooler morning and 
early evening hours in hot weather. 

3. Acclimate athletes to hot-weather activity by 
carefully graduated practice schedules. 

4. Provide rest periods of 15 to 30 minutes during 
workouts of an hour or more in hot weather. 

5. Supply white clothing (to reflect heat) which is 
loose and comfortable (to permit heat escape) and 
permeable to moisture (to allow heat loss via sweat). 

6. Furnish extra salt and water in recommended 
amounts during hot weather. 

7. Watch athletes carefully for signs of trouble, 
particularly the determined athlete who may not report 
discomfort. 

8. Remember that the temperatiu-e and humidity, 
not the sun, are the important factors. Heat exhaustion 
and heat stroke can occur in the shade. 

National Federation and A.M.A. 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1965 



Some Suggestions For Reducing 
Football Injuries: 

1. Good pre-season conditioning 

2. Proper warm-up before contact work in practice 
or game 

3. Require wearing of proper equipment at all times 

4. Set a limit to the length of practice sessions. 
Most of the serious injuries occur during the 
last half-hour of practice. 



7<4e KUu^xie4i> Go-mpxA^ftdf. 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 255-0837 



N.C.A.A. Amateur Rule 

Recently tlie National CoUegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion Council reaffirmed the following interpretation 
relative to amateurism: 
"Any student who signs or has ever signed a con- 
tract to play professional athletics (whether for a 
money consideration or not) ; plays or has ever play- 
ed on any professional team in any sport; receives or 
has ever received, directly or indirectly, a salary or 
Einy other form of financial assistance (including scho- 
larships or educational grants-in-aid) from a profes- 
sional sports organization or ciny of his expenses for 
reporting to or visiting a professional team no 
longer is eligible for intercollegiate athletics." 
We bring this interpretation to your attention so 
that it may come to the iwtice of high school adminis- 
trators and coaches. It is, we believe, generally 
unknown that a high school graduate who prior to 
coUege enrollment, accepts expense paid trips for the 
purpose of visiting a professional sports organization, 
is no longer eligible for intercollegiate athletics. 

— ^National Federation Bulletin 



Teaching of Gymnastics," "Gymnastics' Basic Seven 
for Girls and Women," "Side Horse Exercises for 
Senior High Neophjftes," "Basic Elements of Gym- 
nastic Composition," and "Checklist for Gymnastic 
Competitions." 

The new Guide has short, carefuUy selected bibli- 
ographies of books and films. Illustrations include both 
line drawings and photographs which demonstrate 
exercises cind techniques. 
144 pp., $1,00 2-9 copies, 10% discount; 10 or more, 20%. 



Gymnastics Guide 

The DGWS Gymnastics Guide 1965-67 is just off tha 
press. Edited by Norma B. Zabka (Hunter College of 
the City University of New York), it contains fifteen 
/aluable articles on teaching, coaching, and officiatiiig, 
as well as official rules and regulations for intramural 
and extramural gymnastics meets and standards for 
girls and women's sports. 

A sampling of topics shows a wide range of cover- 
age in the articles: "The Development of Competent 
Gymnastic Judges," "Class Organization for the 



1965-66 Wrestling Rules Changes 

1. All 'high school modifications have been placed 
in the appropriate rules section of the Guide rather 
than having a separate section for interscholastic 
competition. 

2. The maximum number of points that can be 
earned for time advantage has been increased to two. 

3. Two points shall be scored for all takedowns. 

4. Chicken wing is legal but potentially dangerous 
when defensive wrestler's hand is in front of or to his 
side. The hold becomes illegal when the hand goes 
behind the back constituting twisting hammerlock. 

5. When there is no action in the mat position, the 
responsibility for initiating action rests with both 
wrestlers. 

6. Holding legs (two hands on one leg or two hands 
on two legs) is no longer considered under the stalling 
category and is considered as a technical violation on 
the first infraction. 

7. FuU length tights and shirts are mandatory. 

8. A period of 15 seconds shoJl be sufficient time 
for the referee to decide whether or not a contestant 
in the advantage position, who is retaining a stalling 
hold, has made an attempt to improve his position. 



SUTCUFFE'S IS READY 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic eaulpmetit for the fall season 



No delay — no waiting — immediate delivery! Stock merchandise is 
shipped on the very day an order is received. 

We maintain and operate our own sewing, engraving, and service depart- 
ments, which enables ns to render faster service. 




QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nationally- 
advertised preferred quality brands. 



_ SUTCLIFFE'S SERVICE 

^^V^* \ 1^ ^^^ on-the-spot service, the Sutcliffe School repre- 
sentative will contact you, as usual, during the year, 



Write us about your needs. Remember we give one 
day service. 




THE Sutcliffe CO. 

INCORPORATED 

115 SOUTH 7th STREET., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



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Sturdy, all-aluminum alloy cabinet, fully enclosed with no 
exposed wiring. Non-glare, baked enamel finish. Choice of 
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We carry the Figurgram basketball boards in stock for immed- 
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Motiel Description Lbs. 

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FF-2S — Double Face Tickaway with 9 inch numerals — 250 

FF-2S-1 2— Double Face Tickaway with 12 inch numerals 300 - 

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each team, per pair • .•■• 

EPW FOUL INDICATOR or MATCH SCORE WRESTLING 
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HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

CHapel 7-194! (Incorporated) MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 





HiahSchoolAthMe 



K.H.S.A.A. SCHOOL FOR FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 




Above are area representatives who attended the School for Football Officials, held in 
Lexington on August 6-7. They are: (Left to Right) Front Row— Gordon Reed, Fort Thomas; 
Sam Gruneisen, Louisville; School Director Edgar McNabb, South Fort Mitchell; Charles 
Denton, Henderson; Bernard Johnson, Lexington. Second Row — Kean Jenkins, 
Elizabethtown; E. B. May, Jr., Prestonsburg; Ray Canady, Barbourville; Vic Brizendine, 
Louisville; Bill Mordica, Ashland; Paul Walker, Bowling Green; Joe Treas, Fulton. Robert 
Fallon, who will represent the Hazard area, was not present when the picture was made. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

September, 1 965 



K.H.S.A.A. 
FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

(Adopted by the Board of Control) 
L Classification 

Sec. A. The Board of Control has divided the 
schools into three groups as follows: 

1. Class AAA includes the schools in Jefferson 
Countj' except Louisville Country Day and Kentucky 
Military Institute. 

2. Class AA includes the schools with enrollments 
of 421 or more in grades 10-12. 

3. Class A includes the schools with enrollments of 
less than 421 in grades 10-12. 

Sec. B. The basis for determining the schools of 
Classes AA and A vwll be the total enroUment in 
grades 10-12 of a co-educational school. The Board 
may make an upward enroUment adjustment for a 
school with less than a full high school course, and for 
schools enrolling boys only. 

Sec. C. Classification is for a period of two years. 
Classification for 1965 and 1966 is based on the 1963-64 
enrollment. A school on application of the principal to 
the Commissioner, may be permitted to move from a 
lower into a higher classification. Any school placed in 
a higher classification must remain in this classifica- 
tion until all schools are re-classified. 
IL District and Regional Championships 

Sec. A. The state is divided into two regions for 
Class AAA and four regions each for Classes AA and 
A. Each region may be divided into two districts. 

Sec. B. The championship of a district, or a region, 
if there are no districts, will be determined by the 
Dickinson Rating System, as adopted by the Board of 
Control. In event of a tie under the Dickinson System 
the following plan will be appUed for breaking the 
tie: for winning a game, ten points; for tying a game, 
five points; for each game won by a defeated opponent, 
one point; for each game won by a tied opponent, 
one-half point; for each game tied by a defeated op- 
ponent, one-half point; fore each game tied by a tied 
opponent, one-fourth point. Only games played within 
the region will be counted. If a tie results after a 
team's highest points for four games have been counted, 
an additional game will be counted until the tie is 
broken. 

Sec. C. To qualify for a district or regional cham- 
pionship, a team shall play a minimum of four games 
in its class within the region (Beginning in 1966, only 
games played within the district wiU count in deter- 
mining the winner). In Region II of Class AAA, only 
games played between teams in the district shaJl 
count toward the district championship. 

Sec. D. In any case where two teams have played 
each other more than once, the first game only shall 
countn in the standings. 
IIL Playoffs 

Sec. A. In Qass AAA the district winners wiU play 
on Friday or Saturday two weeks prior to Thanksgiv- 
ing. The regional winners will play the following 
weekend for the chaimpionship. 

Sec. B. In Classes AA and A the district wdnners 
win play on Friday and Saturday two weeks prior to 
Thanksgiving. The following weekend the winners of 
Region 1 and Region 2 will play, and the winners of 
Region 3 and 4 will play. Winners of these games 
(semi-finals) will play for the championship of each 
class the following week. 

Sec. C. If a championship game results in a tied 
score, the teams will be delcared co-champions. 

Sec. D. If a game between district winners or 
regional winners results in a tied score, the following 



point system will determine the winner: 1) one point 
for most penetrations of the opponent's twenty-yard 
line, 2) one point for the greater number of first downs, 
3) one point for the greater net yardage. If the teams 
are still tied after the point system mentioned is ap- 
plied, then the winner will be the team with the greater 
net yardage. The Commissioner will appoint statisti- 
cians for each gamie. 

Sec. E. In Classes AAA and AA the site, date and 
starting time of the game will be determined by the 
winners of the even numbered districts and regions in 
the even numbered years. Odd numbered district and 
regional winners will determine the site, date and 
starting time of the game in odd numbered years. 

In Class A the site, date and starting time of the 
game will be determined by the winner of the odd 
numbered districts and regions in the even numbered 
years. The even numbered district and regional win- 
ners will determine the site, date and starting time of 
the game in odd numbered years. 

The site, date, and starting time of the final game 
in each class wiU be determined by the Board of 
Control. 

Sec. F. Only K.H.S.A.A. approved or certified offi- 
cials shall be used in games between district winners. 
Only certified officials shall be used in all other playoff 
games. All officials shall be assigned and their fees 
set by the Commissioner. 
IV. Finances 

Sec. A. The proceeds of the games, except the 
finals, will be used to defray the expenses of the visit- 
ing team, officials, trophies for the district and region- 
al winners, and other necessary expenses. 

The team transportation allowance shall be 50 (f per 
mile round trip. If no agreement can be reached on 
lodging and meals expenses, actual expenses for these 
items, not to exceed the following ma.ximum, shall be 
allowed: seven meals for 38 persons at $1.50 per meal, 
and two nights lodging for 38 persons at $3.00 each. 
Net profit or loss shall be shared by the competing 
schools. 

Sec. B. A representative of the host school, desig- 
nated by the principal, will manage the game. The 
principals or their representatives shall agree on aU 
matters pertaining to the game; such as admission 
charges, expenses, and allocation of reserved seat 
tickets. Disagreement on any of these items shall be 
referred to the Commissioner, and his decision shall be 
final. 

Sec. C. The proceeds of the final games in each 
class shall accrue to the K.H.S.A.A. after the necessary 
expenses have been paid. Actual expenses, not to 
exceed those given above, shall be paid. A team not 
requiring transportation, meals or lodging shall receive 
a minimum of $100.00 for miscellaneous expenses. 



THE DICKINSON FOOTBALL 
RATING SYSTEM 

(As modified and adopted by the Board of Control) 
Section I 

1. First division includes all teams that have won 
more games than they have lost during the season. 
Others are second division teams. 

2. For each victory of a first division team over a 
first division team the winner gets 30 points and the 
loser 15 points. 

3. For a tie between first division teams each team 
gets 221/2 points. 

4. For each victory of a first division team over 
a second division team the first division team gets 20 
points and the second division team gets 10 points. 

5. For each victory of a second division team over 
a first division team the winner gets 30 points and the 
loser gets 10 points. 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 




Foster J. Sanders 
President 



Preston Holland 
Vice-President 



Foster J. Sanders, Principal of the Louisville Male 
High School and K.H.S.A.A. Board member for the 
past three years, was elected President of the Board 
at the summer meeting of the directors, held on July 
31, 1965. Assistant Superintendent Preston Holland of 
of the Murray City Schools was elected Board Vice- 
President. The two men represent respectively Sections 
4 and 1. 

Foster J. Sanders, son of a Methodist minister, 
was born in Summersville, Kentucky, in Green County, 
on December 12, 1914. A graduate of the Beaver Dam 
High School, he received his A. B. degree from Ken- 
tucky Wesleyan College and his M. A. from the George 
Peabody College. 

From 1936 to 1941 Mr. Sanders coached and taught 
at the Shepherdsville High School. From 1941 to 1943 he 
was a Safety Director for the Gopher Ordnance Works 
at Minneapolis, Minnesota. During 1945^6 Mr. Sanders 
was the Principal of the Shepherdsville High School, 
and during the period of 1946-55 he was a teacher of 
Social Studies at the Western Junior High School in 
Louisville. During the next six years he was Principal 
of the Western Junior High School, and in 1961 he was 
named Principal of the Louisville Male High School. 

In 1936 Foster J. Sanders was listed in "Who's 
Who in Colleges and Universities." In 1955 he was 
awarded a Travel Fellowship by the Ford Foundation, 
but he declined this to accept the principalship of the 
Western Junior High School. He is a member of the 
Kentucky Committee of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, Phi Delta Kappa 
National Educational Fraternity, the Masonic Lodge, 
and the Board of Trustees of the Cooper Memorial 
Methodist Church. 

Mr. Sanders is married to the former Jane McCon- 
nell of Marion, Kentucky, an elementary supervisor 
in the Jefferson County school system. They have two 
children, a daughter, Barbara Longacre, 23, Chemistry 
teacher at Thomas Jefferson High School; and a son, 
Jerry, 20, a senior at the University of Virginia. 

Vice-President Preston HoUand was born in Murray, 
Kentucky. He attended the Murray Grade School and 
High School, graduating in 1924. He received his A. B. 
Degree from Murray State College four years later. 



after having lettered in football, basketball and baseball. 
He has done graduate work at the University of Ken- 
tucky, and he received his M. A. Degree from Murray 
State. 

Mr. Holland was principal and coach at Ahno High 
School for two years following his graduation from 
college, after which he joined the Murray staff as coach 
of football, basketball, baseball, and track. He has 
been at Murray since that time, currently being Ath- 
letic Director and Head Football Coach. He is past- 
president of the Murray State Alumni Association. He 
organized the first Little League in Kentucky, serving 
as State Director for several years. For many years 
he has been an Elder in the First Christian Church of 
Murray. 



Football Examination 

Part II of the National Federation Football Exami- 
nation for officials will be given in Kentucky on Mon- 
day, September 20. An official who has been registered 
for at least one year prior to the current season is 
eligible to take the examination and work for a higher 
rating. Officials who hold the "approved" rating in 
football are required to make a minimum percentage 
grade of 80 in order to maintain this rating from year 
to year. After an official has received the "certified" 
rating, he continues to receive this rating each year 
provided that he attends the clinic for that year and 
has worked in at least six first team high school foot- 
ball games during the previous year. Ehgible officials 
who wish to take the test should write to the State 
Office. 

1965-66 Insurance Subsidy 

As reported in the Board of Control meeting 
minutes which appeared in the May issue of 
the ATHLETE, tlie Board voted in its April meetmg 
that the insurance subsidy of each Kentucky member 
school in 1965-66 shall be the basic amount of $40.00, 
with an additional subsidy of $60.00 for schools main- 
taining football. Principals of all K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools have been mailed reimbursement forms. Some 
of the companies with which Kentucky schools place 
their insurance business give the schools credit for 
the amounts due and bill the Association for these 
amounts. The reimbursement plan and the credit plan 
are both satisfactory. 

Use of Registered Officials 

A list of the registered football officials appears in 
this issue of the ATHLETE. Principals and coaches 
should study the current list to deteiTnine whether or 
not all officials with whom contracts have been signed 
have registered this fall. Supplementary hsts of of- 
ficials will appear in subsequent issues of the maga- 
zine. By-Law 22 provides that member schools shall 
use registered officials in all footbaU and basketball 
games, and that failure to comply with this regulation 
makes the home school liable for suspension. If there 
is any question about registration, the official should 
be asked to present his card. 



page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



SEPTEMBER. 1965 



VOL, XXVIII— No. 2 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 40501 
Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky- 
Editor THEO. A. SANFOKD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Directors— Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Don Davis 
(1963-67). independence; Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse 
Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68), Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



^>iom the 6< 



ommissionei s 



ice 



Basketball Clinics 

The 1965-66 rules meetings for registered basketball 
officials and coaches will be conducted by veteran 
clinic director Charlie Vettiner. The dates and sites 
of the meetings are as follows: 

September 26, Phoenix Hotel, Le.xington, 1:30 P.M. 

September 26. Newport High Scliool, 7:00 P.M. 

September 27, Morehead State College, 1:30 P.M. 

September 27, Paul Blazer High School, Ashland, 
7:00 P.M. 

September 28. Pikeville High School, 1:30 P.M. 

September 28, Hazard High School, 7:00 P.M. 

September 29, Bell County High School, Pineville, 
1:30 P.M. 

September 29, Somerset High School, 7:00 P.M. 

October 3, Beaver Dam High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 3, Daviess County High School, Owensboro, 
7:00 P.M. 

October 4, Paducah Tilghman High School, 1:30 
P.M. 

October 4, Christian County High School, Hopkins- 
ville, 7:00 P.M. 

October 5, W.K.S.C, Bowling Green, 1:30 P.M. 

October 5, Elizabethtown High School, 7:00 P.M. 

October 10, Kentucky Hotel Louisville, 7:00 P.M. 

Attention, Officials ! 

The attention of all registered K.H.S.A.A. football 
and basketball officials is called to By-Law 29, Section 
9, which provides that the official shall be supplied 
with an emblem which he shall wear on his shirt or 
sweater. This rule will be enforced strictly in 1965-66 
as it has been in recent years. The emblem is to be 
worn on the left shoulder shirt sleeve, approximately 
one and one-half inches below the shoulder seam. The 
"approved" or "certified" bar should be worn below 
the emblem. Failure to wear the emblem will make an 
official liable for suspension from the Officials' Division 
of the Association. 

Recommended uniforms are as follows: 

Football — black and white striped shirt (long or 
short sleeves), black baseball cap with white piping, 
white knee pants, black belt, black stockings, black 
shoes and laces; 

Basketball — black and white striped shirt (short 
sleeves, long sleeves by special permission), black 
trousers, black belt, black shoes and laces. 

School for Basketball Officials 

The Seventeenth Annual School for Basketball Offi- 
cials was held at the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on 
August 8-9, 1965. Basketball Clinic Director Qiarlie 
Vettiner directed the school. 

The services of the area representatives who at- 
tended the school will be available to Association 
member schools throughout the basketball season. The 



men will conduct additional clinics for officials, 
coaches, and players; and will assist beginning offi- 
cials in registration. 

K.H.S.A.A. area representatives who attended the 
school were: Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont; E. B. May, 
Jr., Prestonsburg; Roy Winchester, Bethlehem; Goebel 
Ritter, Whitesburg; Ernie Chattin, Ashland; Claude 
Ricketts, Valley Station; Jack Wise, Georgetown; Rex 
Alexander, Murray; Howard Gardner, Elizabethtown; 
Bob Miller, Fort Thomas; Harry Stephenson, Lexing- 
ton; Bob Foster, Science Hill; Charlie Irwin, Hopkins- 
ville; Turner Elrod, Bowling Green; BiU Nau, Bar- 
bourville; Roy Settle, Owensboro. 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at Kenlake Hotel, Kentucky 
Lake State Park, on Saturday morning, July 31, 1965. 
The meeting was called to order by retiring President 
Oran C. Teater at 9:30, with Board members Morton 
Combs, Don Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, Sherman Gish, 
Preston Holland, Don R. Rawlings, and Foster J. 
Sanders; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. The invocation 
was given by Preston Holland. 

President Teater stated that he appreciated the 
honor which members of the Board had conferred on 
him in naming him Board president for the 1964-65 
school year, and that he also appreciated all of the 
cooperation which he had received during the year 
from members of the Board. The Commissioner, the 
Assistant Commissioner, and members of the Board all 
expressed their sentiments concerning the leadership 
which had been given the K.H.S.A.A. by Mr. Teater 
during the year just ended. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Morton Combs, 
that the reading of the minutes of the April 9th meet- 
ing be waived, since the members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

President Teater stated that the next order of 
business was the election of the president and vice- 
president of the Board of Control. Don R. Rawlings 
moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, that Foster J. 
Sanders and Preston Holland be elected president and 
vice-president of the Board of Control respectively by 
acclamation. The motion was carried, with Mr. Sanders 
and Mr. Holland not voting. Mr. Sanders accepted the 
Board presidency for 1965-66 with appropriate remarks. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board on 
the receipts and disbursements during the year 1964-65. 
Copies of the audit, recently prepared by Johnson and 
Lusk of LouisvUle, Certified Public Accountants, had 
been mailed to the members of the Board. Ralph C. 
Dorsey moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that the 
financial report of the Commissioner be accepted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented rules and regulations 
governing meets and tournaments, which had been pre- 
pared by him and the Assistant Commissioner. Sports 
involved were Track (boys and girls), Baseball, Cross 
Country, Golt (boys and girls). Swimming (boys and 
girls). Tennis (boys and girls). Wrestling, Rifle, and 
Football. There was a lengthy discussion of the regula- 
tions, with certain changes and additions being made. 
The Commissioner recommended that the regulations 
as amended be adopted, along with the present regu- 
lations governing basketball tournaments of the Associ- 
ation. Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Preston 
Holland, that the recommendations of the Commissioner 
concerning the adoption of tournament and meet regu- 
lations be accepted and adopted. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



Page Three 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Governing Cross Country Meets 

(Adopt'ed by the Board of Control) 

Regional Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the meets shall be deter- 
mined by the Commissioner with the approval of the 
Board of Control. All meets will be held on or as near 
the dates indicated on the activities calendar as local 
conditions permit. 

II. Assignment of Schools to Regions 

The state shall be divided into regions by the 
Commissioner who will assign the schools to the 
regional sites. 

III. Regional Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each region. It is the duty of tlie manager to notify 
the regional schools of the time and place of the meet, 
to supply them with entry blanks, to invite their parti- 
cipation, and to make all arrangements for the meet. 

IV. Contestants 

A school may enter five, six or seven boys as a 
team. 

V. Substitutes 

Any contestant whose name is on the entry blank 
may be substituted for the original entry prior to the 
time of the event. 

VI. Length of Course 

The course will be approximately two miles in 
length. 

VII. Champion 

The team score shall be determined by totaling 
the places of the first five finishing contestants on 
each team. 

VIII. Trophies and Awards 

Trophies will be awarded the teams finishing first 
and second. The first five individuals to finish will 
receive awards. 

IX. State Qualifying 

Representation at the state meet shaU be deter- 
mined by the number of teams competing in each 
region. Also qualifying will be the first five individuals 
not on quahfying teams. 

X. State Information and Entry Blanks 

The coaches shall secure entry blanks from the 
regional manager before leaving the site of the meet. 
State Regulations 

I. Date and Site 

The date and site of the meet shall be determined 
by the Commissioner with the approval of the Board 
of Control. 

II. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for the 
state meet. 

III. Contestants 

Eligible to enter are individuals and teams of five, 
six or seven runners, who qualified in a regional 
meet. 

IV. Substitutes 

Any contestant whose name is on the state entry 
blank may be a member of the team. A contestant 
who qualifies as an individual may not have a substi- 
tute. 

V. Length of Course 

The course will be approximately two miles in 
length. 

VI. Expense Allowance 

The individual winner and members of the cham- 
pionship team in the regional meet will receive ex- 
pense allowances. The coach will also receive an ex- 
pense allowaince. 



VII. Trophies and Awards 

Trophies will be awarded the teams finishing first 
and second. The first fifteen individuals to finish will 
receive awards. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Governing the State Wrestling Tournament 
(Adopted by the Board of Control) 

I. Date and Site 

The date and site of the tournament shall be 
determined by the Commissioner with the approval of 
the Board of Control. 

II. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for the 
tournament. 

III. Contestants 

A school may enter a team composed of one con- 
testant in each weight class. 

IV. Pairings 

The manager will make the pairings by seeding 
and/or drawing. 

V. Weight Classification 

Competition shall be divided into weight classes as 
follows: 95, 103, 112, 120, 127, 133, 138, 145, 154, 165, 180, 
Heavyweight. 
Vi. Rules 

The Interscholastic Wrestling Rules as given in the 
"Official CoLIegiate-Scholastic Wrestling Guide" will be 
used. 
VII. Expense Allowance 

Each team and its coach will receive an expense 
aUowaace. 
VIM. Trophies and Awards 

Trophies will be given to the winning team and to 
the runner-up. Awards will be given to the outstanding 
wresUer and for first, second, and third places in each 
weight classification. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Governing Swimming Meets (Boys & Girls) 

(Adopted by the Board of Control) 

State Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the meets shall be deter- 
mined by the Commissioner with the approval of the 
Board of Control. 

II. Assignment of Schools to Classes 

The schools that have swinmiing teams shall be 
assigned to Class AAA or Class AA on the basis of 
enrollment in Grades 10-12. 

III. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each meet. It is the duty of the manager to notify all 
schools of the time and place of the meet, to supply 
them with entry blanks, to invite their participation, 
and to make all the arrangements for the meet. 

IV. Contestants 

A school may enter four contestants in each event 
except the relays. A school may enter only one relay 
team. A contestant may enter three events, no more 
than two of which may be individual events. 

V. Substitutes 

Any contestant whose name is on the eligibility list 
may be substituted on the team prior to the meet. 

VI. Pairings 

The manager will arrange the contestants into 
heats for the prehminaries. 

VII. Events 

All meets will have the following events: 200 Yard 

Medley Relay, 200 Yard Freestyle, 50 Yard Freestyle, 

200 Yard Individual Medley, Fancy Diving, 100 Yard 

Butterfly, 100 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard Backstroke, 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



The Flying Dutchman 

Down Hodgenville way people will tell you that one 
of the greatest sportsmen to "come down the pike" in 
this century is the Dutchman's long-time friend, Irby 
Hummer. This chap is a promoter of every wholesome 
sport in the book. When Irby was coaching he was 
one of the best; when he was officiating he had few 
peers, and on the golf course Irby will shoot birds and 
eagles with the best of them. This chap is a legend 
in his own time with a homespun humor reminding 
one of the immortal Will Rogers. 

Whenever Irby makes up his mind to go into ac- 
tion, he acts now. It might be winter but "Promoter" 
Hummer is thinking way ahead to summer. The snow 
was more than a foot deep outside the Dutchman's 
office when a long distance call came in from Irby a 
couple of years ago. Said Irby, "Dutchman, I've found 
some ground down here; come on down and help me 
plan a golf course. We haven't any money but let's get 
something going anyway. While you're down here we'll 

fatten you up on fried chicken" That's my boy, 

Irby Hummer! 

Because of the good Irby Hummer has done for 
youngsters, always striving to improve athletics and 
sports facilities for them, and because he ranks with 
such outstanding Kentuckians as Herb Ockerman of 
Florence and Mosco Blackburn of Hazard, Irby Hum- 
mer becomes the third Kentuckian to qualify during 
the past fifteen years for the plaque proclaiming him 
one of "Nature's Noblemen." Herb was first, Mosco 
was second and now it's Irby cariying off the third 
honor. Attention, Howard Gardner down in Elizabeth- 
town! How about arranging a public occasion when 
the Dutchman can personally be on hand to present 
the "Nature's Nobleman" award to his old buddy? 

Here's a story with a moral! Fifteen years ago a 
lean, eager kid started to caddy at a golf course, learn- 
ed to love the game, worked to get his first set of 
clubs, and started to Louisville's St. Xavier to get his 
high school education. He captained his high school 
team and went on to Bellarmine College to captain the 
golf team there. In 1961 the lad won the Junior Falls 
Cities Championship. He won the Kentucky Intercollegi- 
ate Championship in 1962-63-64. 

In describing the young lad's early habits his Dad 
said that he might not have been too careful where 
he dropped 'his clothes or how hard he scrubbed be- 
hind his ears, but he was always so very meticulous 
about caring for his golf clubs. The boy took care of 
hife athletic equipment .... That made an impression 
when he appMed for a top golf professional job this 
spring. 

While being interviewed, his quiet, friendly perso- 
nality worked in his favor but what really "wrapped 
up the Pro's job" for him was ihis reputation for self- 
control and the fine personal example he sets for kids. 
Let your young athletes read this story of a young 
man who knew where he wanted to go and then lived 
the kind of life which laid the road wide open for him 
.... Then let them drop by the brand new Bobby 
Nichols GoU Course in beautiful Waverly Park in Jef- 
ferson County to meet David Baron, the youthful goU 
pro, an exponent of clean sports who got the job 
because he prepared himself and was ready when 
opportunity knocked. 

At the School for Basketball Officials which the 
K. H. S. A. A. sponsors in Lexington each August 
there were a lot of golfers by their own admission. 
Next year the fellows plan a tournament between Rex 
Alexander, Roy Settle, Turner Elrod, Jack Wise, Harry 
Stephenson, BUI Nau and Goebel Ritter to decide a 




la»^ 



Irby Hummer 



David Baron 



School Champion. Here's a tip to these duffers and 

other goiters If your golfing score is over 100. 

worry about your golf; if it's under 70, worry about 
your job. 

Here are some short news items! Send Oakley 
Brown a get-well card addressed Yosemite, Kentucky. 
The former Hopkinsville, E'town and St. Xavier coach 
is on an indefinite sick leave. Charlie Irwin, Jerry Kim- 
mel and Bob Foster will officiate basketball in college 
conferences this season, and Harry Stephenson will 
work pro football games this fall. Harold Craig is 
Valley's new backfield coach assisting Coach Dallas 
Arnold, and Ernie Chattin is about to become a grand- 
father again. 

If you are in Indianapolis on September 25, drop 
in on the Dutchman's basketball clinic he is conducting 
at the Sheraton-Lincoln Hotel for Colonel Phil Eskew 
and Colonel Herman Keller, Commissioner and Assis- 
tant Commissioner of the Indiana High School Athletic 
Association. The Kentucky clinics begin the following 
day at Lexington in the Phoenix Hotel. A telephone 
caU just came in from Colonel Paul Landis and Colonel 
Harold Meyer who occupy the same positions in Ohio 
as Phil and Herman in Indiana. Paul and Harold want 
the Dutchman to conduct the Ohio Clinic at Green 
Meadows Inn outside Columbus on November 14 for the 
third consecutive year. Football is just getting a good 
start but already basketball is peeping around the 
corner. 

Edgar McNabb has earned an enviable reputation 
in the field of football rules interpretation. If tall, 
easy-going and likeable "Mac" could hear all of the 
compliments which have come to this columnist re- 
garding his football clinic work, he would realize just 
how great h i s contribution is to Kentucky's young 
athletes, coaches and officials. When you put fellows 
like Edgar McNabb, Bob Miller and Stan Arnzen on a 
job, they get it done. These are three of the reasons 
why things are never dull in northern Kentucky. 

Elroy Cartwright of Shively gets the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor for the month of September. Elroy, who 
formerly coached in Ohio County, is now at Butler 
High School. It was due to Elroy Cartwright's devotion 
to unselfish service to young and old alike which 
caused a model 50 acre park to be developed on River 
Road in Jefferson County. Elroy developed a lawn 
bowling rink here which will be opened next summer. 
In these parts Elroy is known as the "'Lovable Red- 
head." 

Drop around Carrie Gaulbert Cox Park sometime 
and offer to help the "carrot topped Park Expert," 
and you'll hear him say, "I can get this job done 
today but if you insist on helping me it's gonna take a 
week." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



Page Five 



Registered Football Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A. - 1965 

If the telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Adams, Calvin K., 5891-B Adams, Fort Knox, 4-8287, 4-5314 
Adams, Charles David, 5702 Indian Eock Road, Louisville, 

964-5419 
Adkins, James A., Jr., Co. B, 3rd Bn., Sch. Bde.„ Fort Knox, 

4-7246, 4-4241 
Albright, James R., Route No. 3, Shelbyville, 633-4614, CA 

7-9661 ext. 295 
Allen, Clyde E., Jr., 5215 Coolbrook Rd., Fern Creek,, 239-0190 
Alston, Rev. E. Deedom. 1016 South 43rd St. Louisville, 

772-1092, 589-6429 
Anders, Raleigh A., Route No. 5, Box 73A, London, 864-2552, 

864-5103 
Anderson, E. W., Jr., 504 Highland, Mayfield, 247-1794, 247- 

1637 
Asbui-y. Frank, 619 North Second, Richmond, 623-6797 
Ayers, Edward L., 625 Laramie, Lexington, 277-2333, 277- 

1161 
Ballaban. Thomas, 1103 Archland Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 622- 

3024, 761-7600 
Barbour. Morris, 440 Wilberforce, Louisville, 683-9079 
Barlow, Bill B., Box 214, Millersburg, 484-2063, 299-1221 

ext. 6220 
Barnett, Willis, 2208 West Chestnut, Louisville, 778-7628 
Bates, Bob, 2732 Sunrise, Portsmouht, Ohio, EL 4-2168 
Battisti, Edward A.. Route No. 1, Box 154-A, Radcliff, 351- 

3543, 4-3354 
Beach. Harold, 3007 4th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Beck, C. Norman, 2588 Filson Ave., Louisville, ME 4-1737, JU 

2-3511 ext. 352 
Beheler, Donald Stuart, 311 Springhill Dr., Paris, 987-1728, 

252-2250 ext 2698 
Bell, Clarence T.. 1228 South 41st St., Louisville, 778-7792, 

582-5569 
Bennett, Howard, Route No. 6, Mayfield, 247-3309, 247-3610 
Benton, James L., 625 Jimwood Drive, Vine Grove, 877-5407, 

Ft. Knox 4-7057 
Benzinger, Joseph Jr., 3502 Behymer Rd., Cincinnati 45, 

Ohio, 752-3932, 752-0555 
Hero, James J., Box 968, Williamson, W. Va. 
Bivins, George W., 3105 Talisman Rd., Louisville, 459-6111, 

895-0521 
Blackburn, Adrian, 407 Scott Court, Prestonsburg, 886-2401, 

886-3080 
Blackburn, Tennyson R., Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blackburn, Viley O., 210 College, Somerset, 678-8986, 678-8171 
Blanton, Homer. 138 New Hampshire Drive, Ashland, 324-1730, 

324-4646 
Blosser, Kermit A., 80 Maplewood Dr., Athens, Ohio, LY 2- 

2792, 594-6435 
Bocook, Earl. 1102 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Boeh, Bill, 3804 Mac Nicholas, Deer Park, Ohio. 791-8880, 761- 

1876 
Boemker, Bob, 69 Thompson, South Fort Mitchell, 331-1708, 

721-2700 ext. 360 
Bond, Jack C, 776 Cindy Blair Way, Lexington, 277-2351, 

252-2250 ext. 3215 
Bordy, Phil, 3308 Stratford, Louisville, 458-7005, 682-3994 
Bowles, Charles Haniel. 1647 Alexandria Drive, Lexington, 

277-3198, 262-8068 
Bowman, E. G., 689 Mt. Vernon Drive, Lexington, 255-6666. 

278-1101 
Boyles, Jerry F., 2700 Algonquin Ave.,, Ashland, 324-6995, 

324-1111 
r, Robert A., 282 Longview Drive, Bowling Green, 843- 



Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louisville, 454-6843, 

689-9111 
Brock, John H., 611 Virginia Ave., Pineville, 337-2453 
Brown, Bill, 2653 Dell Rio, Louisville, 468-4857. 583-0681 
Brown, Herman G., Route No. 2. Shelbyville, 633-2616, Lou- 
isville 589-9177 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 252-0954, 

262-3212 
Browning, Haburn R., 1921 Oxford Circle. Lexington 
Bunn, Gary L.. 2718 First Ave., Huntington, Va., 526-6547, 

526-0391 
Burke, Daniel F., 1116 Maureen Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471- 

9631. 821-7411 
Burke, David Dean, 517 Tenth, Catlettsburg, 739-4283, 324-6161 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, 

TU 6-2385 
Burkhart, James G.. Loyall 573-1437 

Burton, E. James. 401 Barbour, Providence, 667-2296, 667-5360 
Byars, Michael Kirk, 2209 Coburn Blvd., Lexington, 266-3347, 

264-9895 
Cain, Paul D., 3196 Lookout Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, 281- 

9740, 321-7246 
Caiman, E. C. Jr., 1124 Washington, Sturgis. 335-6546 (Bus.) 
Canaday, Jacy Glenn, Ekron, 828-3898, 877-6537 



Canady, Ray Blair, Court Square, Barbourville, 546-4765, 546- 

3801 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, 451-8218, 587-8862 
Carlberg, John H., 227 Main, Muldraugh, 942-2723 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington St., Paducah, 444-7943, 

444-6311 ext. 401 
Carr, Virgil Lee, 2924 Fitzwater Dr., South Charleston, W. 

Va. 



Carroll, James L., Lincoln Ave., Paintsville, 789-3601, 789- 

4066 
Cassell, David F., 7413 Lorenzo Lane, Louisville, 239-9165 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Fort Thomas, 441-8427, 381- 

1480 
Chattin, Ernie, 616— 17th St., Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 
Chinn, Mike, Rockport, Indiana, MI 9-2861, 684-8811 
Chinn, Ralph, 3206 Hampton St., Ashland, 324-0683 
Cisco, Robert N., 4016 Vine Grove Rd., Ft. Knox, 4-4273, 4- 

Clark, Maxie B., 165 Avon Ave., Lexington, 254-9301, 252-6494 
Clark, Owen, 106 Kentucky Ave., Georgetown, 2047, Lexington, 

252-8717 
Clemmons, Sam, 635 Central Ave., Lexington ,265-3562, 252- 

6818 
Clouse, Veryl R., Route No. 2, Pedro. Ohio, 632-5787 (Bus.) 
Clusky, Joe, Box 296, Red Jacket. W. Va. 

Cochran. Roy H., Jr., 713 Caldwell, Corbin, 528-6373, 864-4340 
Cole, Harold, 1425 Wurts Ave., Ashland, 234-6672, 325-4706 
Collins, Jack, 6 Gino Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-0154, Ft. 

Campbell 4404 
Cook, Richard N., 931 Maple Ave., Dayton, 291-6880, 243-2279 
Copley, Sidney M., Box 362, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Corea. Frank, Box 452, Williamson. W. Va. 
Cox, Jerry H., Route No. 2. Rineyville, 765-7674 
Grace, James B., 892 Orchard Park Dr., Hurricane. W. Va. 
Craft, Albert B., 345 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 254-5366, 264- 

0764 
Craft, Bill N.. Jr., 140 Vanderbilt Drive, Lexington, 277-4843, 

277-3737 
Crager, Bobby F., South Lake Drive, Prestonsburg, 886- 

2252 (Bus.) 
Crain, Donald J., Route No. 2, Warsaw, Ohio, 327-2364, 327- 

2361 
Criniti, Frank, 848 Chappell Rd., Charleston, W. Va. 
Crosthwaite, John S.. Jr.. 8139 Elbow Lane. North St. 

Petersburg, Fla., 344-7661, 898-2141 
Cullen, Charles E.. 3010 Don Dee Drive, Louisville, 461- 

3322, 895-0626 
Gulp, Willard E., 318 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7967, 439-6032 
Curnutte, James R., 201 East Eighth Ave., Hunntington, W. 

Va. 
Current, Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte, Lexingtno, 277-1049, 

265-4660 
Dallman, James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

283-7265 
Daniel, Ernest H., 2317 Bath Ave., Ashland, 324-2785, 324- 

1156 ext. 252 
Dann, Nick, Morehead, 784-5646, 784-4163 
Davis, Clyde E., 2531 East Euclid Ave., Ashland, 324-7804, 

325-1751 
Davis, Curt, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, 634-4959, JU 2-3511 
Davis, Ralph C, 1326 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-8606, 

532-8143 
Deaton, Dan, Matewan, W. Va. 
DeMont, Cant. Robert W., 5606-A Gilkey, Ft. Knox, 4-1071, 

4-5959 
DeMuth, Pa ul E., 7510 Westdale Road, Louisville, 425-2465, 

WH 5-6237 
Dennedy. Robert 6083 Orangelawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

921-3906, 662-2200 
Dent, Donald L., 13327 Forge Circle, Valley Station, 937-5770, 

636-4551 
Denton, Charles, 127 South Hubbard Lane, Henderson, VA 6- 

4020 
Denton, William J., 3524 Manslick Road • — 19A, Louisville, 

366-5970, 458-9171 
Deutsch, T. C Jr.. 1019 Lenox Place, Cincinnati, Ohio, 961- 

4366, 751-8440 
Dial, Charles R.. 3300 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dial, Jack W.. 3179 Sumner Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf, Lt. Col. William H.. Jr.. Dir. of Services, Bldg. 

T 742, Ft. Belvoir, Va., 2-3269 3-0145 
Dixie, Cornelius, 608 South Clay, Louisville, 587-7680, 366- 

9561 ext. 504 
Dizney. Alan. 206 Fourth. Corbin, 628-3313, 528-4606 
Doll, Lou's E.. 12162 Chesterdale Rd., Cincninati, Ohio, 771- 

3412, 761-4210 
Dorsey. James. 1110 Gilsey Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8050 
Downey Robert F.. 327 — 26th St. Dunbar, W. Va. 
D"ff. Earl. 218 Lyttle Blvd.. Hazard 436-2725 436-3136 
D'Tkin Jack. 291 Burke Rd.. Lexington 264-0146, 254-1714 
Edwards. David H., 1513 Powell Court. Huntington, W. Va. 
Elliott, Carroll L. 307 College St., Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Ellis, Johnny, Box 331, Prestonsburg, 6-2761, 6-3080 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



Elovitz. Carl, 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 277-3994. 

873-4901 
Engle, Orville. 128 Oak St., Pineville, 337-2916 
Ernst, Edward R.. Bo.x 244, Erlanger, 689-7181 
Fallon, Robert J., 142 Pear, Hazard. 436-4528, 436-2151 
Fandrich, William W., Murray, 753-3193 
Faust, Jack, 2427 Concord Drive. Louisville, 634-4204, S84- 

6236 
Fenimore, Clarke E., 3943 Kennison Ave., Louisville, 896- 
Fenton, Don J.. 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 271- 

3792, 751-4344 
Ferguson. Jesse S.. 1719 Model Road, Louisville, 774-2831, 

778-2731 e-xt. 324 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 922 Lee St., Barboursville, W. Va. 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas., 441-6288, 562-6461 
Fields Ronald M., 1039 Madison, Henderson, 826-9859, 826-8381 
Fish, Leland G.. 826 Oak Hill, Lexington, 255-7156, 254-7077 
Fletcher. John L.. 5723-B Brown, Ft. Knox. 4-2079, 4-2062 
Foster, Berryman E.. 927 Waverly Drive. Lexington. 255-7783 
Florence. Robert H.. 308 North 36th St.. Paducah, 444-7489, 

444- )691 
Fortney. Robert Lee, 2817 Breck Lane, Louisville, 458-1079, 

JU 2-3511 ext. 472 
Foster, Joseph W.. 176 Market St.. Apt. 13, Lexington, 254- 

3670, 255-6666 
Fraley. Bill. 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, VA 7-3232 
Frankel. Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, 464-6519, 

464-6519 
Franklin, James A., 2913 Hackworth St., Ashland. 325-3934, 

324-1111 ext. 5534 
Frazer, Tom Roe, 1002 Main. Sturgis. 333-4412, 333-4672 
Frederick. Jimmie L., 208 West Main, Providence, MO 2596 
Freese, Oliver T.. 5518 Mapleridge. Cincinnati. Ohio, 561-5398, 

351-7010 
Fruit, William E., Route No. 1, Box 504, Henderson, VA 7- 

3540 
Fm-ear, Bill P., 1564 Baldwin, Bowling Green, VI 2-0088, 

VI 2-2411 
Fuccx, Dom, 752 Wellington Way, Lexington, 277-6327, 254- 

8030 
Pugate, E. Hugh, 329 Mockingbird Drive, Frankfort, 223- 

1340, 227-9661 ext. 335 
Fuller, Wilton H., 533 Hill-n-Dale, Lexington, 277-6664 
Funkhouser, Roy A. 209 East 17th St., Hopkinsvlile, 886-1923, 

798-2422 
Galuk. Walter M.. 1405 Montgomery Ave., Ashland, 325-3305. 

325-1751 
Garrett, Richard A.. Lexington Theological Seminary, Lex- 
ington, 255-4765 
Gentry, Dale, J., 4946 Determine Lane, Louisville, 447-5981, 

685-5814 
Gettler, John P., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 266-4801, 

262-6494 
Gilligan, Jack. 1146 Tassie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522-2042, 

522-2042 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 East Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Gorham, Harry C, 117 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 255-4257, 

299-5214 
Gour. Bob, 218 S. Lee St.. Bowling Green, 843-9582 
Grace, Charles K.. Cypress St., Pineville. 337-3331. 337-2348 
Grady. Clarence O.. 420 North Main. Marion, 965-3131 
Graham, Jim. 4505 Blackburn Ave., Ashland. 324-8169. 324- 

5199 ext. 376 
Greene, Paul Dutch, 2626 Adams Ave.. Ashland, 324-9216, 

324-5161 
Greenoe, Richard H., 14 Clore Court. Henderson, 826-9743, 

827-3667 
Grieco, Joe, 2703 Shaffer, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Griffith, Lauren, 7408 Cross Creek Blvd., Louisville, 239-9707, 

451-7766 
Griggs. John M.. 3045 Dartmouth Drive. Lexington. 278-2422 
Gruneisen, Sam, 815 McKinley Ave., Louisville, Ky., 634- 

9964. 634-9401 
Hadden, Newell P.. Jr.. 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington, 255- 

5332. 252-7866 
Hagan, Joe, 3000 Sherbrooke Rd.. Louisville, 458-1325 
Hagerman, Bart, 1912 Ashland Ave., Ashland, 325-4227, 324- 

1111 ext. 5462 
Hagy, Harold J., 715 Grant St.. Charleston, W. Va. 
Hall, Dale. 302 2nd Ave., Chesapeake, Ohio. 867-3370, Hunt- 
ington, W. Va., 522-1912 
Hall, Kenneth, P. O. Box 445, Muldraugh, Ft. Knox 4-2623 

(Bus.) 
Hammock. Don L.. 1512 Audubon Parkway. Louisville. 636- 

7111. 585-4149 
Hall. Henry N.. 106 Loch Lomond. Lexington, 277-4986, 254- 

7312 
Hall, John R., 2610 Central Parkway, Ashland, 325-7306, 324- 

1111 
Hall, Richard T., 2926 Rio Rita, Louisville, GL 8-6611, 367- 

6131 
Hanes, Edward C. 1508 Ridgecrest. Bowling Green, 843- 

3432. 842-0031 
Harris, David L.. 505 North 4th. Bardstown, 348-5733, 348-5733 
Harris, Gene 201 Riverside Drive, Russell, 836-8803 
Harris Jerry. Route No. 1. Cedar H'll. Tennessee 696-2211 
Harris. Russell. 368 Boiling Spring. Lexington, 254-6525 
Hatfield, Gene E, 103 Henderson Drive South, Fulton, 472- 

2825, 443-4500 



Hawkins. Will A., Box 10 3, Cedar Hill, Tenn., 696-2390, 

Springfield, Tenn., 384-5583 
Hedge, David W., 321 Mockingbird Drive, Jeffersonville, In- 
diana, BU 2- 2242 
Heinichen. Carl, 1941 Schollenberger Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 

4716, 451-2430 
Heinold, F. Thomas. 6702 Plantation, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522- 

7834, 631-5750 
Heinze. Frank, 204 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg. 886-2436 
Heinze, John G., 39 Highland Ave.. Prestonsburg, 886-2195, 

874-2110 
Hendon. L. J., 228 South 15th St., Murray. 753-3658, 763-2825 
Hertzberger, Robert H., 1310 Terrace, Evansville Indiana, 

HA 4-1681. HA 5-6211 ext. 214 
Hicks. Lloyd, 6253 Spring Meyer Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

662-5103, 961-7820 ext. 216 
Hellard, Geoi-ge D., Jr., 572 Longview Drive, Lexington, 277- 

2643, 254-0784 
Helvey, O. J. 515 Elm St., Williamsburg, 6932, 6660 
Hill, Earl F., London. 864-2521, 864-2128 
Hofstetter. Joe. Box 2173. Williamson. W .Va. 
Holbrook. William M., 2421 Forest Ave.. Ashland. 324-5850, 

324-2144 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Popplar St.. Dawson Springs, 797- 

4241 
Holland, David W., Box 43. Water Valley, 355-2640, 77 
Hollingsworth. Ralph D.. 804 South Main, Springfield, Tenn., 

384-5467, 384-5283 
Holman, S. T.. 207 2nd St., Corbin. 528-5197, 528-1332 
Holton, Glenn, 621 McClung Ave.. Barboursville. W. Va. 
Huber. Jerry. 404 Scott. Covington, 681-0897. 431-5723 
Huber, Carl W., 125 North 37th St., Louisville, 774-3387 
Hughes. Paul P., 520 Riverside Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-6771, 

886-2170 
Huiet, Fred, 7241 Longfield, Madeira, Ohio, 561-9239, 661-9903 
Hurlev, Robert, Box 244, Williamson, W. Va. 
Huston. Roderick J., 4930. Apt. D, Rose Terrace, Ft. Knox, 

942-2460, 4-2942 
Hynson, Fred R.. 2056 St. Christopher, Lexington, 266-4285, 

254-9895 
Idol. Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Rd., Middlesboro. 248-2837 
Idol. Lloyd. Jr.. 116 Leaf Wood. Middlesboro. 248-5761 
Ishmael. Stephen A.. 2003 South 2nd St. Louisville. ME 7-3822 
Jacoby. Ben W.. 127 Showalter Dr.. Georgetown. 2342 
Jahnigen. Robert E.. 6675 Plantation. Cincinnati, Ohio, 521- 

2424 
James, Gene. 1507 South 3rd St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6976, 

JE 2-6224 
Jarrell. Frank W.. Box 46. Ceredo. W. Va. 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside Drive, Elizabethtown, 765- 

4887, 765-4606 
Jennings, Michael, 7341/. Winchester Ave., Ashland, 325-7535, 

324-2111 
Johnson. Gordon M.. Second St.. Meeks Apt. No. 1. Paintsville, 

789-3722 (Bus.) 
Johnson, Harry A.. Jr., 348 Friendman Ave.. Paducah. 443- 

1767. 444-6311 ext. 206 
Johnson. Stan W.. 2115 Ottawa Drive. Owensboro. 684-2157 
Jones. J. Carl. 1904 Goodwin, Corbin. 528-2349. 258-2450 
Jones. Jack W., 3906 Washington St.. S. W.. South Charies- 

ton. W. Va. 
Jones. John H.. Route No. 5, Scottsville. 237-3959 
Jones, Paul, 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown, 765-4502, Ft. 

Knox 4-7019 
Jones, William A., Jr.. 252 North 38th St., Paducah, 443-7464, 

444-9691 
Julian. James R., 119 Catherine Drive, Hurricane, W. Va. 
Junker. Edwin. G.. 1045 W. Seymour. Cincinnati, Ohio, 821-4117 
Karr. Don. 1906 Early St., Corbin. 528-6466 
Kimble. Frank. Box 2173. Williamson, W. Va. 
King. Allen, 216 North Main, Henderson. 826-9647. 826-3321 
Kraft. H. Nellis. 668-South 40th St., Louisville, 772-9636. 

583-2701 ext. 45 
Kallaher. James E., 2016 Appleton Lane, Louisville, 367-8506. 

367-8506 
Kathman, Bernie. 3060 Elmwood Drive, South Ft. Mitchell, 

341-7369, 621-7541 
Kauffman. Victor C, 3635 West 8th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

921-9230, 661-8800 
Keller. Terry Joe. 209 Oak St.. Ludlow. 581-8777 
Kemper. Russ, 5732 Lauderdale. Cincinnati. Ohio. 931-6222, 

621-4380 
Kerr. Kenneth. 10806 Grafton Hall, Valley Station, 937-3008, 

58.5-2701 ext. 45 
Kraesig, Charles F., Route No. 1, Marengo. Ind.. ME 5-4842, 

Louisville EM 6-0326 
Kratzenberg. Ralph. 2412 South 10th St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 

2-5741, JE 2-5741 
Lambert, Ii-vin G., 5100 Rural Way, Louisville, 969-4718 
Lancaster, Morris. B.. 204 Barberry Lane, Lexington. 278- 

3022. Richmond 623-3151 
Landers. John F.. 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville. Tenn.. 647- 

2656. 3313-2718 
Lange. William E. Jr.. 323 Cecil, Louisville, 774-2974. 368-2581 
Lawaon. Leland, 949 DePorres, Lexington. 254-1009. 252-3044 
Leahy, Pat. 1819 Ratcliffe, Louisville, 776-6368, JU 7-1121 

ext. 472 
Ledbetter, Paul M., 5760-A. Allison, Ft. Knox, 4-8440, 4-6766 
Lehman, Donald A., o414-E.Caffee, Ft. Knox, 4-2904, 4-8118 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



Page Sexen 



Retreat Ed., Louisville, 964-4636, 

Liber, James, 7826 Pine Meadow, Cincinnati, Ohio, 931-9577, 

721-6617 
Linden, Bob, 2208 Jasmine, Lexington, 278-2439, 278-2439 
Lingo, Heni-y E., 504 Cedar Crest Dr., Vine Grove, 877-2346, 

877-5537 
Lloyd, Birt Leonard. 3610 Rear Brandon, Huntington, W. Va. 
Locke, William F., 172 Parkhurst Drive, Bowling Green, 842- 

0665, 842-1674 
Logan, Eli. 421 Popular, Hazard, 436-2610, 436-2151 
Lopp, Wilbur Howard, 1906 Hoke Rd.. Louisville, AN 7-5010. 

451-9800 
Lotz. Robert W., 106 Buttercup Rd., Louisville, CE 9-3976, 

ME 4-9491 
lK)we, Gene T., Route No. 6, Box 28, London, 864-5724, 864- 

2207 
Lowe, Stan, Box 337. Russellville, PA 6-6647, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, CY 7-6521 
Lusby, George, 615 Pueblo Trail, Georgetown, 2312. 70 
Lutz. Charles J.. 2705 South 6th St.. Ironton, Ohio, 532-5237. 
McConachie, Bud, 5608 Halstead Ave., Louisville, 969-9676 
McCarter. Sgt. Bobby, Co.. D., L. R. P.. 17th Inf., A P O 

09079, New York City, N. Y. 
McDougal, Alf, 705 Copple St., Russellville. 726-7502, JU 6- 

4451 
MeFadden. Jimmie, 649 Northside Drive, Lexington, 299-1635, 

299-1635 
McGehee, Gordon. 733 Forest Lane, Covington, 261-6880 
McGlasson, Gene. 1800 Brentmoor Lane, Anchorage. 425-4654 
McGuire. Jack. 6421 Six Mile Lane, Louisville. 459-4031 
McKenzie. Robert L.. 1809 Chestnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
McKinney. Adelle F, 5421-C Mulvaney. Ft. Knox, 4-5860, 4- 

4558 
McLemore, Jack T., 217 Merriman Rd., Louisville, 893-5232. 

584-1211 
McMillan. James N., Y. M. C. A.. Ashland, 836-8054. 324-6191 
McNamee, Jack. 3616 Muddycreek, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-5207 
McPeek. Talmadge, 4716 Boyd, Ashland, 324-9775, 324-1191 

ext. 55 
McSheffrey, Sgt. James E., 4865-A Rose Terrace, Ft. Knox, 

942-2226, 942-6932 
Magruder, Earl L.. 4100 Pixley Way, Louisville. 969-7045 
Madon, Robert Lee. 215 Tennessee Ave., Pineville, 7-2135, 

7-3043 
Marsili, Lee A.. Lynch. 848-5673 
Matarazzo S. M.. 320 North Mulberry. Elizabethtown, 765- 

5689, 4-4748 
Matthews, Billy D., 506 Boren, Sppringfield. Tenn.. 384-5550. 

384-3561 
Mattingly, Charles. 3813 Poplar Level Rd., Louisville. 459-5793 
May, Charles E.. P. O. Box 185, Prestonsburg. 886-3414, 886- 

8661 
May, E. B., Jr.. Box 185, Prestonsburg, 886-3414. 886-8661 
Mayhew, William M.. Pawnee Drive. Route No. 3. Elizabeth- 
town, 765-2706, Ft. Knoxx 4-7247 
Maynard. Andrew, J., Box 123. Matewan, W. Va. 
Maynard. Dr. Joe E., 809 Nesbitt Drive. Madison. Tenn. 
Mayo, Henry L., 581 College St., Paintsville. 789-3871, 789-4001 
Mays, Raymond K.. 104 Samuels Ave.. Barboursville, W. Va. 
Melmige. James, Jr.. Box 2117. Williamson. W. Va. 
Mercke, Frank R., 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, 896-8460, 634- 

9491 
Mercker, George E., 803 Republic Bldg., Louisville, 451-8399, 

582-1645 
Messerian. Nishan. 175 East 3rd Ave.. Williamson. W. Va. 
Metzger, Don, 9312 Cloverwood Ln., Fern Creek. 454-7511 ext. 

4624 
Meyer, Bud. 5319 Lilibet Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-3459. 

421-3010 
M'Vkev. Elbevt W., Box 2471. Williamson. W. Va. 
Millerhaus. W. J., 818 Elberon, Cincinnati, Ohio, 741-8467, 

921-9722 
Minta, John H.. 326 W. Carter. Clarksville, Indiana, BU 3-8553, 

JU 2-3571 
Mitchell, Vyron W.. 901 Walnut. Fulton, 472-1493. 472-1121 
Moellerine. Loiiis H.. 6287 Lilbur Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

231-6693, 681-3510 
Moody. William R.. 2032 Oleander Drive, Lexington, 277- 

9622. 252-0420 
Mooneyhan. James H., 8 10 Henry St., Franklin, 586-4989, 

586-4451 
Moore. James Patrick. Jr.. 1734 Gett3'sburg Rd., Lexington, 

278-3960, 252-2250 ext. 3162 
Mordica, William A., 800 Edgewood Ave., Ashland, 324-7741 
Morgan, R=chard. Route No. 6, Box 64. London, 864-6511, 864- 

2181 
Morris, Gene L.. 302 Wilson Court. Huntinerton, W. Va. 
Morrissev Rockne, 4824 Harlou, Dayton, Ohio 254-4395, 271- 

0343 
Morse, P'-hard K.. 163 North Deepwood, Radcliff, 351-3748. 

Ft. Knox 4-4454 
Moss. Howard. Box 1042, Paducah. 898-3168. 442-4474 
Mouser. H. D., 899 McPherson, Madisonville. TA 1-4864, SW 

7-3481 
Mueller, Dick. 2059 Oleander. Lexington. 227-5924. 254-1360 
Mullins. B. E.. Box A Paintsville, 789-4610. 789-3580 
Muntan, Peter J., 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville. 368-8296. 

ME 7-7621 



Murray, Thomas, 25 Ashton Ed., So. Ft. Mitchell, 331-1S91 
Nassida, Frank R., W. Oak St., Berea 086-3446 986-3521 
Neal, Gene, 3648 SR 132, Route No. 1, Batavia, Ohio, 753- 

5908. 242-6151 
Nickell, Carl Duane, 2009 Broad St.. Paducah, 444-6095 
Noland, Douglas, 305 Herndon, Stanford, 365-2609, 365-2619 
Nord, Bertrand J.. 4206 Naomi Drive. Louisville, 969-3369, 

587-1551 
Nord. Ed, 7005 Green Manor Dr.. Louisville, 239-9150, S95- 

3401 ext. 202 
Nord. Gilbert, 6315 Krause Ave., Louisville, 447-3133 
Norwood, Thomas R., 811 Henry St., Franklin, 586-3614. 586- 

3541 
Nutter, Larry E., 908 North 16th St.. Mayfield. 247-4605 
Odil, William Randall, 915 Plum Springs Rd., Bowling Green, 

843-3633, 842-9471 
Oldham, Ben, 516 Estill Court, Georgetown. 923, 139 
Omer, Harold G., 150 North Crestmoor, Louisville, 896-4170 

774-6505 
O'Nan. Norman, 3020 Elmwood. Henderson. 7-3968, 6-9056 
O'Neal, Bud, 3628 Kelly Way, Louisville, 468-7940, TW 5- 

6765 
Osborne, Ted G.. Box 806. Lexington, 266-6152, 266-6152 
Overby, H. E., 1931 Upland Dr.. Nashville, Tenn., 228-1629 
Owens, Charles C, Jr.. 2656 Chesterfield Ave., Huntington, 

W. Va. 
Owens. R. L., Jr.. Seventeenth. Corbin, 528-4426, 528-2330 
Pace, Donald, 2023 Deauville, Lexington, 252-6535, 265-0398 
Parker. Bob L., 8602 Honor, Louisville, 969-9090, JU 7-1121 

ext. 294 
Parker. Francis V., East Main, Providence 

Parsley, Clyde E., Route No. 2. Providence, G67-2524. 821-9004 
Pate, Lloyd W., 608 Ronnie Rd., Madison, 895-3522. 895-5472 
Peecher, W. Lloyd, 5928 Woodland. Seiotoville, Ohio, 776- 

9075, 776-9075 
Peeno, Harry, 30 Butler, Ludlow, JU 1-7335 
Pegausch, William E., 618 Brookhavan. Mayfield, 247-5932. 

247-2267 
Perry. Tom. Route No. 2, Box 494, Mt. Sterling, 1466, 2486 
Pinson. Eugene, 3208 Hackworth St., Ashland, 324-6548, 324- 

3101 
Plate. Arthur C. 1126 Franklin, Cincinnati, Ohio, 242-5396, 

241-4114 
Porter, Charles E., 4306 Hawthorne Dr., Owensboro, 684-4455, 

684-6211 
Powell, Logan, 107 N. Broadway Park. Lexington, 252-7676 

(Bus.l 
Powers, Tom, 1920 Knollridge Lane, Cincinnati. Ohio, 321- 

0195 
Prather. Wilbur E., 1512 Berry Blvd, Louisville, 363-2908, 

585-5807 
Rapp, William, 215 Heplar, Ironton, Ohio. 532-1983, 532-7245 
Raque. Ron, 3606 Fincastle Rd., Louisville. 454-5781, 637-9171 
Ray, Bob, 407 Leyton Ave.. Louisville, 895-3654 895-3654 
Ray, Shirley G., 4902 Sturbridge Place. Owensboro, 684-8963. 

683-2481 
Reaves, F. B.. 5615-B Gilkey Loop, Ft. Knox, 4-4381, 4-2357 
Reddington, Jim. 3824 Glenside Place. Louisville, 462-9689 
Reece, Fred. 149 Elm, Versailles. 873-3623, 227-6676 
Reece, Jerry T., 318 West 3rd St., Lexington, 252-7195, 255- 

6666 
Reed, John R., Naples Road, Naples, 473-5549, 324-9835 
Reed. Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 441-4946, 

541-4507 
Reed. Nicholas T.. 6320 Hunters Grove Rd., Louisville, 447- 

8148, 921-1900 
Renfro, John E.. 445 Florence Ave., Williamsburg, 6488. 6808 
Rentz, Thomas W., 161 Chenault Rd.. Lexington. 266-8242 
Richardson, Dennis C. Jr., 1122 Savannah Dr.. New Albany, 

Ind., WH 5-9457 
Riggins. Jason M., Box 2591, Williamson, W. Va. 
Riggs, William T., 103 W. McElroy, Morganfield, 389-2210, 

389-2210 
Ring, Bill, 4 8 1 Rookwood Parkway, Lexington. 299-7089. 

254-1776 
Rodgers. Tom H.. 721 Park Court. Madisonville. 821-7312 
Robinson. Don L., 1906V' Walnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Roettger, W. H.. 2856 Hikes Lane, Louisville, GL 1-9177. JU 

4-4006 
Roof, Jerry C, 447 University, Louisville, 896-9057, 896-9057 
Rose, Bernard. Lothair. 436-4800 

Ross. Roy G., 898 Orchard Park, Hurricane, W. Va. 
Russell. Gai-y Evan. 2112 Gregory Dr., Henderson, 827-1491 
Russell, Joe. Brookhaven Drive. Russellville, 726-6983, 726-6983 
Russman, Godfrey F., 1041 Goss Ave., Louisville, 969-2175, 

635-7426 
St. Clair. James W.. 1600 Fifth Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Sallee, Alan L.. 1737 Deer Park, Louisville, GL 1-6478 (Bus.) 
.Candors. Mel. 3910 Sunset, Paducah, 442-3630. Brookport, III., 

4441 
Sapp. Edward, 2806 Dell Brooke, Louisville, 458-8989. 104- 

7511 ext. 4708 
Sawyer, Thomas G., Route No. 1 Shawnee Heights, Winfield. 

W. Va. 
Schad. Jnm, 10717 Chelmsford Rd.. Cincinnati. Ohio, 825-3343 
Schai-fenberger, Ii-v., 8195 Clippinger Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

561-6378. 561-6378 
.Schierirg. Jack H., 6948 Terrylnn Lane, i' iucinnati, Ohio. 

681-2272, 251-4828 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



Schlich, Paul E., 3315 Dean Drive, Louisville, 458-6765, 896-0211 
Schlosser, J. Paul, 1971 N. Lynndale, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521- 

6162, 521-6162 
Schmitt, K. F.. 710 Walnut, Louisville 
Sehmitt, Paul E., 3864 Darlene Drive, Louisville, 778-5365, 

635-5251 
Schrecker, Dennis R.. 1377 South 2nd, Louisville, 634-3741, 

634-3741 
Schuble. Charles E., 2352 Ashwood Dr., Louisville, 469-1774, 

636-1431 
Schwetschenau, Paul, 7013 Clovernoll Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

931-3648, 761-4100 ext. 3833 
Sconce, John, 162 East Main, Lynch, 848-2701 
Scott, W. L., 1816 McDonald Ed., Lexington, 278-2844, 252- 

3595 
Seale, William E.. Route No. 5, Tates Creek Rd., Lexington, 

266-6695. 255-3600 ext. 5536 
Sellman, John B., 4031 Gilman Ave., Louisville, 897-2757, 

682-2028 
Shanks, Thomas E., 3113 Vogue Ave., Louisville, 454-4203, 

458-5502 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370. 548-2208 
Shaw, John H., 219 E. Lee St., Mayfield 
Sherman, Jem', Box 648, Williamson, W. Va. 
Shirley, Machael D., Jr., 9818 Caven Ave., Louisville, 969-8801 
Showalter, John, 116 Military, Georgetown, 662 
Sloan, Wally, 419 Oread Rd., Louisville, 896-1126, 583-0621 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville, 458-1286, 

366-0396 
Smith, Sp|4 Richard T., EA-15521269, Co. A, 1st Bn, 707th 

Armor, APO New York, N. Y. 
Smith, W. Jack, 2 3 Ohio St., Somerset, 670-1211, Russell 

Springs, 866-4863 
Snook, Patrick, 6309 Six Mile Lane, Louisville. 451-9423, 366- 

9611 
Snvder, Gus, 2420 Adams, Ashland, 324-7927, 324-1111 ext. 

6647 
South, Stanley Parks, 116 Long Ave., Winchester, 744-5753, 

744-4812 ext. 47 
Speck, Michael E., 205 Sunset, Elizabethtown, 765-6386, 862- 

1924 
Stanfill, William, 1205 Providence, Lexington, 266-5278, 256- 

3600 ext. 5977 
Staten, Joseph B., 128 Mills Drive, Louisville 
Steele, Ronald, 6108 W. Pages, Pleasure Ridge Park, 937-8041 
Stephens, HeHrbert D., 133 First St. West, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Stephens, Robert J., Box 527, Charlton Heights, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry, 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1767, 256- 

2960 
Stevens, William D., 1033 Clairborne Way, Lexington, 266- 

2678, 299-1221 ext. 2223 
Strain, Richard, Box 62, Triangle Trailer Park, Radcliff, 351- 

4306 
Strong, Arnett, 116 Kentucky Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436-2141 
Sucietto, Richard, 6572 Gaines Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 521-7495, 

521-4280, ext. 379 
Sullivan, A. G., 211 Goodwin Ave., Corbin, 528-1282, 528-9035 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 2083 Old Nassau Rd., Lexixngton, 277- 

6963, Frankfort 223-8221 ext. 761 
Swarts, Joseph, 135 Lane St., Ironton, Ohio, 632-9349 
Swinford, John. 202 S. Elmarch, Cynthiana, 234-2562, 234-5821 
Tackett, Jay, Route No. 3 Georgetown. 832-6663 
Talbot, William G., Ill, Route No. 1, Paris, 987-2452, 987-2961 
Taylor, Ronald Louis, Co. A. Special Troops, USAARMC, Ft. 

Knox, 942-2054, 4-3745 
Tehan, James, 140 15th St., Newport, 291-1309 261-0046 
Thomas, Charles, 410 E. Drive, Fulton, 472-3662, 472-1637 
Thomas, Frank M., 629I3 South 44th St., Louisville, 774-2624, 

778-9167 
Thomas, Raymond E., 1106 Main, Sturgis, 333-2151, VA 7-9891 
Thompson, Jack F., Jr.. 1310 Rammers, Ave., Louisville, ME 

4-3517, JU 4-6311 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 462-9256 
Thompson, Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, 251-3394 
Thompson, Tom, 1113 Cleveland Ave., Park Hills, Covington, 

431-6961, 331-1651 
Timmering, George E., 228 Roney Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

2198, 886-1922 
Tolley. D. E.. 196 Wilderness Rd., Lowry Hills, Bristol, Vir- 
ginia, 669-4169, 669-4851 
Trautwein, Jim, 4313 Martha Ave., Louisville, 468-7438, 464- 

3449 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green St., Fulton, 472-1604. 472-1836 
Trimer, Norman E., 1927 Taffeta Dr., Valley Station, 937- 

6672, 43332 
Troutman, Bill. P. O. Box 266. Kenvir, 837-2632 
Troutman, Doyle C. Box 304, Harlan, 573-1349, 573-1950 



Trunzo, Nicholas P., 1015 Elaine Dr., Louisville, 969-0669, 

GL 4-7511 ext. 3012 
Tully, William P., 2936 Hughes St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Tussey, George. Jr., Route No. 2, Box lOOB, Catlettsburg, 

739-4617 
Van Hoose. Jack D., 106 Short, Faintsville, 789-4896, 789-3581 
Vankirk, Alvia S., 107 S. Poplar Ave., Corbin, 528-2338, 528- 

3131 
Van Meter, David ., 3148 Talisman Rd., Louisville, 454-4030 
Van Zant. Jim, Box 602, Williamson, W. Va. 
Varner, Gene. Pike Street, Cynthiana, 234-2030, 234-1631 
Varner, Ray G.. 327 Bonita, Ridgecrest, California 
Vaughan, Dick, 713 — 13th St., Ashland, 324-5076, 324-5155 
Vennari. Paul, Box 13, Beckley, W. Va., 253-8487 253-4722 
Vennell, Robert H., 2065 Donald Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Vinciguerra, Philip. Matewan, W. Va. 
Vissman, Charles F., 1509 Arcade, Apt. No. 4, Louisville, 366- 

0832. JU 7-1121 ext. 472 
Wagner. Jim, 3018 Dale Ann Dr., louisvlile, 458-9060 
Waide, HariT D., 260 E. Arch, Madisonville, 821-1998, 821-3870 
Walker. Julian R., 6 7 Hill-n-Dale, Lexington, 277-7269, 

Frankfort, 227-2231 ext. 534 
Walker, Paul R., 625 Meadowlawn, Bowling Green, 843-8898, 

843-3249 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123, 299- 

6123 
Wanchic, Nick, 1611 Forbes Rd., Lexington, 256-1233 252-8328 
Warfield, James A., 4472-B Gaffey Heights, Ft. Knox, 942- 

3380, 4-3336 
Warren, Kenneth A., 45 Meadowview Drive, Louisville, 454- 

6001, 634-1551 ext. 258 
Washaleski, Thomas, 4003 Dellafay, Louisville, 964-6920, JTJ 

4-5269 
Washer, James P., 4119 Sunflower, Louisville, 447-6817, 637- 

0396 
Washer, Stanley, 3206 Huberta Dr., Louisville, 447-3078, 774- 

2341 ext. 324 
Watts, Shirley, 802 Carneal, Lexington, 255-2743, 262-5494 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, Box 264, Williamson, W. Va. 
Webb, Ralph Dudley, 1556 Alexandria, Lexington, 277-9523, 

Georgetown 177 
Welch, Bill, 1324 Beech, Cincinnati, Ohio. 471-8090, 921-9722 
Welch, J. D., 2508 Forest Ave., Ashland, 324-3337, 324-1165 

ext. 367 
Werkowitz, Jack, 4614 Miller, Blue Ash, Ohio, 791-5382, 791- 

5870 
White, James, 401-C Smith Ave., Cumberland, 589-4987, 848- 

6486 
Whittemore. Paul F., 2TRS 374, USMA, West Point, New 

York, 3360, 3809 
Wickham, James Robert. 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 

348-6282, 833-4612 
Wilkerson, Benjamin P., 1509 Southfield Rd., Evansville, In- 
diana, GR 6-4560, UL 3-3381 
Willey, Harold L., 2214 Inwood Dr., Huntington, W. Va. 
Williams. Bert O., 953- Lucy Lane, Lexington, 264-8773, 252- 

2626 
Williams, Gene, 304 Deepwood Drive, Elizabethtown, 765-4191, 

765-4831 
Williams, James H., Elmwood Drive, South Shore, 932-4372, 

932-3055 
Willis, Donald A., Allen, 874-2485, 285-3407 
Wilson, John Pope, 812 East Mraket St., Louisville, 585-4691, 

585-4691 
Wilson, Louis O., 728 Wellington Way, Lexington, 277-6374, 

254-1715 
Wise. Billy V.. 240 St. Ann St., Lexington, 266-7449, 252-5492 
Wise, Jack, 409 Fountain, Georgetown, 2052, 120 
Wray, Robert, 29 Belle Monte, So. Ft. Mitchell, 331.«!594, 341- 

4579 
Wright, James Lloyd, 121 Showalter, Georgetown, 2344 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 East 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-0526, 

381-1232 
Wyatt, William J., 1921 Oxford Circle, Lexington, 262-4260, 

252-4260 
Yanity, Joseph B., Jr., 42 Utah Place, Athens, Ohio, LY 2- 

9201, LY 3-4631 
Zaranka. Benny J., 165 St. William Drive, Lexington, 266-6436, 

256-6666 
Zehner, Albert. 9801 Watterson Lane, Jeffersontown, 267- 

1677 458-9363 
Zimmer, Tom. 3530 Cherry Tree Lane, Erlanger, 341-4566, 

431-4272 
Zlamal, Raymond D.. 1101 Johnson, Ave., Box 285, Lynch, 

848-5966 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



Page Nine 



FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

6. For each victory of a second division team over 
a second division team the winner gets 20 points and 
the loser gets 10 points. 

7. For each tie between second division teams each 
team gets 15 points. 

8. For each tie between a first division team and a 
second division team the first division team, gets 15 
points and the second division team gets 20 points. 

Section II 

1. No team shall be penalized for a victory in an 
extra game. To avoid this, the extra game shall be 
omitted from calculation. 

2. If two second division teams have won the same 
number of victories over first or second division teams, 
but have lost a different number of games to first divi- 
sion teams, the extra defeats shall be omitted from the 
calculations. 

Section III 

1. An undefeated team shill always be ranked above 
every team it has defeated, even though the average 
number of "points" in the season's ratings may indi- 
cate otherwise. 

2. A team with a percentage of .500 is in the second 
division. It will be considered to be in the first division 
if one third of its games have been with first division 
teams and have resulted in at least one tie and one 
victory. 

3. If, in a game having a bearing on the champion- 
ship, a first division team should profit by tying anoth- 
er team in the first division, when defeating it would 
lower the defeated team into the second division, the 
place of the teams in their division shall be determined 
without considering the games. 

4. A team undefeated in its district, which has 
played at least three games with teams in its district, 
sheJl rank above all teams in its district which it has 
defeated. 

Section IV 

1. If the foregoing directions have been accurately 
followed, the final standing may be determined by 
getting the average number of points. 

2. If two teams have the same average points for 
the entire season, the victor in the game played be- 
tween them during the regular season shall be ranked 
above the loser. 

3. If three teams have the same number of 
"points" for the entire season, and two of them have 
played each other, the loser in this game shall be 
ranked third and the other two tied for the highest 
rank. 

(Do not attempt to apply this system until aU of the 
games of the season have been played.) 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Two) 

The Commissioner reported the results of a refer- 
endum which had been sent on May 17, 1965, to mem- 
bers of the Board of Control concerning certain addi- 
tional changes in 1965-66 basketball redistricting, sug- 
gested by Messrs. Teater, Sanders, Rawlings, and 
Combs. The recommendations had been as follows: 

D. 59— Dorton, HeUier, Mullins, Pikeville, Virgie; 

D. 60— Belfry, Elkhom City, Feds Creek, Johns 
Creek, Phelps; 

Move Oldham County from D. 30 to D. 31; 

Move Owen County from D. 31 to D. 32; 

Move Rockcaskle County from D. 48 to D. 49. 

The Commissioner reported that the vote of Board 



members was a unanimous one in favor of the changes 
recommended. 

The Commissioner presented a suggested 
K.H.S.A.A. budget for the 1965-66 school year, with 
estimated receipts of $168,600.00 and estimated dis- 
bursements of $166,900.00. After a study of various 
items of the proposed new budget, Preston Holland 
moved, seconded by Sherman Gish, that the 1965-66 
K.H.S.A.A. budget presented by the Commissioner be 
adopted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish and other members of the Board 
gave a report on the recent National Federation Meet- 
ing, held at Williamsburg, Virginia. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, 
that the fall meeting of the Board of Control he held 
in Lexington on October 9. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that several K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools not maintaining boys' basketball 
teeuns should have basketball district assignments, for 
the purpose of being listed in the January issue of the 
ATHLETE. He recommended the following district as- 
signments: D. 21 — Loretto; D. 23— Holy Rosary Acad- 
emy; D. 25 — ^Academy of Our Lady of Mercy, Kentucky 
School for the Blind, Presentation Academy, Ursuline 
Academy; D. 26— Angela Merici, K. M. I., Sacred 
Heart Academy, The Kentucky Home School for Girls; 
D. 27— Louisville Collegiate School; D. 34— Villa Ma- 
donna Academy. Mr. Combs moved, seconded by Don 
Davis, that the schools involved be assigned to the 
districts recommended by the Commissioner. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that, in his opinion, the 
time had come lor the K.H.S.A.A. to begin registering 
baseball umpires. A requirement that only registered 
umpires be used by Association member schools in 
1966 should not be made, but it was the Commis- 
sioner's opinion that the Board should present a pro- 
posal to the next Delegate Assembly, calling for such 
a requirement in the school year 1966-67. Morton 
Combs moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, that the 
Commissioner be directed to set up clinics and begin 
registering baseball umpires during the second semes- 
ter of the current school year. The motion was carried 
unan;mously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Ralph C. 
Dorsey, that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning April 9, 1965, and ending June 30, 1965, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



SWIMMING REGULATIONS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

400 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard Breaststroke, 200 Yard 
Freestyle Relay. 

VIII. Scoring 

Contestants finishing in the first six places shall be 
awarded points as follows: 7, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. The points 
for relays are: 14, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2. 

IX. Champion 

The champion will be the team with the greatest 
number of points. 

X. Expense Allowances 

A contestant who qualifies for the finals will be 
given an e.xpense allowance. The coach will also le- 
ceive an expense allowance. 

XI. Trophies and Awards 

Trophies wiU be given to the winning team and to 
the runner-up. Awards will be given to the first three 
finishing in each event. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Governing Track Meets (Boys & Girls) 

(Adopted by the Board of Control) 

Regional Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the meets shall be deter- 
mined by the Commissioner wth the approval of the 
Board of Control. All meets will be held on or as near 
the dates indicated on the activities calendar as local 
conditions permit. 

II. Assignment of Schools to Regions 

The state shall be divided into track classes and 
regions by the Commissioner who will assign the- 
schools to the regional sites. 

III. Regional Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each region. It is the duty of the manager to notifj" the 
regional schools of the time and place of the meet, tc 
supply them with entrj- blanks, to inxate their pai'tici- 
pation, and to make all arrangements for the meet. 

IV. Contestants 

A school maj enter one or two contestants in each 
event and one team in each relay race. Five partici- 
pants may bf named to a relay team, any four of 
whom may be used in a heat or in the finals. 

V. Substitutes 

Any contestant whose name is on the eligibUity list 
may be substituted for the original entry prior to the 
time of the event involved. 

VI. Events 

Only the following events shall constitute regional 
meets: (Boys) 120 yd. Hurdles, 100 yd. Dash, One-Mile 
Run, Half-Milo Relay, 440 yd. Dash, 180 yd. Hurdles, 
Two-Mile Run, 880 yd. Run, 220 yd. Dash, Mile Relay, 
Shot, Pole Vault, Discus {rubber or rubber-covered, 
jimior size). High Jump, Broad Jump, (Girls) 50 yd. 
Hurdles 660 yd. Run, 50 yd. Dash, 440 yd. Run, 75 yd. 
Dash, 100 yd. Dash, 220 yd. Dash, 440 yd. Relay, 880 
Medley Relay, Softball Throw, Standing Broad Jump, 
High Jump, Shot, Long Jump, Discus. 

VII. Rules 

National Alliance Track and Field rules shall gov- 
ern in boys' competition and DGWS rules shall govern 
in girls' competition unless there are exceptions stated 
in these regulations. 

VIII. Number of Events Contestant May Enter 

In any meet (boys) a contestant may compete in 
not more than four events. A contestant who partici- 
pates in the 880, one mile run or two mile run shall 
not be allowed to participate in any other track event 
in which he runs 880 or more yards. In any meet 
(girls) a contestant may compete in not more than 
three events. 

IX. Scoring 

Four places shall count in the scoring in each 
event with values of 5-3-2-1. 

X. State Qualifying 

The winner in each event qualifies for the State 
Track Meet. 

XI. State Information and Entry Blanks 

State information and entry blanks shall be secured 
from the regional manager. The completed form shall 
be given to the regional manager at the close of the 
meet. 

XII. Faculty Sponsor 

Each school having participants in the meet shall 
send a faculty sponsor. 
Xill. Medals and Trophies 

Medals shall be awarded for the first four places 
in each event. Trophies shall be awarded the winning 
and mnner-up teams. 



State Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the meets shall be deter- 
mined by the Commissioner with the approval of the 
Board of Control. 

II. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each of the meets. 

III. Contestants 

In each event the contestants are relay teams and 
individuals who have finished first in a regional meet. 
A contestant must finish in the event or events in 
which he or she qualified or be disqualified from the 
relays. 

IV. Substitutes 

The relay team need not be composed of the same 
contestants as those in the regional meet. Five partici- 
pants may be named to a relay team, any four of 
whom may be used in a heat or in the finals. 

V. Events 

The events in the state meet shall be the same as 
those listed in the regional regulations. 

VI. Rules 

National Alliance Track and Field rules shall gov- 
ern in boys' competition and DGWS rules shall govern 
in girls' competition unless there are exceptions stated 
in these regulations. 

VII. Number of Events Contestant May Enter 

The number of events which a contestant may 
enter shall be the same as that given in the regional 
regulations. 

VIII. Scoring 

Five places shall count in the scoring in each event 
with values of 54-3-2-1. 

IX. Expense Allowance 

A contestant who finishes first in a regional event 
will receive an allowance for expenses. The coach will 
also receive an expense allowance. 

X. Faculty Sponsor 

Each school having participants in the meet shall 
send a faculty sponsor. 

XI. Trophies and Awards 

Trophies will be awarded to the winning team and 
the runner-up. Individual awards shall be given for the 
first five places in each event. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Governing the State Rifle Tournament 

(Adopted by the Board of Control) 

I. Date and Site 

The date and site of the tournament shall be deter- 
mined by the Commissioner with the approval of the 
Board of Control. 

II. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for the 
tournament. 

III. Contestants 

A school may enter a team of five firing members. 

IV. Substitutes 

Any player whose name is on the eligibility list 
may substitute on the team prior to the match. 

V. Course of Fire 

Ten shots for record wiU be fired from each posi- 
tion: prone, kneeling and standing. 

VI. Firing Time and Squadding 

Firing time and squadding will be determined by 
the manager. 

VII. Scoring 

Scoring will be done by the statistical section. 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



Page Eleven 



VIII. Expense Allowance 

Each team and its coach will receive an expense 
allowance. 

IX. Trophies and Awards 

School trophies will be given to the winning team 
and the runner-up. An award will be given to the in- 
dividual with the highest score. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Governing Golf Tournaments (Boys & Girls) 

(Adopted by the Board of Control) 

Regional Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates cind sites of the tournaments shall be 
deteremined by the Commissioner with the approval of 
the Board of Control. All events will be held on or as 
near the dates indicated on the activities calendar as 
local conditions permit. 

II. Assignment of Schools to Regions 

The state shall be divided into golf regions by the 
Commissioner who wiU assign the schools to the tourn- 
ament sites. 

III. Regional Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each of the regions. It is the duty of the manager to 
notify the regional schools of the time and place of the 
tournament, to supply them with entry blanks, to in- 
vite their participation, and to make all arrangements 
for the tournament. 

IV. Contestants 

A school may enter four players as a team, or 
more than three players as individuals. A school may 
not enter any players in addition to a team. 

V. Substitutes 

Any player whose name is on the eUgibUity list 
may be substituted on the team prior to time of play. 

VI. Pairings 

The tournament manager will arrange the players 
in threesomes, based on their average scores, with no 
two contestants from one school in the same group. 

VII. Rules 

The club pro and tournament manager shall de- 
termine whether summer or winter rules will be fol- 
lowed. During play no contestant shaU receive instruc- 
tions from a coach or any other person. In a boys 
tournament, each player shall carry his clubs or use 

VIII. Style of Play 

Medal play for 18 holes is the style of play. 

IX. Champions 

Tournament champions are the four-man team 
with the lowest aggregate score for 18 holes, and the 
individual with the lowest score. 

X. State Qualifying 

The winning and runner-up teams qualify for the 
first round of the State Tournament. Also quaUiying 
will be the 5 players, not on the winning and runner- 
up teams, with the lowest scores. 

XI. State Information Entry Blanks 

The coaches shall secure entry blanks from the 
regional manager before leaving the site of the tourna- 
ment. 

XII. Faculty Sponsor 

Each school having participants in the tourna- 
ment shall send a faculty sponsor. 

XIII. Trophies and Awards 

School trophies will be given to the individual and 
team winners and runners-up. Awards will be given to 
the individual winner and runner-up, and to the mem- 
bers of the winning and runner-up teams. 



State Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the tournaments shall be 
determined by the Commissioner with the approval of 
the Board of Control. 

II. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each of the tournaments. 

III. Contestants 

Eligible to enter the first round are teams and in- 
dividuals, who qualifed in regional tournaments. Eligi- 
ble to enter the second round (boys) are the ten teams, 
and ten individuals regardless of their teams' scores, 
with the lowest scores after the first round. Eligible to 
enter the second round (girls) are all contestants who 
complete the first round. 

IV. Substitutes 

Any player whose name is on the ehgibihty list 
may be substituted on the team prior to time of play. 

V. Pairings 

The tournament manager, for the first round, wiU 
arrange the players in groups, based on their regional 
scores, with no two contestants from one school in 
the same group. Second round pairings wiU be made at 
the close of the first 18 holes. 

VI. Rules 

The club pro and tournament manager wiU deter- 
mine whether summer or winter rules wiU be followed. 
During play no contestant shall receive instructions 
from a coach or any other person. In a boys' tourna- 
ment, each plaver shall carry his clubs or use a cart. 

VII. Style of Play 

Medal play, 36 holes, 18 of which are to be played 
each day, is the style of play. 

VIII. Champion 

Tournament champions are the four-player team 
with the lowest aggregate score for 36 holes, and the 
individual with the lowest score. 

IX. Expense Allowance 

The individual winner and members of the cham- 
pionship team in the regional tournament will receive 
expense allowances. The coach will also receive an 
expense allowance. 

X. Faculty Sponsor 

Each school having participants in the tournament 
shall send a faculty sponsor. 

XI. Trophies and Awards 

School trophies wiU be given to the individual and 
team winners and runners-up. Awards wiU be given to 
the individual winner and runner-up, and to the mem- 
bers of the winning and runner-up teams. 



1965 FOOTBALL CASE BOOK CORRECTIONS 

Play 21— The last line of the niling should read as 
follows: "In (b), it is A's ball on B's 30, 1st and 10." 

Play 24— The last line of the ruling should read as 
follows: "B is then penalized half the distance to its 
goal, B's ball, 1st and 10 on its llVz." 

Play 25— The last line of the first paragraph of the 
comment should read: "If A then fouls after the ball 
is dead " 



FOOTBALL DISTRICT CHANGES 

To be added to the list of football schools printed in 
the August issue of the ATHLETE are the following: 
Berea— A, Region II, District 2; Meade County— AA, 
Region n. District 1; Simon Kenton— AA, Region HI, 
District 1; Whitley County— AA, Re^on IV, District 1. 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1965 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Dr. Lexington, Ky. 

In Stock For Immediate Delivery 

by U. P. S. 

Spanjian #806 Pants-Football $ 5.95 ea. 

Red Fox White Football Jersies, (Practice) $ 1.95 ea. 

Riddell & Hyde Football Shoes $10.95 up 

Puma Shoes $ 8.96 ea. 

Riddell White Helmets— We stripe (1) free $18.95 ea. 

All Star Socks, Sized $ 4.50 doz. 

Bike & Cramer Products 
DCP & Riddell Shoulder Pads 

J5V & TD Footballs Special Price 

Riddell Kicking Toe & Coach's Shoes 

White Football Jersies $ 7.55 ea. 

Shur-Fit Mouthpieces $ 1.35 ea. 

Scrimmage Vests $12.75 doz. 

Trophies, All kinds & Prices — We engrave at our store. 

Blazers — Adults (kids available) $18.95 ea. 

We screen print our own sweat shirts 

2-3 week service — 36 minimum $ 1.95 ea. 

Coat style Sweaters in many colors 

in stock for immediate shipment $12.50 ea. 

V-neck White Sweaters — also $ 8.25 & up 

6" Chenille Letters — 2 weeks Plain ^ 1.35 ea. 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 277-3977 Dick Wallace 



FILMS 



FOOTBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

In the film an extrovert "Old Grad" chooses 

The films listed below are in the Film Library Football Rules as quiz show category. His experience 

of the University of Kentucky College of Education, with official interpretations proves interesting, humor- 

The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a," refer to elementary, junior ous and embarrasing. At the end, he realizes his 

high, senior high, college and adult audiences who knowledge is very meager on such thmgs as — officials 

may enjoy Hie particular film listed. The rental prices and their duties — what constitutes pass interference 

shown do not apply to schools which use one of the — rights on muffed punt — etc., and his wife had to 

special subscription service plans, offered by the take over for him. 

Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. OFFICIAL FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Football '^'^^^ ^'^ portrays the play situations covering the 

basic rules of football as played under the National 

BALL HANDLING IN FOOTBALL j-s-c-a 1 reel $1 50 Alliance Code. The theme is centered around the offl- 

Fundamentals of ball handhng are stressed; 'stance fi^I interpretations of the rules as they apply to the 

grip, "feel" of the baU, finger-tip control adjustment tl^^ee teams always present on the field, the home 

before throwing or kicking, receiving passes from team, the visitmg team and that all important third 

center or from a back, catching passes and punts, ways team, the officials. 

of carrying ball, and changing from one hand to TACKLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
another. Game shots are presented, using slow motion Tackling properly is shown as the result of appli- 
and stop action techniques, and superimposed anima- nation of certain fundamentals: good physical condi- 
tion to lUustrate principles. ti<,n^ spggj^ bo^y placement, drive, sure grip, timing, 
BLOCKING IN FOOTBALL i-s-c-a 1 reel $1 50 ™<^ ^^'^^ control. Shoulder and cross body tackles are 
„ J ^ , . ,',,,.' ,' ,',..,. demonstrated in various ways, with special instruc- 
Fundamentals of good bloclcng are taught in this ^^^^^ foj. ^l^^ a„j j^g^ns of a reducing shock, 
film: position, speed, drive, follow-through, timing, 

and body control. Describes shoulder and body blocks, THIS IS FOOTBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels color, $1.00 
demonstrating several varieties of these. Importance Centered around the four S's — Science, speed, 

of good physical condition, practice, and experience skUl, and safety. Demonstrations cover basic rules 

are emphasized. Special photography used to illustrate that will aid the official, coach, players, and fan. 

different points. Play situations are used to establish standards. 



AS WE BEGIN OUR THIRTEENTH YEAR OF 
PROVIDING STUDENT AND ATHLETIC IN- 
SURANCE COVERAGE AND SERVICE TO 
KENTUCKY SCHOOLS, WE WANT TO EX- 
PRESS OUR THANKS TO YOU, OUR VALUED 
CUSTOMERS, AND WISH YOU A SUCCESS- 
FUL SCHOOL YEAR. WE APPRECIATE 
YOUR CONFIDENCE AND THE FINE JOB 
YOU ARE DOING FOR THE CHILDREN OF 
OUR STATE. 



7<4e KUu^de4t Go-Htpximf, 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 255-0837 

P. O. BOX 7100 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

Mayfield, Kentucky 

Ch 7-1941 Ch 7-1942 

Whether your order is for a few special items, or for outfitting a complete 
team, we give undivided and personal attention to every order that comes 
to our store. We have the most complete stock for team equipment in the 
south. 

We are distributors for the VERY BEST MANUFACTURERS of athletic 
goods such as: 



SECO 

MacGREGOR 

SPALDING 

KING-0'SHEA 

RIDDELL 

VOIT 

FAIR PLAY 

HILLERICH & BRADSBY 

SPANJIAN 



CONVERSE 

E. R. MOORE CO. 

BIKE 

CRAMER 

WIGWAM 

NELSON 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON 

SOUTHERN 

LYON METAL 



We try to make our SERVICE match the quality of the items we sell, 
and are now in position to guarantee overnight delivery to any place in 
the State of Kentucky. Furthermore, each and every item we sell 
is fully guaranteed. 

If you would like to see our salesman for football or basketball equip- 
ment, call Ed Hendley in Louisville at 451-0576. 

Roy Boyd, Jim Mitchell, Billy Farmer and C. A. Byrn are always glad 
to help you in Mayfield. Call collect, or come by and let them help you 
with your needs. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS, Inc. 

CH 71941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

We Ship The DaV You BuV 





HiqhSchoolAthMe 



The Player . . . 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without hoasting, he loses without excuses and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach . . . 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type man he wants his boys to be. 



The OHicial . . . 



1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator . . . 



1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

October, 1965 



K.H.S.A.A. Football Schools 

(Asterisks Indicate 8 man Football Schools) 

SCHOOL ADDRESS COACH 



Anderson 


Lawrencehurf 


Atherton 


Louisville 


Austin-Tracy' 


Lucas 


Barbourville 


Barbourville 


Bardstown 


Bardstown 


Bath Count} 


Owingsville 


Beechwood 


S. Ft. Mitch 


Belfry 


Belfry 


Bell County 


Pinevillc 


Bellevue 


Bellevue 


Berea 


Berea 


Boone Count} 


Florence 


Bourbon Count 


Paris 


Bowling- Greei. 


Bowlinp Glee 


Boyd County 


Ashland 


Boyle County 


Danville 


Bryan Statioi. 


Lexinptni 


Buvgin 
Butler 


BuvKin 
Louisvill. 


Caldwell Count, 


Princetoii 


Campbell Couni/ 


AlexandriL 


Campbellsville 


Camphellsxill 


Carroll Count} 


CarroUton 


Catlettsburc 


Catiettsburp 


Caverna' 


Horse Cav. 


Central 


Louisville 


Christian Count 


Hopkinsville 


Corbin 


Corbin 


Crittenden Count 


Marion 


Cumberland 


Cumberlan. 


Cumberland Coun 


} Burkesvill, 


Danville 


Danville- 


Daviess Count} 


Owensborc 


Davton 


Dayton 


De Sales 


Louisville 


Dixie Heights 


S. Ft. Mitche 


DuPont ManuM 


Louisville 


Durrett 


Louisville 


Eastern 


Louisville 


Elizabethtowr, 


Elizabethtowi 


Elkhorn City 


Elkhorn Cit} 



Fairelale 


Fairdale 


Falmouth 


Falmoutli 


Fern Creek 


Fern Creek 


Flaget 


Ixjuisville 


Fleming Count: 


FlemingsburK 


Fleming-Neon 


Fleming 


Fort Campbell 


Fort Camii'oe 


P"ort Knox 


Fort Kno^ 


Frankfort 


Frankforl 


Franklin County 


Frankfort 


Franklin-Simpsor. 


Franklin 


Fulton 


Fulton 


Fulton County 


Hickman 


Gamaliel" 


Gamaliel 


Garrard County 


Lancaster 


George Rogers Cla 


rk Winchester 


Georgetown 


Georgetown 


Glasgow 


Glasgow 


Greensburg 


Greensburg 


Hall 


Grays Knob 


Harlan 


Harlan 


Harrison County 


Cynthiana 


Harrodsburg 


Harrodsburg 


Hazard 


Hazard 


Hazel Green 


East Bernsla. 


Henderson 


Henderson 


Henderson Count> 


Henderson 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


Henry County 


New Castlo 


Highlands 


Fort Thomas 


Hidmes 


Covington 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 



Jenkins 

Jessamine County 
Johns Creek 



Bobbv Kincer 
Jack Kleier 
Jimmy Manioi. 

H. W. TWe 
Garnis Martin 
C. B. Bradshaw 
Tom Creamer 
Albert Vippermar. 
Cleo Pursifull 
Gene Foster 
Frank Nassids 
John Dorman 
Eugene Correll 
Richard Smithsor 
Tom Scott 
Dennis Sexton 
Virgil Chambers 
David Feeback 
Milan Perpich 

Fred R. Clayton 
Bob Miller 
Vincent Hancock 
Charles Gibson 
Jack Ison 
Jerome Ramsev 
John R. Rhodes 
David Holt 
Ledger Howard 
William Huff 
Needham Sayloi 
Dave Sharp 

Chester Caddas 
Waymond Morris 
Thomas Daley 
Tom Ososkie 
Charles R. Fugiti 
William Mitchell 
Bill Wvatt 



Charles Hord 
Bill Hogg 
William Duty 
Lloyd Block 
Charles Hunter 



Joseph Goodman 
John W. Farler 
Ed Orick 
Jim Kennedy 
"Buck" Vest 
Raymond Lsaacs 
Marshall Patterson 
Paul Jones 
O. C. Leathers 
Dick Roddy 
Bob Brown 
Frank McCann 
Jeff Lester 

Ray D. Coe 
Waddell Murphy 
Jerry Kirk 
Jack G. Massic 
Lawrence Gilbert 
Ivan Curnutte 



Roy Shoemate 
Dan Beasley 
William McKee 

E. G. Plu 
Aster Si; 
Hughes Bennett 
W. K. Dawson 
Mojo Hollowell 
James Poynter 
William E. Leedy 
Owen Hauck 
Tom Ellis 

F. D. Thornton, Jr 



Raymond Ricketts 
Elmer Stephenson 
John O'Brian 



Lafayette 

LaRue Counte 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 

Lily 

Lincoln Institute 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

M. C. Napiei 

Madison 

Madison Centra' 

Madisonvillc 

Male 

Mayfield 

Meade County 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe Count \ 

Middlesboro 

M. M. I. 

Me)ntgomerv Coi 

Morgan Countv 

Mt. Sterlint 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 



Newport 

Newport Catiioli 
Nicholas Counis 
North Hardin 
North Warren 

Old Ky. Home 
Oldham County 
Owen County 
Owensboro 



Park City" 
Paul G. Blazer 
P. L. Dunbar 
Pikeville 



Raceland 
Rowan County 
Russell 
Russellvilie 



Sayre 

Scott County 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby Countv 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Simon Kenton 

Somerset 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Tates Creek 
Tempple Hill* 
Thomas Jeffers 
Tompkinsville 
Trigg County 
Trinity 



Un 



County 



Valley 



Waggener 

Wallins 

Warren County 

Western 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Whitely County 

Williamsburg 

Woodford County 

Wurtland 



Le-xington 

Hodgenville 

Lebanon 

Hyden 

Lily 

Lincoln Ridg. 

Erlanger 

London 

Louisa 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lvnch 

Corbin 

South Shore 
Hazard 
Richmond 
Richmond 
Madisonville 
Louisville 
Mayfield 
Brandenburg 
Harrodsburg 
Edmonton 
Middlesboro 
Millersburg 
Illy Mt. Sterling 
West Libert^ 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Murray 

Newport 
Newport 
Carlisle 
Vine Grove 
Smiths Grove 

Bardstown 
LaGrange 
Owenton 
Owensboro 
die Owensboro 



Park City 
Ashland 

Pikeville 
Pineville 
Prestonsburg 



Russellvilie 

Bardstown 

Louisville 

Lexington 

Georgetown 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Shelbyville 

Shelbyville 

Sherpherdsville 

Independence 

Somerset 

Louisville 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Le.xington 

Glasgow 

Louisville 

Tompkinsville 

Cadiz 

Louisville 



Valley Station 

Louisville 

Wallins Creek 

Bowling Green 

Shively 

Louisville 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Williamsburg 

Versailles 

Wurtland 



Edward Selliers 
Clarence Caple 
Robert Hourigan 
Wendell Atkins 
Roy Cochran 
Lyman R. Dale 
Jack Turner 
Lawrence Kuhl 
C. A. Noble 
Charles Davis 
Ronald Johnson 
Edward Miracle 
Robert Igo 

Tom Sims 
Charles Hall 
Jack Hall 
Frank P^y 
Bill Welborn 
Charles W. Kuhn 
Virgil Rains 
Wilson Sear.-^ 
David Grim 
Howard Keel 
Walt Green 
Buck Dawson 
Herman Leforcc 
Bruce Howarel 
Pat Dale 
Lawrence Travis 
Preston Holland 



Sherrill Morgan 
Charles Fredricl 
Gayle Bowen 
Dan Walker 
Marvin Burgess 

Milton Graham 
Ollie Howard 
Guy Patterson 
Gerald Poyntei 
Don Netoskie 

Ralph Colby 
Walter Brugh 
Jack Fugate 
Harold Wood 
Rex J. Miller 
N. L. Passmore 
Gene Davis 
William Adams 
Bert Dixon 

James Conlev 
Nick Dann 
Heulyn Bishop 
Baker 



Fred Francis 
John Meihaus 
Daniel H. Hill 
Bill Wilson 
Ron Cain 
George Sauer 
Wililam Ellis 
Richard Green.voll 
Nike Diachenko 
Jim Jenkins 
Jim Williams 
George Bertrain 
Charles Kolasa 
Rodney Walker 

William Straub 
Jim Lindsay 
J. A. Gray 
Frank Petett 
Gordon Perry 
Paul Gering 

Ralph Horning 

Dallas Arnold 

John Stoll 
James L. Howard 
Estill Branham 
Robert A. Cleveland 
Earl Browning 
Donald Daniels 
Gardner Bates 
Perky Bryant 
Archie Powers 
John A. Snowden 
Buddy Fields 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1935 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These inferpretations of the 1965 
National Alliance Football rules do not set aside nor 
modify any rule. They are made and published by 
the National Federation of State High School Athletic 
Associations in response to situations presented. 

1. Play: 3rd and 10 on the 50. Al advances to B's 
IS where ihe ball becomes dead. B3 piles on. 

Ruling: A's ball. Ist and l ri :he 9 yardllne. ^3 
soon as the ball became dead, free of a live ball foul 
on B's 18, a new series has been indicated. Hence it 
was A's ball, 1st and 10. The piling on was a dead 
ball foul carrying a 15-yard penall.y, which in this case, 
is one-half the distance to the goal, or 9 yards. There- 
fore, after the penalty was measured, it is k's ball, 
1st down and 1 on the 9 yardline. (10-4-1; 10-5-1) 

2. Play: 4th and 4 on K's 35. K's punt is caught by 
Rl on R's 25. Rl advances to K's 10 where he is 
laclded. During the advance of Rl, a substitute (RS12) 
leaves the team bench of R and goes onto the field 
of play where he holds K2, a potential tackier, on: (a.) 
the 50 yardline; or Cb) K's 30. 

Ruling: Unsportsmanlike conduct. 15 yard penalty. 
R's ball, 1st and 10 on its 45 yardline. (2-27-6; 10-3-3) 

Comment: The foul by RS12 (member of R's squad) 
is a non-player foul which occurred during a running 
play. As provided by 2-27-6, "the spot of the foul is 
considered to be the previous spot", i.e., K's .35. 
Because R was in possession of the ball at the time 
of the foul, it is a foul by the offense. The basic 
enforcement spot is K's 40 yardline (where the running 
play ended) and the penalty will be measured from 
there, placing the ball on R's 45 yardline for the be- 
ginning of the new series. In some situations, plays 
with factors similar to the above case, may properly 
be interpreted to be an unnfair act. If the referee 
would so judge the situation, he would "enforce any 
penalty he considers equitable ..." as provided by the 
penalty for 9-7-1. 

3. Play: A legal forward pass by Al from the 50 
is intercepted by Bl on B's 20 yardline. Bl advances 
to A's 40 yardline. During the advance, B2 clips on B's 
40 yardline. After the ball is dead, A2 commits a 
personal foul. 

Ruling: Penalty for clip by B2 is automatically 
accepted, making the succeeding spot B's 25 yardline. 
The penalty for the dead ball foul by A2 is enforced 
from the succeeding spot, thereby placing the ball on 
B's 40 yardline where it will be 1st and 10 for B. 
(10-1-2-c) 

Comment: In this situation, penalties result in off- 
setting 15 yard distances, with the ball being put in 
play at the ball being put in play at the spot of the 
enforcement for the live ball foul. When the distance 
is offset, the referee, after giving the signal to stop 
the clock and following it with the dead ball signal, 
will spot the ball and face the goal of the team which 
committed the first (live ball) foul. He will then give 
the appropriate foul signal and point to the goal of the 
offending teami. He should then face the goal of the 
team which committed the dead ball foul, give the 
appropriate foul signal and point to the offendmg 



team's goal. Alter properly giving the signal for each 
foul, the referee should indicate the dead baU signal 
md declare the ball ready-for-play. In those situations 
in which the dead ball foul is by the t(>am which is in 
possession, :he stakes shju'd be -e' before the penalty 
lOr the dead ball foul is administered. 

4. Play: Bl is offside. B2 intercepts a pass and B3 
clips during ihe runbac'i. Al plies Dn after the Ijd.U 
has become dead. 

Ruling: Double loul. The offside by B, wnich is 
prior to the change of possession, toes not permit 
the situation to qualify lor automatic acceptance or 
ieclination. When there is a double foul involved, lie 
replay is mandatory as provided in 10-2-1. Captains 
^re not consulted in the case of a double foul. (10-2-1-a) 

5. Play: Rl catches a scrimmage-kick on his 20 
and advances to the 50. During th9 run by Rl, K2 holds 
on R's 43. R2 piles on after the ball is lead. 

Ruling: Penalty for foul by K2 is automatically 
accepted and places ihe ball on K's 35 yardline. Line- 
to-gain is thereby determined. Penalty for the dead 
ball foul by R2 is then administen'd. iilacing the ball 
back on the 53. Therefore, it will be R's ball, 1st and 
25. (10-2-c). 

6. Play: Bl intercepts a legal forward pass m his 
end zone. He runs parallel to the goal line, after which 
he is tackled with the ball becoming dead in B's 
end zone. During the run B2 clips: (a) in the end 
zone; or (b) on B's 6 yardline. After the ball is dead 
A2 commits a personal foul. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b) the penalty for clipping 
is automatically accepted and results in a safety in 
either case. The penalty for the dead ball foul by A 
is administered on the succeeding kick-off. B wiU free- 
kick from his 35 yardline. (10-1-2-c; 10-5-2) 

7. Play: Bl intercepts a legal forward pass in 
his end zone and advances the ball to B's 25. During 
the run, B2 clips: (a) in his end zone; or (b) on his 6 
yardline. After the ball is dead, A2 commits a personal 
foul. 

Ruling: In (a), the penalty for the clipping by B2 
is automatically accepted and results in a safety. The 
penalty for the foul by A is enforced on the free-kick 
with B kicking from his 35. In (b), the penalty for the 
clipping is automatically accepted and, because of the 
one-half the distance to the goal provision, it placed 
the ball on B's 3 yardline. A's foul is then measured, 
placing the ball on B's 18. It will be B's ball, 1st and 
10. (10-1-2-c) 

Comment: When the penalty enforcement results 
in other than offsetting distances because of the half 
the distance to the goal provision for one penalty and 
a 15-yard measurement for the other, both distances 
should be measured to avoid confusion. For the live 
ball foul, the referee will proceed by signaling the 
clock to stop and then giving the signal for the dead 
ball. From the spot of enforcement of the live ball 
foul, the referee will measure the distance of the 
penalty, give the appropriate foul signal and point to 
'he goal of the offending team. From there (the suc- 
( Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 196? 



OCTOBER, 196.T 



VOLUME XXVIII— NO. 



Certified Football Officials 



Poblished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 46501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOAKD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J, Sanders (1962-66), Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Don Davis 
(1963-67). independence; Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse 
Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville: Oran C. Teater (1964-68), Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

Jt^om the Commissione'i s LJfflce 
Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have 
been established. Each registered official should file 
at once with his nearest bureau head his schedule ot 
games and list of dates on wWch the official will be 
available to call games. The names of the bureau 
heads, with the residence and business phone numbers 
(residence numbers given first), are as follows: 

Re.x Alexander. 1320 Wells Blvd., Murray, 763-3579. 
762-3385 

Charlie Irwin. Route 1, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820. 
TU 6-4820 

Roy Settle, 1618 Sioiux Place, Owensboro. 
MU 3-2136, MU 3-3551 

Jerry Kimmei, Beechmont, GR 6-2656 

Turner Elrod. 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 
VI 2-5110, VI 2-0431 

Howard Gardner. 829 McCollum, Elizabethtown, 
765-6273 

Claude 0. Ricketts, 10005 Third Street Road, Vallev 
Station, 937-8610, 634-1551 

Roy Winchester, Bethlehem, 878-4102, New Castle 
346-8421 

Bob Miller, 197 HoUday Lane, Ft. Thomas, 441-5685 
694-6535 

Jack Wise, 20S Pocahontas, Georgetown, 2052, 120 

Harry Stephenson. 1612 Hawthorne, Le.xington, 299 
1757, 255-2960 

Bob Foster Science Hill, 423-8683. 678-8161 

William E. Nau, Box 209, Barbourville, 6-4112 
6-3057 

Goebel ' Rittei 137 Main Street, Wliitesburg, 633 
7164, 633-2339 

E. B. Ma\- Ji. Box 185, Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 
886-8661 

Ernie Chattin. Y.M.C.A., Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 



Attention, Officials! 

The 1965 Delegate Assembly of the K.H.S.A.A. 
ajiiended By-Law 29-4-c by providing that a certifiea 
official, to continuf^ to receive this rating each year, 
shall have worked in at least si.x first team high 
school football games and /or twelve first team high 
school basketball games during the previous year. 
Since this amendment was adopted after the 1964-65 
seasons in the two sports involved had ended, officials 
working fewer than the number of first team high 
school games required did nDt have the opportunity to 
comply with the new rule. This being true, the new 
rule is an "ex post facto" rule. The recjuirement con- 
cerning the minimum number of first team high school 
games worked are therefore not to be put into effect 
until the 1966-67 schcwl year. Officials currently receiv- 
ing the certified rating should keep the amended rule 
in mind if they wish to qualify for the rating next year 
without having to take an additional examination. 



Bell, Clarence T. 
Bennett, Howard 
Blanton, Homer 
Bond, Jack C. 
Bordy, Philip 
Boyles, Jerry F. 
Brotzge, Maurice 
Brown, George W. 
Brizendine, Vic 
Burton, John 
Caiman, E. C. 
Canter, John 
Craft, Albert B. 
Craft, Bill 
Current, Ray 
Dallmann, James W. 
Davis, Clyde E. 
Davis, W. Curtis 
Durkin, Jack H. 
Elovitz, Carl 
Faust, Jack 
Florence, Robert H. 
Forbes, J. W. "Jack'' 
Fortney. Robert L. 
Grace, Charles K. 
Graham, James 
Greene, Paul "Dutch" 
Gruneisen, Sam J. 
Hadden, Newall 
Ha,gan, Joseph E. 
Hagerman, Bart 
Harris, Gene 
Heinze, Frank 
Heinzc. John G. 
Hellard. George D. 
Holeman, Fletcher 
Huber, Carl W. 
Jenkin>, Kean 
Johnson, Bernard 
Kraesi.g, Charles F. 
Lambert, Irvin 
Lange, William E., Jr., 



Lenahan. Thomas F. 
Lotz, Robert W. 
McCollum, Bob 
McGlasson, Gene 
McLemore, Jack T, 
McNabb, Edgar 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Mayhew, Wm.. M, 
Mayo, Henry L. 
Mercke, Frank R. 
Mordica, William A. 
Mullins, B. E. 
Noland. Doug 
Nord, Ed 
Powell, Logan 
Reddington, Jim 
Reece, Fred "Rock" 
Riggs, Wilham T. 
Sacra, Gresham 
Sapp, Edward 
SchUch, Paul 
Schmitt, K. F. 
Schmitt, Paul E. 
Scott, W. L. "Bill" 
Scale, William E. 
Sellman, John B. 
Shanks, Thomas E. 
Shaw, John H. 
Showalter, John 
Sloan, Wallace 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Stephenson, Harry- 
Stevens, William D. 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Thomas, FrcUik M, 
Thompson, Jack F., 
VanMeter, David G. 
Washer. Stanley 
Watts, Shirley R. 
Wilson, John Pope 
Wise, Billy V. 



Approved 

Adams, Calvin K. 
Atkinson, Charlie 
Beck, C. Norman 
Bivins, George 
Brown. Herman G. 
Bullock, Ted 
Cecil, Morris 
Cullen, Charles "Bud' 
Culp, Willard E. 
DeMuth. Paul E. 
Dent, Donald L. 
Denton, Charles 
Denton, William J. 
Detenber. Gene H. 
Fish, Leland G. 
Fenimore, Clarke E. 
Foster, J. W. 
Fraley, Bill 
Franklin, James A. 
Fryrear, William P. 
Fugate, E. H. 
Fuller, Wilton H. 
Galuk, Walter M. 
Gentry, Dale J. 
Golden, Billy J. 
Grace. E. H., Jr. 
Griffith, Lauren 
Hall, Henry N. 
Hanes, Edward C. 



Jr. 



FootbaU Officials 

Hicks, Lloyd 
Holbrook, Wm. M. 
Hughes, Robert E. 
Hynson, Fred R. 
Kraft, H. Nellis 
Leahy, Pat 
Lindon, Bob 
Lusby, George 
McGehee, Gordon K. 
McNamee, Jack E. 
Mattingly, Charles "\ 
Mercker, George 
Millerhaus, Bill 
Minta. John H. 
Moody, William R. 
Murray, Thomas 
Neal, Gene 
Nord, Gilbert 
Omer, Harold 
Osborne, Ted 
Parker, Bob L. 
Peeno, Harry 
Ray, Bob 
Ree(i, Gordon 
Roof, Jerry C. 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr. 
Russell, Joe 
Schuble, Charles 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Page Three 



Shirley, Michael D., Jr. 
Snyder, Gus 
Staten, Joe 
Sudetto, Dick 
Swinford, John 
Van HoQse, Jack 
Vaughan, Dick 
Wagner, Jim 
Waide, Harry D. 



Walker, Paul R. 
Warren, Kenneth 
Welch, J. D. 
Wilson, Louis 
Wise, Jack 
Womack, William 
Wurtz, Emil 
Zimmer, Thomas 



Fern Creek Wins Cavana Award 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 



Alliso 



1-1173, 



Roy., Route 1, Lovers Lane. Hopkinsville, 

886-4431 
Adkins, Wendell. Box 163, Hyden, 672-2111, 672-2337 
Anderson. Glenn, Jr., 24 Front Street. Prestonsburg, TU 6-2106 
Atkinson. Charlie, No. 50 Queen Ave., Imperial Estates, New- 
town Rd., Lexington, 262-3298, 252-2626 
Bartels, John T., 423 Third, Dayton, 581-4250 
Berger, John D., 26 Myers Lane, Allison Park. Pennsylvania, 

767-4931, 621-3500 ext. 265 
Bostic. L. M., Jr., 419 West 12th St., Bowling Green, 3-3319, 

VI 3-6573 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3712 Lexington Rd., Louisville, 893-7206, 

896-4461 
Bullock, Teddy, 2167 Cypress Drive, Lexington, 277-0145, 252- 

7963 
Bunch, William O.. Box 4158, Ft. Rucker, Alabama 
Burton, John, 633 28th St., Ashland, 324-5964, 324-4111 ext. 

6608 
Cathey, Gene S., 1415 Vine, Murray, 763-5367, 753-3245 
Clark, Charles Louis, 2315 Brighton Dr., Louisville, 459-3540 
Cowan, Robert L., 506E. Master St.. Corbin, 528-2824, 528-6727 
Day, Conrad, 36101/4 Bradon Rd., Huntington, W. Va. 
Detenber, Gene H., 229 Tyne Rd., Louisville, TW 5-705S. 587- 

0936 
Donald, Edward W., 4098 Farragut St., Ft. Knox, 4-6872, 4-7617 
Douglas, Wayne, 209 Wash Ave., Paintsville, 789-9449, 789-3546 
Douthwaite, Donald D., 6616 Merwin Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

661-0915, 662-0891 
Downs. Joseph W., 829 Bartley St., Bardstown, 348-5123 
Drake, Dick, 72 Donnelly Dr., Ft. Thomas. 441-4235 
Flynn, Robert D., 1708 Charleston Court. Lexington, 299-5902, 

266-6188 
Forbes, John W., Jr., 4316 Dannywood Rd., Louisville, 454- 

6025, 778-2731 
Fowler, Jack L., 1911 Mt. Vernon Ave., Pt. Pleasant, W. Va. 
Frakes, Chester L., Jr.. 1816 Lilly Lane, Jeffersonville, Ind., 

BU 3-7254, JU 4-5331 
Gentry, William R., Jr., 101 Oakley Bldg., Bardstown, 348- 

8903. 348-3767 
Grace, Hickory, Middlesboro, 248-1290, 337-3320 
Haffey, Stan, 607 Hilltop Lane, Cincinnati 15, Ohio. 622-8818 
Hamilton, Patrick J., 3316 Radiance Rd., Louisville, 451-9737, 

587-1022 



Johnson, Bernard, 322 Blueberry. Lexington, 277-2883, 252- 

2200 ext. 2677 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, GL 8- 

1293, JU 5-3281 
Kasperski, Harry W., 652 South Floyd St., Apt. 38, Louisville, 

583-0359, 582-5215 
Kaufman, Alvin R., 8215 St. Anthony Church Rd., Louisville, 

366-0126, 587-0871 
Kimball. Philip C, 7017 Old Heady Rd., Jeffersontown, 267-6357 
Lally, James, 1210 Ross Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-3644, 421- 

5700 ext. 653 
Lewis, Horace, 4399 — 16th St. Rd., Huntington, W. Va. 
McCowan, Connell, Route No. 1, Box 251, Corbin, 528-4932 
McLane, Albert I., Route No. 1, Glendale, 862-4579, Cecilia, 

Ky., 862-1924 
Mullins, Joseph F., Wurtland Ave., Wurtland, 836-4091, 324- 

1155 ext. 367 
Nevil, Vernon E., 7748-C 70th Tank Bn. Rd., Ft. Knox. 4-6604 




The announcement has just been made that the 
Fern Creek High School was the winner of the M. J. 
Cavana Swimming Award for the school year 1964-65. 
Fern Creek's point score was 48. Covington Catholic 
was in second place with 45, and Villa Madonna was 
third with 43.4. 

The Cavana Award is given annually to the .school 
the student body members of which show the greatest 
proficiency in swimming. The point scoring is based 
on the number of pupils who can swim 45 feet in deep 
water, the number who can swim correctly any three 
of five listed strokes, and the number of pupils who 
hold life saving certificates. Percentages of the stu- 
dent bodies which can perform in these categories are 
involved in the point system. 

The presentation of the award was made earher 
this month by K.H.S.A.A. President Foster J. Sanders 
during a Fern Creek assembly program. 



Orem, Dale Linton, 38 Arctic Springs, Jeffersonville. Ind., 

BU 3-8226, 682-1161 
Porco. Kenneth J., 3924 Layside Drive, Louisville, 459-3455, 

458-3281 
Rawls. L. Townes, 1146 Kees Rd., Apt. No. 2, Lexington. 254- 

8627, 262-7963 
Robinson, J. Ward, 3802 Nanz Ave., Apt. 7, Louisville. 895- 

0631, 895-0631 
Rudolph, Fred. Jr., 560O Jeanine Drive, Louisville, ME 5-7441, 

969-3013 
Sacra, Gresham, 605 Anniston Dr., Lexington, 262-6036, 299- 

1221 ext. 2244 
Schmidt, Edward, 3888 Woodsong, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522-7397, 

HA 1-5200 
Seale, Frank E., 1001 Tates Creek Rd., Lexington 
Smith, James Howard, 5512 Winchester Ave.. Sciotoville. Ohio, 

776-2116, 353-6719 
Smith, Richard E.. 1 Lake View Dr.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Smith, Robert E.. 240 Clover Lane, Louisville, 893-6330, 635- 

7406 
Spath, William Joseph, 4019 Rosemont Ave., Louisville. 452- 

9637, 684-6209 
Spencer, H. Edward, 2107 Inwood Drive. Huntington, W. Va. 
Staley, E. G., 1117 Inca Trail, Georgetown, 1091. 100 
Taylor, Dennis H., 1406 Hughes, Murray, 763-4825, 763-5512 
Thrasher, P. H., 1105 Westwood Lane, New Albany, Ind., 

WH 4-3434, WH 4-2216 
Waff, Jack H.. Route No. 2— Box 108. Bardstown, 348-9339 
Ward, James Morris, Brockton, Box 601, Richmond 
Wigginton, A. M., Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, 776-7881 
Womack, William H., 517 Cherry, Henderson, VA 6-4526, 

VA 6-3781 
Woods. Lanier, 629 South Broadway, Georgetown. 707, 70 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



The Flying Dutchman 

It is September of 1965 and a crew of painters 
from one of the largest decoration companies in the 
South is being directed by a handsome fellow who 
uses crutches to help him move around. This physi- 
callj-handicapped supervisor of Kirchdorfer and How- 
ell. Inc., had to compete to win this paint contract, 
and he continually competes with leg paralysis, 
caused by polio at the age of three — but Bobby Kirch- 
dorfer keeps right on fighting and winning. 

The month is September, the year is 1949, and a 
group of youngsters have gathered at Mill Creek 
School for a track meet which, strangely enough, is 
to be the start of the Game Guy Program of the 
K. H. S. A. A. A kid on crutches, paralyzed from the 
waist down, insists on running in a wheelbarrow 
race. The other boys called him Bobby. He ran, he 
won and he showed other physically handicapped 
youngsters that sports are for them also. 1949 is a 
flashback to Bob Kirchdorfer, the youngster; 1965 
shows you successful Bob Kirchdorfer, the man. 

For Christian sendee in the K. H. S. A. A. sports 
program work with that kid who wants to fight a 
handicap and put him in the "Parade of Game Guys" 
where young men and women learn to compete with 
out asking favors in sports and go on to compete sue 
cessfully in the "Game of Life." Write the Dutchman. 
Bo.x 36, Jeffersontown, telling him about your Game 
Guy — Here's the way it is done: 

As soon as you send the story of the physicall> 
handicapped boy or girl you are working with to the 
Dutchman, that youngster is immediately a winnei 
and he is sent a Lionheart Trophy to indicate his 
courage to all who see it. Lionhearted kids become 
nominees for the Game Gu.v Award of the year. In 
April when the coaches, principals and sports officials 
gather for the annual K. H. S. A. A. banquet in Lou- 
isville the Game Guy of the Year is always the guest 
of honor. 

The "Parade of Game Guys" is unending and the 
inspiration they provide all of us is amazing. One 
educator made this comment, "I used to complain a- 
bout the handicap.s life put in my way until these- 
phxsically handicapped Game Guys taught me to keep 
m\ mouth shut." 

Let's take a look at the Game Guy's test — THE 
TEST OF A MAN IS THE FIGHT HE MAKES; THE 
GRIT THAT HE DAILY SHOWS; THE WAY HE 
STANDS ON HIS FEET AND TAKES FATE'S NUM- 
EROUS BUMPS AND BLOWS. A COWARD CAN 
SMILE WHEN THERE IS NAUGHT TO FEAR, WHEN 
NOTHING HIS PROGRESS BARS; BUT IT TAKES 
A MAN TO STAND UP AND CHEER WHEN SOME 
OTHER FELLOW STARS. 

IT'S THE KNOCKS THAT YOU TAKE AND THE 
JOLTS YOU GET, THE SHOCK THAT YOUR COUR 
AGE STANDS; THE HOUR OF SORROW AND RE- 
GRET, THE PRIZE THAT ESCAPED YOUR HANDS 
—THESE TEST YOUR METTLE AND PROVE YOUR 
WORTH. IT ISN'T THE BLOW THAT YOU DEAL, 
BUT THE BLOWS YOU TAKE ON THIS GOOD OLD 
EARTH, THAT SHOW IF YOUR STUFF IS REAL. 

From Bowling Green comes word from Paul 
Walker that the park citj- is comtemplating building a 
two-hundred acre park with an eighteen hole goU 
course. Here's a tip for Bowling Green and other Ken- 
tucky cities and counties. If you want to buy ground 
for a park, the Federal Government will pay 50 per 
cent of the cost; if you want to build a golf course. 




BOB KIRCHDORFER 



swimming pool or other sports facility in a park you 
are going to build or already have, you can get 50 
per cent of that cost from Washington. If you are 
interested, write to Arthur A. Davis, Deputy Assistant 
Commissioner for Open Space Land, Housing and 
Home Finance Agency, Washington, D. C, and get 
money from this $310,000,000 grant for your Kentucky 
community. Tell Arthur that The Flying Dutchman 
told you to contact him. Arthur has one of those Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor Awards which go to people doing 
things unselfishly for others. 

It's Lexington's John Gettler who is the Corn Cob 
Pipe winner for the month of September. Popular 
Johnnie has given so much of his time and effort to 
the boys and girls on the playgrounds of the bluegrass 
city that a swarm of Kentuckians wrote the Dutchman 
saying, "Make a pipe smoker out of Johnnie." One of 
the nation's outstanding young men in the field of 
parks and recreation, John is also a fine sports official. 

Incidentally, Conrad Ott, who used to direct the 
Youth Ambassador of Friendship flights to foreign 
countries for the Dutchman, is now Superintendent of 
Schools in Lexington. There's no educator better than 
Conrad and so Lexington scores again. 

The Dutchman completes his twenty-fourth con- 
secutive series of basketball clinics for the K. H. S.- 
A. A. in October. Each year is more convincing that 
these Kentucky coaches and sports officials are "men 
among men." 

At Ashland, Ernie Chattin charcoaled a two-inch 
steak in his back yard and Helen had one of her 
widely acclaimed apple pies ready; Bill Clark did 
what he does annually, namely catering a stag steak 
banquet for his coaching staff featuring your columnist 
as the main eater; at Hazard there was another 
dinner waiting on top of the mountain at La CitadeUe, 
with the famous Willie Dawahare as host; and Jerrj 
Kimmel had country ham waiting at Beaver Dam. 
A guy could take on poundage doing K. H. S. A. A. 
clinic work. 

All of us connected with the K. H. S. A. A. program 
are interested in boys — so here are some closing 
thoughts famous men have had about boys: 

Arnold H. Glasgow: Impatience and not inex- 
perience is the greatest handicap of youth. 

Cicero: "If the younger generation doesn't know 
where it is going, it must be following in its father's 
footsteps. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Paige Five 



Registered Basketball Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A.— 1965-66 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abell, James A. 175 Charlotte Ann Dr.. Paducah, 444-5323, 442- 

5484 
Abell, Richard M., Central Hall, W.K.S.C., Bowling Green, 745- 

2561, 745-2791 
Abney, David W., 7206 Lorenzo Lane, Louisville, 239-7175 
Adair, Lewis C, 5307 Lost Trail, Louisville, 361-2775 
Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville 
Adams, William M., Letcher, 633-7787, 633-2524 
Adkins, Wendell L.. Bo.x 163, Hyden, 672-2111, 672-2337 
Akridge, Dean, Fredonia, 545-3398, 545-3332 
Alexander, Darryl, Irvingrton, 547-2641, 422-2101 
Alexander, Howard S.,Lebanon Rd., Crittenden, 823-5621, 824- 

4489 
Alexander, Bex, 1320 Wells Blvd., Murray, PL 3-3579, 762-3585 
Allen, Doug, Armory Drive, Jackson 666-5010 
Allen. J. Mack, Route No. 3. Box 418, Ashland, 325-1918, 324- 

7131 
Allen. James D., Hunter, 285-3442, 285-9130 
Allen, Nelson R., 507 Bellefonte-Princess Rd., Ashland, 836- 

8915, 836-6596 
.'illey, Joe, Route No. 2, Prichard. W. Va. 
Anders, Raleigh A., Route No. 5, Box 73A, London 864-2552, 

864-5103 
Anderson, Don, Box 41, Chattaroy. W. Va. 
Anderson, George, Waywest, Manchester 598-2778 (Bus.) 
Arbuckle, Kenneth E., 126 Wickliffe, Greenville, 338-4514, 525- 

3413 
Arflin, Tracy T., Lot 24, Terrell's Trailer Court, Oak Grove, 

439-4475, Ft. Campbell 798-3191 
Asher, Tony, General Delivery, Clay, 664-2438 
Ausmus, William H., 2305 Cumberland Ave., Middlesboro, 248- 

2176 
Bailey, Frank, 462-B 8th Ave., Fort Knox, 4-3479, 4-5855 
Baird, William, Box 842, Hazard, 6-5443, 6-5443 
Baker, Billy B., 395 Sagasser, Somerset, 679-3072 679-1121 
Baker, Robert M., Jr., 324 Springhill, Danville 236-2092, 236- 

6371 
Balcom, Otis, 199 W. Main, Wilmore, 
Ball, John C, Blaine, 652-3812, 349-3044 
Ballaban, Thomas, 1103 Archland Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 322- 

3024, 761-7600 
Balser, James L., 431 Pach Orchard, Pikeville, GE 7-4619, 

GE 7-7323 
Bankemper, Thomas, 317 East 7th St., Newport, 581-5047 
Barker, Walter D,. P. O. Box 1411, Friendship, Ohio, 858-1967, 

353-5690 
Bates, Bob, 2732 Sunrise, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 4-2168 
Bates. Garner, Jr., 418 Kentucky Ave., Whitesburg, 633-7174, 

633-2339 
Beasley. Donald, Dunnville, 787-7455 (Bus.) 

Begley, Jack, 1502 Florence, Middletown. Ohio 423-4279, 425-3681 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 South 41st St., Louisville, 778-7792, 582- 

5569 
Bennett, Bob, 123 Winding Way, Frankfort, 223-0446 
Bennett, Gene, Route No. 2, Wheelersburg, Ohio, PR 6-2655, 

GL 6-4191 
Bennett, Jerry Pat, Route No. 2, Box 323, Minford. Ohio, 

779-2942, 456-4161 
Bentley, James, Shelby Gap 
Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., 3502 Behymer Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

762-3932, 752-0555 
Berger, John D., 26 Myers Lane, Allison Park, Pa., 767-4931, 

621-3500 ext. 265 
Bero, James J., Box 968, Williamson, W. Va. 
Berry, William, 1633 Jackson St., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-6765 
Bingham. Bennie, 430 Etna St., Russell 
Bisig, George Carl, 1658 Maywick, Lexington, 278-2134 
Bisig, Roland A.,2419 Broadmeade Rd., Louisville, 454-3797, 

Bivens. Donald C. 532 Elder. Calvert City. 395-4402 

Bivins, George W., 3105 Talisman Rd., Louisville, 459-5111, 

895-0621 
Blackburn, Tennyson R., Box 2167, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blackburn, Viley O., 210 College, Somerset, 678-8986, 678-8171 
Blankenship, Zeb, 334 College Manor, Harrodsburg, 734-2464, 

734-4195 
Blanton, Bob R., Ivy Hill, Harlan, 573-1869, 573-4333 
Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville. 297-J336, 265-2164 
Blevins, Robert L.. 410 Wolford St., Pikeville, 7-6845, 7-7338 
Bocook, Earl, 1102 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Boehm Robert Ted, 2011 Redleaf Dr., Louisville, 425-3714, 459- 

3610 
Bowling, Roy, Fields Lane, London, 864-5006, 844-4181 
Boyd, Jerry, 204 Valley Rd., Danville 236-2241 236-6373 
Bradley, Marvin L., Box No. 65, Mt. Olivet 
Bradley, Merlin, Linefork 
Bradshaw, Bill, Box 195, Burgin, 748-5265, 748-5180 



Brandshaw. Frank C, 6900 Springdale Drive, Evansville, Ind., 

424-8438, 6-6211 ext. 219 
Brashear, Loy Ray, Route No. 1, Glendale, 854-2921. 765-6402 
Brawner. Robert A.. 282 Longview Dr., Bowling Green, S43- 

6648 
Breeden, Charles W., Box 212, Mt. Washington, 638-4897. 543- 

2494 
Brewer, Randell, P. O. Box 73, London, 864-5608, 864-2107 
Brill, John William, Route No. 1, William.stown, 823-5041 
Briscoe. Hubert, Route No. 3, Shelbyville. 633-4669, 633-2543 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louisville, 454-6843, 689- 

9111 
Broaddus, William D., 922 Western Ave., Apt. No. 9, Coving- 
ton, 261-1412 
Brock, John H., 611 Virginia Ave., Pineville, 337-2463 
Brookbank, Donald, Box 61, Higginsport, Ohio, 375-4264 
Brown. Billy C, 411 Center St., Berea. 986-3921 (Bus.) 
Brown, E. C, Fair St.. Liberty, 787-7275, 787-7191 
Brown. J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 236-3474, Lex- 
ington 262-7252 
Browning, Earl E., 8715 Blossom Lane, Louisville, 426-2937, 

425-2641 
Bruce. Larry Garmon, 1309 Rose Hill Dr., Owensboro, 683-6357, 

684-1175 
Bi-ummett, Joseph W., P. O. Box 175, Danville. 236-2158 (Bus.) 
Buchanan, William R., 103 Short St., Mt. Sterling, 1322, 1150 
Buis, Nathaniel, Liberty. 787-6714. 787-6151 
Bunn, Harold, 2623 Collis Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Burchett. Carroll I., 403 Broadway. Paintsville, 266-272S 
Burchett, Lanier. Box 237, Stanford, 366-2581. 365-2126 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, 

TU 6-2385 
Burkett, Garvis Gene. Box 65-A. Nancy, S71-308G, 678-4942 
Burkhart, James G., Loyall, 573-1437 
Butcher, Douglas. Meally, 789-5553 
Butcher. Granville. Williamsport, 789-4006 (Bus.) 
Butler, Jack K., 2604— 4th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Butner, Billy M., Route No. 2, Box 616, Lancaster, 792-3503, 

792-3603 
Byars, Michael Kirk, 2209 Coburn Blvd.. Lexington, 266-3347, 

254-9895 
Cain, Ron, 3038 Wedgewood Way, Louisville, 159-2442, 451-4330 
Caldwell, James A., 162 Grover Ridge. Ft. Thomas, 441-1626, 

397-2487 
Calitri, Donald Lynn, Box 481, Union College. Barbourville, 

546-4151 ext. 133 (Bus.) 
Callahan, Tom J., 532 Lowell Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 861-6989, 

721-4787 
Callighan, Robert Wells. P. O. Box <)18, College Station, 

Murray. 753-4662 
Campbell, George H., Jr., IKi Winchester Ave., Middlesboro, 

248-5882, 248-5643 
Campbell. James W., P O. Box 273, Elkton. 265-5275, 265-2363 
Campbell, Keller Bond, 630 South Gay Place, Lexington. 254- 

1347, 252-2200 ext. 8120 
Canady. Jacy Glenn, Ekron, -;28-3898, 877-3537 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Bhd., Louisville, 451-8218, .■587-8862 
Cantrell. Hubert E., Campton. 668-3036. 668-3531 
Caple, Harold E.. 608 Church St., Ludlow. 261-5384 
Carlberg, John H.. 227 Main, Muldraugh, 042-2723 
Carnes. Dick, 110 Plenty, New Richmond, Ohio, 742-4172. 742- 

7701 
Carney. Robert L.. 4566 Alder, Louisville, 969-0762 
Carr. Billy W., Longview Drive, Franklin. 586-6356 
Carter, Dauton O., Jr.. CMR, Box 12757. Wright - Patterson 

AFB, Ohio, Covington 261-3994 
Cartwright, James ■•Joe", Olive Hill 
Caruso, Dick, 1150 Wellsprnig Dr., Mt. Healthy. Ohio, 521- 

3349, 421-3300 
Cash. Randall E.. 5107 Robbs Lane. Louisville, 969-6453, 367- 

1721 
Cassity, Gordon, Route No. 2, Box 136K, Cattlettsburg. 739-6200 
Castle, Jack T., Route No. 2. Pikeville, GE 7-4367. SK 4-8184 
Castle, Quentin, Route No. 23, Paintsville. 297-3027, 789-5301 
Chandler, Melvin P., 5th St., Corbin, 528-6382, 528-3902 
Chattin. Ernie, 615— 17th St., Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 
Chinn, Mike, Rockport, Indiana. MI 9-2861. 684-8811 
Cieslack. Albert. Box 218. Richland Indiana, EL 9-4960, EL 9- 

4950 
Cisco, Robert N., 4016 Vine Grove Rd., Ft. Knox, 4-4273. 4-3212 
Clardy, Barry D., Route No. 2, Greenville, 338-3610, 338-3036 
Clark. Charles Louis. 2315 Brighton Dr.. Louisville, 459-3540 
Clark, Larry W.. AF 15696438, 6910th, Security Wing, Box 

621. APO New York, N. Y. 
Clark, Tom, 430 Spalding Ave., Lebanon, 692-2034 
Clater. James F., Route No. 4, Bowling Green. 842-9863, 842- 

0341 ext. 296 
Clevenger. Charles E., 720 Lakeview Ave.. New Boston. Ohio, 

456-5430, 456-4559 
Click, Bobby Joe, Manton, BU 6-3067, 285-3014 
Click, Danny, 2148 Winterberry. Lexington, 266-3136 (Bus.) 
Click, Edgle, Martin. BU 5-3067 

Click. Ezra F.. 323 North Maple. Somerset, 678-8688 
Clusky, Joe, Box 296, Red Jacket, W. Va. 

Cochran. Roy H., Jr.. 713 Caldwell, Corbin, 528-6373,, 864-4340 
Cole, Dickie, P. O. Box 265, Sweeden, 697-3191 
Coleman, C. Ronald. 6978 Taylor Mill, Independence, 356-2002, 

431-4360 ext. 43 
Coleman, Charles R., 1551.'. West Bell Court, Lexington, 254-2703 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Coleman. Daniel Lee, No. 3 East 41st St.. Covington, 261-2388, 

431-3207 
Coleman, James E., Phelps, 456-3591 (Bus.,1 
Collev. Lvnn, 411 East 23rd, Hopkinsville, 885-9538 
Collins. Hubert. Wittensville, 297-3152, 789-3731 
Collins. Jack. 6 Gino Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-0154, Ft. 

Campbell 4404 
Combs. F. D., 978 Highland Ave., Jackson, 666-5465, 666-2446 
Combs. John, Route 1, Box 44. Hazard 
Combs. Keith A., 4519 Covert Ave., Evansville. Ind., 477-2869, 

476-3051 
Combs. Wilmer Eugene. Route No. 2, Box 239, Hazard, 251- 

2460. 436-5441 
Condra. Kenneth P., Pineville, 337-6134 
Conlev, Connie B., 62 Main St., Paintsville. 789-3207 
Conlev. George. 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, 324-6042 
Conlev. Lester. 943 West McKelvey, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522-8824 
Conley. Ted L., 4725 Nottingham Court, Ashland, 326-3232, 

324-6343 
Conn, Jerry L.. Farmers 

Conn. John D., 4300 Retreat Rd., Louisville, 964-1769 
Conrad, Ralph L., Route No. 1. Falmouth, 664-3854 
Cooksev, Marvin, 2905 Orville. Louisville, 969-3685 
Cooper, John F., 512 East 3rd St.. Augusta, PL 6-4608 
Cooper. Warren, 120 Barbour Court, Morehead. 784-4295, 784- 

4153 
Coplev, Sidney M., Box 352. Delbarton, W. Va. 
Cornelison. Walter L., Bybee. 369-5631, 369-6350 
Cornett. John M., 2109 Winterberry Drive, Lexington, 278- 

1678, 252-8166 
Correll, Elmer Eugene. 72 Horseshoe Drive. Paris, 987-4699. 

987-2560 
Cowles, Harold M., Route No. 1, Bowling Green, 842-2061 
Cox, Alva J., 705 Bryan. Evansville, Indiana. 425-8793, 422-4161 
Cox, Colin. Bluegrass, Hazard, 436-3945 

Craft. Bill, 140 Vanderbilt Dr., Lexington, 277-4843, 277-3737 
Crager, Bobby F., South Lake Drive. Prestonsburg, 886-2252 

Bus.) 
Grain. Donald J., Route No. 2, Warsaw, Ohio, 327-2364, 327-2351 
Cravens. Robert L., 2707 South 6th St., Louisville, 637-2361, 

368-5813 
Creech, Robert Lee, Rogers. 668-3300, 668-3461 
Croft, Lewis E., 206 Wayne Dr., Hopkinsville, 886-7610. Pa- 

ducah, 442-5479 
Crook, Bill R., Route No. 2. Box 175. Corbin, 628-6277 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr.. 8139 Elbow Lane North, St. Peters- 
burg, Fla., 344-7661. 898-2141 
Gulp, Ronald D., 317 Walnut. Bellevue, 261-7834, 541-6520 
Gulp. Willard E., 318 Skyline Parkway, Hopkinsville, 886-7967, 

439-5032 
Cummins, Albert, P. O. Box 366, Cynthiana, 234-3860, 234-4260 
Cummins. Ray E., Campton, 668-3015 668-3015 
Gundiff, John. Box 283, Greenville, 338-1748, 338-1748 
Cunningham, Jack D.. Majestic 

Cunningham. Julian R., Route No. 2, Mt. Sterling, 1055J3 
Gurley, Tom, 1408 Larchmont. Louisville, 637-3095, 447-3221 
Curnutte, James R., 201 East Eighth Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Curry, Ronald, P. O. Box 422. Virgie 
Curtis, Douglas E., 4962 Cobb Drive, Dayton, Ohio. 256-4530, 

253-7111 ext. 56207 
Dame, L. J., 2925 McAlister Place, Owensboro. 684-5681, 683- 

2491 ext. 238 
Daniel, Roger T.. 917 12th St., Paintsville, 789-4421, Prestons- 
burg 886-2311 
Daniels. Bob, 709 Wesleyan Park Dr., Owensboro, 684-9393, 

683-4796 
Dann, Nick. Morehead, 784-5646. 784-4153 
Daugherty. Elwood, Box 111, Irvine, 464-8103 
Daum, Charles A., 215 Christ Rd.. Evansville, Indiana. 424- 

0217, 425-4309 
Davenport, Bowman, Box 62. Clarkson, 242-3061 (Bus.) 
Davis, A. J., 646 East Main. Hazard, 436-4440. 436-3333 
Davis. Charles, 2379 Clovercrest, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521-5724, 

431-5632 
Davis, Harold T., Box 191, Beaver Dam, 274-4159, 274-3870 
Davis, Ralph C, 1326 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-8606, 

532-8143 
Davis, Ralph E., 1007 Front. Vanceburg, 796-4501, 796-2521 
Davis, William. Lovely 

Dawson. Alby, Box 78, Millersburg, 484-2219 
Day, Bill E., 1128 Hopi Trail. Frankfort, 227-7534, 227-9661 

ext. 263 
Day, Conrad, 36101/-. R. Bradon Rd.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Day, Jack L., 605 Morhead St.. Central City, 764-4700, 754-2272 
DeArmond. Norman Allen, Dunmor, 755-8510 

Decker, Dennis Lee. U. S. Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Illinois 
DeGroote, Jamec A., 2905 E. Mulberry, Evansville, Indiana, 

476-6497. 424-6481 ext. 214 
Del Conte, Art, 573 Enright Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 471-6440, 

751-1230 
Dement, Jerry D., 217 N. Seminrav. Madisonville, 821-3332 
Denham. Ronald, P. O. Box 251, Stanford, 365-7385. 366-2166 
Dennedy. Robert, 5083 Orangelawn Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio. 921- 

3905, 662-2200 
Denney, Murrell C, Eubank, 379-4440 (Bus.) 
Dennison, James E., 1825 James David Ct., Owensboro, MU 4- 

3602, 4-7256 
Denton, Charles. 127 South Hubbard Lane, Henderson. VA 8- 

4020 



KAPOS NEWS 



IMPORTANT NOTICE! 

PRINCIPALS and COACHES please notify your 
cheerleader sponsor and ciieerleading squad of the one 
day cheerleader clinic to be held at Bowling Green 
High School on Saturday, October 16, 1965. You will 
receive or may have already received a detailed bro- 
chure telling of this clinic. 

This is the FIRST "Teaching-Learning" Clinic to 
be held by K.A.P.O.S. in the western part of the state. 
For many years the clinics have been held in the 
central part of the state, and since this has worked a 
transportation hardship on those squads living beyond 
the 100 mile radius of Lexington, the K.A.P.O.S. board 
members voted to move the 1965 clinic to Bowling 
Green Kentucky. 
NEED GOOD ATTENDANCE! 

The founders of K.A.P.O.S. have every reason to 
be proud of their accomplishments these past eleven 
years. Some of which are: 

Providing professional guidance to interested ad- 
ministrators and sponsors in setting up acceptable 
standards and well planned cheerleader programs, 

Lending dignity and importance to cheerleaders 
through the awarding of trophies to outstanding groups 
at the state basketball tournament, 

Sharing ideas and information through the media of 
a Newsletter, 

Encouraging good sportsmanship by having the 
Governor of Kentucky proclaim Sportsmanship Week, 

Awarding a $500 Educational Scholarship to a de- 
serving and needy cheerleader. 

The above projects have to be financed. By sending 
your cheerleader squad to this important Teacher- 
Learning Clinic you will be contributing to the con- 
tinuance of the above worthwhile projects. 

COST of the CLINIC . .. $2.00; Sponsors accom- 
panying cheerleaders will be admitted free. 

DATE of the CLINIC . . . Saturday, October 16, 
19S5; Gymnasium — Bowling Green High School. 

LEADER: Mr. Tommy Taylor . . . Former Uni- 
versity of Texas cheerleader. He has trained over 2500 
cheerleaders. 

PRINCIPALS! 

We urge you to back your sponsor. They serve 
your school in such needed capacities as chaperones, 
guides, disciplinarians, counselors, program sellers, 
etc. The $2.00 dues which your school pays to belong 
to KAPOS come back to you many fold. URGE your 
sponsor to attend the clinic and finance and support 
her/him. 

Make check payable to K.A.P.O.S. and send your 
1965-66 $2.00 dues to: Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, College of 
Education, U. of Ky., Lexington, Kentucky. 

Derrickson. Richard, 621 Cardinal Lane, Lexington, 277-4557, 

277-9991 
Devary, Bill, 2929 Brigadoon, Lexington, 277-7237, 252-2250 

ext. 2481 
Dial, Charles R., 3300 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dickson, Tom, 1134 Hogan. Portsmouth. Ohio, 353-4488, 456-5547 
Dierolf, Lt. Col. William H.. Jr.. Dir. of Services Bldg. T 742, 

Ft. Belvoir, Va.. 2-3269, 3-0145 
Dieterle, Owen, Box 136, Millersburg, 848-2076, Lexington. 

252-0640 
Dills. Bernie, 6606 Hialea Court, Cincinnati. Ohio, 231-4027, 

421-5700 ext. 691 
Disken, Jim. 2930 Vine St.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 281-0136, 281-92S4 
Distler, Marvin, 8036 Sheed Bd.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 621-3110 
Divine, Wayne L., 400 West 4th St., Central City, 764-2783, 

754-2272 
Dixon, Billy M.. 512 Brockton, Richmond 

Dobson, Kenneth. Route No. 3. Paducah. 442-0778. 443-4534 
Doctor. Lt. R. P.. Qtrs. "'G" Naval Ord. Plant. Louisville, 

368-0717. 361-2641 ext. S19 
Dodson. Winston, 213 Greenbriar Rd., Lexington, 277-2598, 

262-2250 
Doolin. Thomas Eugene, 716 Cheek Ave., Ashland, 324-7742 
Dorsey, James. 1110 Gilsey Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio, 471-8050 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Page Seven 



Dotson, John B., 504 McKinney Rd., Vincennes Indiana, 882- 

8095, 882-8096 
Douthwaite, Donald D., 6616 Merwin Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

661-0915, 662-0891 
Downey, Jim, 1944 Monroe Street, Paducah, 443-7568, 442-4474 
Drake, Dick, 72 Donnelly Dr., Ft. Thomas, 441-4235 
Driskell, Earl, Jr., 918 Stone St.. Louisville, 634-3591, 366-0396 
Driver. Bob, Route No. 4, Glasgow, 427-2537 
Duerson, William R., Route No. 3, Paint Lick, 925-2367, 792- 

2459 
Duff, Earl, 218 Lyttle Blvd.. Hazard, 436-2725, 436-3136 
Dunaway, Adrian, 246 Cumberlnad Ave., Barbourville, 646-4601, 

646-4049 
Duncil. Charles, Slemp, 675-4274 
Duncan. Robert Ray, 1008 Earl St., Henderson, 826-8239, 827- 

3645 
Durden, John B., 302 E. Parkview Dr., Hopkinsville, 886-7186 
Durbin, Hade, Jr., 219 N. Mantle, Elizabethtown, 766-7893, 765- 

Duvall, James W., Central Hall, W.K.S.C, Bowling Green 
Duvall. Thomas Jay, Sr., 4123 Craig Ave., Louisville, 368-1064, 

637-1421 ext. 236 
Dyer, Joe R., Route No. 2, Kirksey, 489-3322 
Eades, Jimmie, South Carrollton, 754-2689 
Eastridge, Bobby Arlin, 806 North Columbia Ave., Camp- 

bellsville, 466-6942. 465-6381 
Edelen, Ben R., Jr., 2842 Klondike Lane, Louisville, 454-3518, 

452-2641 
Edwards, Don A., 119 East Main, Sebree, 835-7537, Murray, 

Ky. 753-3300 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College St., Elizabethtown, 765-4007 

765-6118 
Elliott. Humplirey T, Liberty, 787-6665 
Ellington, James E., 3621 Cherry Tree Lane, Erlanger, 341- 

8107, 581-7946 
Ellis, Johnny, Box 331. Prestonsburgg. 6-2761, 6-3080 
Elrod, Turner, 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 2-6110, 745-3544 
Emery. George A.. 234 Clay St., New Albany, Indiana, WH 4- 

5257, 634-1511 ext. 60 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 337-2916 
Ernst, Edward R., Box 244, Erlanger, 689-7181 
Evans, Wade, Tyner, 364-2517 

Everett. Billy N.. Route No. 2, Pembroke, 886-4749, 277-6281 
Everett, D. J., Ill, 709 Belmont, Hoppkinsville, 6-9748 
Parish, Merlin J., 1665 Longmeadow Drive, New Albany, In- 
diana, WH 5-8773, Brandenburg Ky., 422-2811 
Farmer. Billie, 203 South 16th St., Mayfield, 247-1941 (Bus.) 
Feher, Al, 600 Main St., Lynch, 848-2717, 848-5431 
Feix, Al, Box 620, Route No. 1, Henderson, 826-3331, 826-9056 
Fenton. Don J., 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 271, 

3792, 761-4344 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 922 Lee St., Barboursville, W. Va. 
Ferrell, Doc, 159 Edgemoor. Lexington, 264-0301, 277-4273 
Ferrell, Lewis Jimmy, 236 Kelly Drive, Glasgow, 651-8460. 

661-3661 
Finley. Albert R.. Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, 886-4108, 885-8335 
Fish, Leland G., 826 Oak Hill, Lexington, 265-7166, 254-7077 
Flowers, Randal B., Cecilia, 826-4276. 766-6177 
Floyd Richard, Route No. 1, Bagdad, 747-8751, 747-8751 
Flynn, Alton. P. O. Box 85, Richmond, 623-6150, 623-6150 
Flynn, Reynolds P., 1151 Hamilton Rd., Park Hills, 581-9837, 

331-5080 
Flynn, Robert D., 1708 Charleston Court, Lexington, 299-5902, 

255-5188 
Foster, Berryman E.. 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 265-7783 
Foster, Bob, Science Hill, 423-8683, 678-8161 
Foster, Joseph W.. 176 Market St., Apt. 13, Lexington, 254- 

3670, 255-6666 
Fox, David, Route No. 1, Box 86-A, Beattyville. 464-8636, 464- 

8536 
Frakes, Chester L., Jr., 1816 Lilly Lane, Jeffersonville, Ind., 

BU 3-7254, JU 4-6331 
Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, VA 7-3232 
Francis, Fred Louis, Route No. 1, Box 21-A, Bardstown, 348- 

3196, 348-3980 
Francis, William Gordon, 77 Mary Jane Lane, Prestonsburg, 

886-2108, 886-8661 
Francis, William Lewis, 7505 Bard. Rd.. Fern Creek, 239-9772, 

538-4211 
Frazier, Glenn O., Price, FR 7-2406 
Frazier, Roy D., Price 
Fredericks, Rex, Route No. 2, Box 193, London, 864-2765, 864- 

2888 
Freese, Oliver T., 5618 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, 561-5398, 

361-7010 
Freppon, Thomas E.. 42 Grandview, Ft. Thomas, 781-0583, 

421-1800 
Frey, William E., 224 East 10th, Newport, 291-2268 
Fritz, Robert G., 1716 Parkview, Hopkinsville, 885-3948 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Dr., Richmond. 623-4956, 623- 

3424 
Fugate, E. Hugh, 329 Mockingbird Dr., Frankfort, 223-1340, 

227-9661 ext. 335 
Fuller. John R.. Jr., 4835 Epperson Rd., Paducah, 898-3115, 

443-5626 
Fultz, Jack, Box 636, Olive Hill, 286-2303, 286-2481 
Furgerson, William W., 703 South 16th, Murray, 753-1336, 762- 



Galyen, Douglas, College Court, Apt. 311, Murray 762-4437 



Gentile, Robert M., 3103 Roselawn Blvd., Louisville, 468-7340, 

636- 3557 
Gentry. Bobby Gene, 3420 Candy Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-6219, 

886-2515 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 266-4801, 262- 

5494 
Gibbs, Harold M., 3507 Fountain Drive, Louisville 
Gibson, Carl, Mousie, 946-3198 
Gilbert, Gerald L., Box 51, Tunnel Hill Rd., Elizabethtown, 

765-6704, Ft. Knox 4-7719 
Gilbert, Lawrence, 113 Cardinal Court, Glasgow, 678-6433, 

651-8801 
Gilbert, William Curtis, 702 Otter Creek Rd., Vine Grove, 

877-5316 
Gill, Joe, 455 Marimon Ave., Harrodsburg, 734-2729, 734-4195 
Oilman, Ronald R., 632 16th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Giordano, Al, 107 Ratliff, Princeton, 365-5680, 365-6615 
Glazer, Marvin Gerson. Ill Throne Heights, Eminence, 845- 

6134 
Goins, Edgar S., Route No. 1, Box 130, Drakesboro, GR 6-2225 
Golden. Billy Joe, 668 East Main, Lynch, 848-3512 
Goldey, William H., 463 Crestview, Henderson, 827-3622, 826- 

3931 
Goley, Jim. Cayton Rd., Florence. 283-2009, 431-8335 
Gooch. Lloyd E., Box 221, Stanford, 365-7259, 365-2124 
Goodall. Walter J., 820 Park Ave.. Newport, 291-9470, 261-3313 
Goode, Earl A.. Valley Road. Elizabethtown, 765-4451. 765-6401 
Gordon, Billy K., Route No. 2, Waddy, 829-5137, 829-6120 
Gordon, Levi J.. 108 Eminence Terrace, Eminence, 722-8891 

(Bus.) 
Gorence, John P., 3608 Charlane Parkway, Jeffersontown, 

267-6232, 267-7728 
Gorrell, Howard, Box 33, Auburn, 542-4181, 642-6312 
Gossett. Jack, 609 Hagan Court, Ashland, 324-2294, 324-5138 
Gour, Bob. 218 South Lee St., Bowling Green, 843-9582 
Gover, David B., Bronston, 561-4673, 678-4721 
Grace, Hickory, Middlesboro, 248-1290, 337-3320 
Graves, Preston H., Marrowbone. 864-3604 
Griffin, Dennis B., Route No. 2, Box 132A, Butler, 472-6331, 

472-6901 
Griffis. Estil, Jr., Route No. 7. Lexington, 266-1932, 266-1932 
Grigsby, Pete, Jr., McDowell, 377-2356, 377-6202 
Gustafson, Al. 248 Francis Bid.. Louisville, 464-6151, 587-8102 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington. 255- 

5332, 252-7866 
Hagan, Joe. 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, 468-1325 
Hagen, William R., 2595 Highgrove Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, 522- 

0647, 662-6293 
Halbert, Hubert, 1004 Central Ave., Pikeville, GE 7-7231, GE 

7-4044 
Hall, Dave. White Hall, Univ. of Louisville, Louisville 
Hall. Elvis, McHenry 
Hall, Kenneth, P. O. Box 445, Muldraugh, Ft. Knox, Ky. 4-2623 

(Bus.) 
Hall. Mac. Route No. 1, Box 187. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hall, William W., Bonanza, TU 6-2878 
Ham. Gerald. 1616 Oliver, Bowling Green, 842-5396 
Hamblin, Athony, Buckhorn, 398-7486 
Hamilton, Walter F., 3404 Bryan Way, Louisville. 469-5432, 

JU 7-1121 ext. 411 
Hamm, Harold D., Route No, 6. Frankfort. 227-9800 
Hamm. L. E., Route No. 3, Mayfield. 623-4947, 247-5670 
Hammock Don L., 1612 Audubon Parkway, Louisville, 635- 

7111, 586-4149 
Hammons, Norman, Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, 885-5914. 886- 

3311 
Hampton, Ray, 113 W. Glenwood, Clarksville, Tenn.. 886- 

6919 (Bus.) 
Hardin, Carl Ray, Kennedy Lane, Lebanon. 692-2784. 692-3100 
Hardin, Don G.. Box 88. Morehead, 784-7376 
Hardin, Jack H, 1105 "B" Street, Ceredo. W. Va. 
Hardin. William R.. Box 171, Inez, 298-3568. 298-3585 
Harmon, Glenn, 232 Madison. Danville 236-6748. 236-4343 
Harned. Vic, 216 W. Walnut. Leitchfield, 269-4196 (Bus.) 
Harp. Kenneth R.. 3522 Brookview Dr.. Lexington. 277-8743 
Harper, Bruce D.. Route No. 6, Lexington, 266-0249 
Hai-per. Rob-e, Jr., Beechmont 
Harper. Tom C, 1611 Hazel, Washington, Indiana, 254-3860 

(Bus.) 
Harris, Billy, Cleaton, 764-4410, 754-1630 
Harris, Larry Russell, Route No. 4. Nancy, 871-3221 
Harrison, John L., Route No. 6. Cynthiana. 234-3333. 234-5721 
Hatfield. Cecil E., Box 2676. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hatfield. Dennis. 1610 May St., (3ovington. 431-4234 
Hatf-'eld. James P., 942V. Dayton Ave., Lexington, 254-9517, 

262-6008 
Hatler. Donald W., 269 Spring St., Madisonville, 821-2380 

(Bus.) 
Hayden, Samuel J.. Fancy Farm, 623-8414. 623-8414 
Haynes. John. 416 Clay, Henderson, VA 7-5137 
Hazelwood. Howard P., 213 Liverpool Rd., Lexington, 254-3385, 

262-3930 
Hedge. Davd W.. 321 Mocking Bird Dr., Jeffersonville, Ind., 

BU 2-2242 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Heitlinger. Lester. 3647 Johnston Way, Louisville, 459-3699, 

895-3401 ext. 288 
Heitzman. Warren E.. 7291 Memory Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio 

521-7530. 243-2015 
Heldman, Dr. John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, 363-2181, 

637-2531 
Henderson, Austin, 243 W. Bobbins, Covington, 291-6714, 431- 

0900 
Henderson, Hugh, 3014 Colonial Hill Rd., Louisville, 458-7116, 

969-3111 
Hendon, Charles, Route No. 1, Mayfield. 328-4458 
Hendon, L. J., 228 South 15th St., Murray, 753-3658, 753-2825 
Hendricks, Dudley, 403 Sycamore, Carrollton, 732-5694 
Henley, Jimmy L.. Box 122, Columbus, 677-2867, 677-2941 
Hennegan. J. E. Michael, 823 East Maple, Jeffersonville, In- 
diana, 'BU 2-5079, BU 2-1351 
Henson, Tony C, Route No. 6, May£eild, 658-3126, 443-1155 
Hertzberger, Robert H., 1310 Terrace, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

4-1681, HA 5-6211 ext. 214 
Hewitt, R. T., 813 Sharpe St., Murray. 753-5435, 762-4391 
Hicks. Floyd E., 43 New URI, Florence, 283-1207, 731-2121 

ext. 250 
Higginbotham, William, Jr., Box 174. M.S.C., Morehead, 784- 

Hill, Earl F.. London, 864-2521, 864-2128 
Hill, Ernest L., 314 High St., Hazard, 436-2141 (Bus.) 
Hills. Marshall L., Box 433, Morning View, 356-9687 (Bus.) 
Hines, Douglas, 310 Vaught. Somerset. 678-5907 678-4721 
Hinton, Henry E., 1210 Witawanga, Lyndon. 435-7627 
Hisle. Charlie R., 21 Locust Drive, Winchester, 744-5754, Lex- 
ington 299-1221 ext. 4217 
Hitt, Billy D., Route No. 2, Mayslick. 763-2608, 664-5327 
Hobbs, Fred L. 601 Warwick Dr., Owensboro, 683-8209 683- 

2401 ext. 627 
Hobbs, William Paul. 226 North LaRue Rd., Henderson, 827- 

3798 
Hofstetter, Joe. Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
Holeman, Bill R., 103 Locust St., Manchester, 698-2999 
Holland, David W., P. O. Box 43, Water Valley, 355-2640, 77 
Holt. Glenn, Jamestown, 343-2495, 343-7611 

Holt Robert E., 2817 Faircourt. Hopkinsville. 885-3405, 886-1207 
Holthouser, Ora L., 614 W. So. Heights, Louisville, 366-4724, 

778-2731 ext. 445 
Hopkins, B. L.. Box 109, Park City, 749-4444, 749-9000 
Horn, Everett, Jr., Inez, 298-3423. 298-3605 
Horton, John Len, Rural Route No. 2, Owensboro, 683-5234 
Howard. Bruce L.. Keeton Heights, West Liberty 
Howard Henry D., 316 Fourth, Pineville, 337-3989. 337-2329 
Howard, Jimmy D.. 1932 Madison Paducah, 443-1333, 442-1649 
Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr., 319 So. Main, Eminence, 845-7111, 845- 

4071 
Huber, Jerry. 404 Scott, Covington, 681-0897, 431-6723 
Hudson, Oscar, Box 32, Sassafras 436-3858, 436-2141 
Hudnall, William, 313 Creekview Dr., Paris. 987-1641, 987-4700 
Huff. Cordell, 106 Herndon. Berea, 986-4596, 986-4621 
Huggins James F.. 361 Sumpter Ave., Bowling Green, 842-5619, 

842-5303 
Hughes. Paul P.. 620 Riverside Dr., Prestonsburg, 886-6771, 

886-2170 
Huiet. Fred, 7241 Longfield, Madeira. Ohio, 661-9239, 561-9903 
Hunley, Neil P., 672 Main St., West Liberty. 743-4311, 743-4269 
Hurley. Robert. Box 244, Williamson. W. Va. 
Hurt, Thomas C, 220 Crab Orchard, Lancaster. 792-2312 
Huter. Jim. 3643 Vermont. Louisville, SP 6-0707, 368-6519 
Hutchinson. Jack T., Martin, 285-3552. 285-3011 
Hyatt. Bob, 2309 Hikes Lane, Louisville. 451-0091. 587-8611 
Hyland, F. D.. P. O. Box 465, South Webster, Ohio, 778-2401, 

466-4161 ext.. 417 
Hynson, Fred R., 2056 St. Christopher, Lexington, 266-4286, 

264-9895 
Idol. Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Bd., Middlesboro, 248-2837 
Ingraham Gary J., 9706 Lanesboro Way. Louisville, 895-4532, 

897-2816 
Inman, Briscoe, Boone Trail, Danville, 236-5740. 236-5211 
Irwin. Don, 210 Sherwood Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-7627 885- 

Irwin. Charlie. Route No. 1, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 
Jacoby, Ben W., 127 Showalter Dr., Georgetown, 2342 
Jahnigen. Robert E., 6676 Plantation, Cincinnati, Ohio 521-2424 
James, Carl Edwin. 204 Nob Hill Lane, Apt. No. 8, Louisville, 

937-3726, 582-2571 
James, Gene. 1507 South 3rd .St.. Ironton. JE 2-6976. JE 2-6224 
Jamiel, Joseph C. 121 Trevor St., Covington, 581-8579 
Jenkins. Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, 765-4887, 765- 

4606 
Jennings, Michael, 734yi Winchester Ave., Ashland, 325-7535, 

324-2111 
Jent. Richard, 209 Legion Drive, Franklin, 586-4188, Lexing- 
ton 252-2200 
Johns, Jerry, Box 308, Somerset, 678-5610, 678-4721 
Johnson, Gene B.. 103 Bedding, Glasgow, 651-2587, 678-6031 
Johnson, Gordon M.. Second Street, Meeks Apt. No. 1 Paints- 

ville 789-3722 (Bus.) 
Johnson. W. Bernard. Boute No. 7, Box 286, Hopkinsville, 

269-2208. 886-6151 
Johnson, Harry B.. 3024 Stanford, Lexington, 277-2889 
.lohnson, Harvey K., SJiepherdsville, 543-7693, 643-2494 
Johnson, Jack D., Box 275, Burgin, 748-6773, 748-5170 



Johnson, Jerry Lee, 313 Kentucky Ave., Georgetown, 1453, 

Lexington, 252-2250 ext. 2204 
Johnson, Walter, Boute No. 2, Box 203, Grayson, 474-6908, 

474-5721 
Joiner, Bussell D., Smithland, 928-5663, 928-4731 
Jones, Boyer. 437 Jackson, Campbellsville, 465-5953, 465-8880 
Jones, Carson G., 713 N. Main St., Evansville, Ind.. 422-3069, 

4-7741 ext 360 
Jones. Joe S.. 203 Green St., Manchester, 598-3793, 698-2129 
Jones, John Howard, Boute No. 6, Scottsville, 237-3959 
Jones, Paul, 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown, 765 - 4502, Ft. 

Knox, 4-7019 
Jude, Harold D., Metewan, W. Va. 

Junker, Edwin G., 1045 W. Seymour. Cincinnati, Ohio, 821-4117 
Keatley, James H., Boute No. 2, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Kelly Charles B., 4206 Greenwell Lane, Louisville, 447-2665, 

684-1341 
Kelly, Robert J., Jr.. 2818 Ontario St., Flatwoods, 836-3786, 

Ironton. Ohio, JE 2-4326 
Kessler, Robert H., 6208 Fegenbush Lane, Louisville, 239-3884, 

EM 6-9511 
Kidwell, James S., 1112 Parkway, Covington, 581-9141 
Kimmel^ Jerry. Beechmont, 476-2656 

King, James A., 5000 Clarmar Rd., Route No. 3, Jefferson- 
town. 239-8015, 776-2466 
King, P. J., 307 Coast Guard, Owensboro, 3-3169, 3-2401 
King, Raymond H., 216 Blossom Lane, Southgate, 441-6309, 

261-4357 
Kinney. Dale, 203 Webster, Cynthiana, 234-2228 
Kirkpatrick, Chralie V., Tomkinsville. 487-6392, 487-6117 
Kloufetos, Spiro J., 2702 Pioneer Rd., Louisville, 447-0373, 

582-5610 
Knight, Bill, 762 N. 36th St.. Paducah, 443-2775, 443-2775 
Kopp. John L., 9602 Plumwood Bd., Fern Creek, 239-7561, 582- 

4575 
Kretzer. Burdette C, Jr., Van Lear, 789-6009 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Road, London 864-6236, 864-2181 
Ladd Ronald E., Dixie Heights, Princeton, 6-6342. 5-5651 
Lally. James, 1210 Boss Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-3644, 421- 

5200 ext. 663 
Lambert. Irvin G.. 6110 Bural Way, Louisville, 969-4718 
Large. Wendell Gordon, 8616 Monterey Rd., Louisville, 869-7477 
Larsen, George, 7850-A Estrada, Ft. Knox. 4-3484, 4-3730 
Laugherty, Kenneth R., 422 Pyke Rd.. Lexington, 252-2970, 

252-7676 
Lawrence, Alvin L., Route No. 2, Box 546, Walton, 486-4570, 

632-2489 
Lawson, Rondell, Garrett, 358-3531 

Layman. Allison, P.. 3060 Seventh Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Leahy. Pat, 1819 Ratcliffe, Louisville, 776-6368, JU 7-1121 

ext. 472 
Lee. Eobert L., 6810 Dartmoor Drive, Louisville, 426-3863, 895- 

2431 
Lee, Thomas J.. 650 E. Main St., Hazard, 436-6874. 436-3148 
Lemaster, Douglas 392 Glen Ave. West Liberty 743-4344 
Lewis, James R.. 6 Clover Ave., Erlanger, 341-2285 
Lewis. Maxwell L., Box 262, Kenova, W. Va. 
Liebert, Donald J.. 771 Harrison Ave., Apt. No. 3, Louisville. 

635-7900, 634-4771 
Lile. Clyde F., 511 Henderson Dr.. Hopkinsville, 885-3715, 886- 

7776 
Lillie. William Westley, 3018 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville, 451- 

0562 582-2658 
Lindsey,' Jack, 130 Baughman, Danville. 236-7052 (Bus.) 
List. Frank A., Boute No. 3, Owensboro, 683-6569, 684-6285 
Lloyd, Birt Leonard, 3610 Rear Brandon, Huntington, W. Va. 
Lloyd. David. 616 Elm, Ludlow, 681-1119 
Logan. Donald E.. Falmouth, 654-3583, 664-3583 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde, Louisville. 895-8731, 582-2613 
Longo, Dick Locust Drive, Charlestown. Indiana 
Louden, Hubert C. Box 122. Prospect. 228-1669. 584-4141 
Loudy, Kenneth. Slemo, 676-4278, 675-4278 

Lowe, Gene T.. Route No. 6, Box 28. London, 864-5724, 864-2207 
Lowe. James D., 119 Valleybrook Rd. Bowing Green, 842-3734, 

842-6516 
Lucas, Gene T., 100 Lemons Mill Bd.. Georgetown, 1371, 19 
Lusby, George, 615 Pueblo Trail. Georgetown. 2312, 70 
Lytle. William Price, Wades Men Store, Hopkinsville. 886- 

6667, 886-7411 
McAnelly, David. F.. Liberty, 787-6525, 787-6571 
McAllister, Jack. 2705 McKinley. Cincinnati, Ohio, 662-5288, 

241-3980 
McCargo, Frank, 1713 East 9th St., Hopkinsville. 886-1984, 

886-9400 
McCarter, Sgt. Bobby. Co. D, L.B.P., 17th Inf., APO 09079, 

New York City, N. Y. 
McConnell. Michael Joseph, 115 South 39th St., Louisville, 

776-9721. 684-2231 
McCowan, Connell. Boute No. 1, Box 261, Corbin, 528-4932 
McCoy. Hayse, Box 265, Inez, 298-3417, 298-3417 
McDannold, Lewis H., 340 Bidgewood Dr., Versailles. 3-3571, 

266-1161 
McDonald, Carroll W., 316 East 13th St. Bowlnig Green, 842- 

4118 
McGehee, Gordon, 733 Forest Lane. Covington, 261-6880 
McGIasson, Galen, 212 North Bend Bd., Hebron, 689-7330, 689- 

7342 
McGlone, Maurice B., 506 Dickerson, Falmouth, 654-8322. 654- 

3316 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Page Nine 



McKenzie, Robert L., 1809 Chestnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
McLane. Albert I., Route No. 1, Glendlae, 862-4579, Cecilia, 

Ky., 862-1924 
McLean, Gordon, Cody, 642-3326 

McLeod. Robert N., Myrtle Wood, Somerset, 678-6536, 678-8766 
McMillin. Larry L., P. O. Box 178, Crestwood, 241-4731, 241- 

4458 
McNamee, Jack, 3616 Muddy Creek, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-5207 
McNeely, Albert T., 501 Leslie Ave.. Glasgow, 465-6179, 465-8168 
McPike, Ray S., Jr., D.C., 407 Theatre Bldg., 629 So. 4th St., 

Louisville. 451-3832, 685-2832 
McShefferty, Sgt. James E., 4865-A Rose Terrace, Ft. Knox, 

942-2226, 942-6932 
Maines, Geroge E., 632 Millvale Dr., Lexington, 278-1984, 255- 

7691 
Madden, McElroy. 463 Lindberg Dr., Lexington, 265-6604 
Madon, Robert Lee, 215 Tennessee Ave., Pineville, 7-2135, 

7-3043 
Mahan. Carle E., Hampton Manor, Winchester, 744-4550, Lex- 
ington, 252-0290 
Mahanes, Tom, 441 Parkway Dr., Lexxington, 254-1802, 277- 

2748 
Maj, Lt. Col. Edward S., 1103 Lanny Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

621-6027, 731-2341 ext. 296 
Marshall, Tivis, 901 French Broad St., Ashland, 324-0015, 324- 

1156 ext.. 374 
Martin, Bruce, Route No. 1. Mt. Sterling, 2360, 2464 
Martin, Carl Thomas, 106 Clover Court, Stanford 
Martin, Charlie, Main Street, Sharpsburg, 247-2141, 247-2611 
Martin. Sam, Jr., McDowell, 377-2453 
Martin, Wilfred R., Cynthiana St., Williamstown, 824-7532, 

824-3326 
Mashburn, Mendel Laine, 2518 Hermitage Way, Louisville, 

425-3847. 425-3847 
Mattingly, Bernard, Cloverport, 788-6674 
Mauney, Bill, 100 Ohio St., Somerset 

Maxwell. James E. 8 Smith Ave. Warsaw, 567-6761, 667-6151 
May, Charles E., Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 886-8661 
May, E. B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg 886-3414, 886-8661 
Maynard, Andrew J., Box 123. Matewan, W. Va. 
Maynrad, Dr. Joe E., 809 Nesbitt Dr., Madison 
Maynard, Kenneth, Box 612, Pikeville. 432-1364 
Maynard, John W., Box 334, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Meade. Foster, 126 Grand Ave. Irvine, 723-2586, 723-3360 
Melmjge. James, Jr., Box 2177, Williamson, W. Va. 
Melton, Robert E., 1406 Young St., Henderson, VA 7-3067, 

VA 7-1838 
Meredith, Denny E., Jr., 2644 Oregon Ave., Louisville, 776- 

2865, JU 4-0221 
Meredith. Thomas Carter, 3608 Chickasaw, Owensboro MU 3- 

3910, MU 4-7221 
Messerian, Nishan, 175 East 3rd Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Metcalf. Earl L.. 3441 Lovelaceville Rd., Paducah, 444-5222 
Metzger. Don, 9312 Cloverwood Rd., Louisville, 454-7511 ext. 

4624 (Bus.) 
Meyer, Bud, 6319 Lilibet Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-3459, 

421-3010 
Mickey, Elbert W., Box 2471, Williamson. W. Va. 
Middleton, Johnny, 209 Leimaur Dr., Richmond, 623-1682 
Mielcarek, Chester N., 844 Delia Dr., Lexington, 277-1534, 266- 

3135 
Milbern, Daniel L., 1049 Patricia Lane, Lexington, 256-5438, 

252-2250 ext. 2603 
Miles, Robert J., 1113 West Mill Rd., Evansville, Ind., 423- 

7419, 423-7419 
Milts, Marvin, 842 N. Adams. Henderson, VA 7-1788 
Miller, Claude O., 704V. Tenth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller, Ferrel, Route No. 1. Murray. 435-6271, 435-5271 
Miller, James C, 1225— 12th St., Tell City, Indiana. KI 7- 

4690. KI 7-2311 
Miller, Rex J., 2711 Greenway Rd., Ashland, 324-6023, 826-4706 
Miller, Roy J., 644 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Ind. BU 3-6335, 

366-2641 ext. 428 
Miller, Victor Leon. 26 Pine Hill Dr., Highland Heights, 781- 

0619, 431-9047 
Moffett, Wilbur, Jr.. 229 Henton Court, Versailles. 873-3296, 

873-3296 
Monahan, Ed, 6629 Plantation Way, Cincinnati, Ohio, 621- 

6582, 681-8300 
Montgomery, Chester, 1808 East 19th St., Bowling Green, 842- 

3214 
Montgomery, Don, First St., Burgin, 748-5682, 748-5180 
Montgomery, Gordon D., 802 East Drive, Danville, 236-7288 
Montgomery, Joe, Mt. Olivet, Carlisle, Ky. 250 
Mooneyhan, James H.. 810 Henry St., Franklin, 586-4989, 686- 

4461 
Morse, Richard K., 163 Deepwood, Radcliff, 351-3748, Ft. Knox 

4-4454 
Moore. James H., Route No. 2, Box 92A, Hardinsburg, 788-3978 
Moore, I!x>bert, 441 Forest, Erlanger, 341-6837, 431-2174 
Moore, Roy. P. O. Box 28, London, 864-6023, 864-5944 
Morgan, Earl, 3600 Kings Highway, Louisville. 451-0171 
Morris, Danny, 216 Wilson St.. Greenville. 338-3807, 338-3807 
Moser, Rudy Clay, Route No. 2, Sebree. 639-5317 
Mount, Gary, 1838 Marietta Dr., Lexington, 299-8130 
Mulligan, J. T., 427 Center, Erlanger, 341-6628, 341-5628 
Munk, McKee, Henryville. Indiana, 796-6662 
Munn, Raymond 0., Maloneton, YE 2-4110 



Murrell, Allen L., 1804 Woodhurst, Bowling Green, 824-1286, 

Franklin 586-4731 
Nau, Bill, Box 290, Barbourville, 546-4112, 546-3057 
Neal. Gene, 3648 SR 132, Route No. 1. Batevia, Ohio, 763- 

5908, 242-5161 
Neal, James, 2546 Fairview Dr., Owensboro. MU 4-3094, MU 3- 

2401 ext. 512 
Neikirk, D. Paul, P. O. Box 602, Somerset, 679-2103 678-5712 
Neunder, W. Gary, 2000 Norris Place. Bellarmine College, 

Louisville, 458-9457 
Nevil, Vernon E., 7748-C 70th Tk. Bn. Rd., Ft. Knox, 4-6604 
Newton, C. M., 2041 Dellwood Drive, Lexington, 277-0494, 256- 

2960 ext. 281 
Nickell, Carl Duane. 2009 Broad St., Paducah, 444-6096 
Nixon, James W.. 2713 Canton, Hopkinsville, 886-2641, Ft. 

Campbell 798-4897 
Noel, John, 2004 Harrison, Cincinnati, 661-8613, 231-6685 
Norris, Kibby S. Welches Creek. 
Norwood. Donald V., Routt No. 6, Strawberry Lane, Franklin, 

586-5119, 686-4636 
Norwood, Thomas R., 811 Henry St., Franklin, 586-3614, 586- 

3541 
Oldham, John H., Box 254E. Prospect, 228-1698 
Omer, Harold G., 150 No. Crestmoor, Louisville, 896-4170, 774- 

6605 
Osborne Larry Joe, Scott Ave.. Pikeville, GE 7-6649 
Osborne, Virgil F., Jonancy, 639-2740 

Overton, Frank, Jr., Box 36, Four Mile, 337-2026, 337-2436 
Owens, Bruce E., Box 917, Harlan, 573-1686, 573-1661 
Owens, R. L., Seventeenth St., Corbin, 628-4426, 528-2330 
Pace, Donald, 2023 Deauville, Lexington, 252-6535 255-0398 
Pack, Donald, Fleming, 866-7708. 865-2861 
Pack, James, Route No. 1, Box 75, Cattlettsburg, 739-6250 
Park, J. M., P. O. Box 299. Paducah, 898-2785 
Parker, Francis V.. East Main St., Providence 
Parrish. Dale, Kentucky Christian College, Grayson, 474-5422 

(Bus.) 
Parrott. Lanny L., 202 Bibb St., Campbellsville, 465-8741, 465- 

8741 
Paulin, Al, 538 Franklin, Tell City, Indiana, KL 7-3323, KL 

7-3323 
Payne, Gayle, Bethlehem, 878-5980 

Pearson, Ozias, 482 Lima Drive Lexington. 256-8190 
Peay, Curtis E., Route No. 5, Bowling Green, 843-3616, 843-8171 
Peck, Harold, 619 W. Delaware, Evansville, Ind., HA 2-0142. 

HA 5-7244 
Peecher, W. Lloyd, 6928 Woodland, Sciotoville, Ohio, 776-9075, 

776-9076 
Peeno, Harry, 30 Butler, Ludlow, JU 1-7335 
Pelfrey, Charles E., 2004 Dalton St., Ashland, 324-1240 
Pelky, Stanley G., 215 Watt, JeffersonvilUe, Ind., BU 2-7791 

Bus.) 
Pelprey, Jack, Box 54. Paintsville 

Pemberton, Ray S., 500 VanVoast Ave., Bellevue, 681-9845 
Pence, Charles E., Route No. 3. Box 211. Grayson, 474-5653, 

474-5653 
Pence, William Jerry, Summit, 862-4617 

Penix, Hobart Fenell, Carter Hall, Apt. No. 2, Morehead 
Pennell, Donald, Route No. 2, Box 28, Jenkins, 832-2665 
Penner, Merritt D., Jr., Route No. 4, Box 739, Manchester, 

598-3711 
Penrod, Joe B.. 1203 Locust, Owensboro, 683-8773, 684-1176 
Pepper, Jerry L.. Route No. 1. Oak Grove, 439-3048 
Pergram. Bernard, 3315 Pine Haven, Ashland. 324-7664, 324- 

1166 ext. 371 
Perkins. James Ernest, Route No. 6. Glasgow. 678-6655 
Perry, James E., Route No. 6, Paducah. 444-6764, 444-6886 
Phelps, Ralph, P. O. Box 84, Ashland, 324-1155 ext. 258 (Bus.) 
Pieratt, Hollie E., Jr., 306 Chipppewa Trail, Frankfort, 223- 

6798, 227-9661 ext. 524 
Pietrowski, Paul, 108 Bishop. Corbin. 528-6391 
Pike, Robert U.S. 42, Carrollton, 732-4309, 732-4233 
Ping, Denton Perry, Route No. 3, Box 78, Somerset, 423-8117. 

679-1574 
Plate, Arthur C, 1126 Franklin, Cincinnati, Ohio, 242-5396- 

241-4114 
Poffenbarger, George, 615 E. Main St., Lexington, 255-2228, 

256-2226 
Points, Charles, 414 Swan Circle, Elsmere, 341-9740, 341-7850 
Polston. Billy Dale, Columbia St., Burkesville, 864-2712, 864- 

3791 
Poppas, Nicholas, 1996 Republican Drive, Dayton, Ohio, 277- 

8704 
Porter, Clarence, 3955 Grace St., New Boston, Ohio, GL 6-5015, 

GL 6-4637 
Powell, Billy R., 4th Street. Box 604. Elkhorn City, SK 4-8702 
Powell, Logan, 107 N. Broadway Park, Lexington, 262-7676 

(Bus.) 
Prater, Rondel R., Hueysville, 358-4185 
Prather, Wilbur E., 1512 Berry Blvd., Louisvillle, 363-2908, 

685-5807 
Preece, John C. Box 365. Kermit, W. Va. 
Prewitt, Shelby, Route No. 1. Box 21, Rockholds, 528-6436 
Price, James E., Liberty. 787-7296 
Prichard. Glenn, Warfield, 393-3200, 393-3250 
Profitt, Lawrence K., Route No. 6. Winchester. 744-3400 
Rader, Douglas, General Delivery, McKee, 287-2447 
Rainey, Jimmy. Hampton Manor. Winchester, 744-4028 
Rakel, Bob, 2626 Topeka, Cincinnati, Ohio, 826-8135, 531-7625 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Ramey. Hubert Dean, Farmers, 784-4724, 784-4604 

Rasso, Steve, 4443 Pinecroft Dr., Cincinnati. Ohio, 481-1488. 

921-3744 
Rawlings, Harold, 1382 Wingard, Radcliff, 351-3249, Ft. Knox 

4-3620 
Ray. Frank. Route No. 4, Richmond, 623-4230, 623-1B31 
Redman. Malvern G.. Route No. 3, Mt. Vernon, 783-2561, 838- 

4439 
Reed, Andrew J., Elsie 

Reed. Charles B.. 102 Elizabeth, Versailles, 873-4213, 873-4221 
Reed, Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 441-4946. 

541-4507 
Rees. Gayle H.. 1613 Atlanta Drive, Lexington. 277-7316, Ix>u- 

isville 361-2641 ext. 310 
Reinhardt, Myron Stanley, Box 403B2, Route No. 2. Alex- 
andria. 635-5724, 694-4545 
Reliford, Paul Glenn, 2912 Prichard, Ashland. 352-2109 
Renfro, John E., 445 Florence Ave., Williamsburg. 6488. 6808 
Rexroat, Jerry Lawrence, 7424 Jamaica. Louisville, 921-9411. 

447-3221 
Reule, Ronald, Box 56. Germantown, 728-2861, 728-2686 
Rhodes, Cecil. Barbourville. 6-4777. 6-4777 
Rice, William L.. 3011 Jefferson Ave., Evansville, Ind., 477- 

3676. 426-4309 
Rice, William, Jr., 1201 Ivy. Hickman, 236-2954 
Rich. Dennis Wayne. Crittenden Rd.. Box 5. Verona 485-7233 
Richards. Dallas R., Parkland Heights, Greenville, Indiana. 

WA 3-5614, WH 4-8471 
Riggins. Jason M.. Box 2591. Williamson, W. Va. 
Riggs, Floyd L., Route No. 8. Box 400. Evansville, Ind.. 867- 

3090. 425-3346 
Rison. Johnny B., 197 3rd Street. Ravenna. 723-2852 
Rister. Edgar L., Garrett 

Ritter, Goebel, 137 Main St., Whitesburg. 633-7164, 633-2961 
Roberta, Donald. Bob-A-Link-Lane, Harrodsburg. 734-4765. 

734-3673 
Robertson, William R., 121 Main St., Springfield, 336-9977, 

336-7154 
Robinson. Don L.. 19061/. Walnut St.. Kenova. W. Va. 
Rodgers, Tom H., 721 Park Court, Madisonville, 821-7312 
Roeckers. Bernie, 803 Loda Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 752-1140. 

831-5100 
Roeckers. Walter. 5114 Imwalle. St. Bernard, Ohio. 242-2676 
Roesel. Joseph. 236 East 8th St. Newport. 681-1086, 621-1300 
Rogers, Howard D., 17 Maryland, Winchester, 744-1785. L,ex- 

ington, 299-1221 ext. 2231 
Roller. Otis C 808 Chambery Dr., Louisvillt, 896-6356. 587- 

1121 ext. 219 
Eolph. Harold J., 915 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-4036, 

532-3231 
Romer, Dick, Box 158. Mt. Pulaski, 111. 
Rose. Bernard, Lothair, 436-4800 
Rossman. Robert L., 2000 Norris Place, Bellarmine College, 

Kennedy Hall, Rm. Ill, Louisville, 468-9414 
Roy. Charles D.. 400 Lexington Rd.. Evansville. Ind.. 422- 

5429. 426-5662 
Rubarts. Leland G.. Dunnville, 787-7500. 787-7562 
Rush. Rex E.. Route No. 1. Tomkinsville. 487-6964 
Russell. Allen. 1503 Sycamore, Murray, 753-2832 
Russell. Eugene. 1106 Gallia St.. Portsmouth, Ohio, 353-7653, 

353-2103 
Russell. Joe, Brookhaven Drive. Russellville, 726-6983, 726- 

6983 
Russman, Godfrey F., 1041 Goss Ave.. Louisville, 969-2175. 

635-7426 
St. Clair. Robert L.. Jr.. 5703 Norton Ave., Louisville, 969- 

1023, 366-0326 
Sagers, Robert M., 494 Morrvue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 921-0724. 

251-4610 
Sallee. Alan L.. 1737 Deer Park, Louisville, GL 1-6478 (Bus.) 
Salyer, Henry E., 4829 Bluebird Ave.. Louisville. 969-6371, 

778-2731 
Salyer, James H., Salyersville. 349-4292 
Salyer, Jesse. Flat Gap, 265-2892, 266-2164 

Saylor, Lanny R.. Box 191, Wallins Creek. 664-3918, 664-3444 
Sams. Glenn, Rector Ave., Auburn, 542-8761 

(Continued In November Issue) 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
ceeding spot), he will promptly measure the penalty 
for the dead ball foul in the opposite direction after 
which he will spot the ball, give the appropriate signal 
and point to the goal of the offending team. Then, af- 
ter indicating the dead ball signal, he wiU declare 
the ball ready-for-play. 

8. Play: 3rd and 10 on A's 45. During the advance, 
Al fumbles. Bl recovers and returns the ball to A's 
20 yardline. During the run by Bl, B2 clips on A's 
30. While the ball is still alive, A2 commits a foul 
by grasping the face protector of Bl. 

Ruling: Double foul. A's ball, 3rd and 10 on A's 
45. This situation does not qualify for automatic de- 



cision because even though there was a change of 
possession and a live ball foul after the change of 
possession, the opponents (in this case A) did not com- 
mit a dead ball foul. The grasping of the face protector 
was a live ball foul. Situations do not qualify for auto- 
matic acceptance or declination unless there is: (a) 
a foul before or after a touchdown; (b) a foul during 
or after a try-for-point; or (c) a foul during a live 
ball, after change of team posession, which is followed 
by a foul by the opponents after the ball has become 
dead. (10-2-1-a) 

9. Play: Al advances beyond the line to B's 30, 
where he throws a backward pass which is caught by 
A2 on B's 35. A2 advances for a touchdown. 

Ruling: The first run ended on B's 30. The first 
running play ended where A2 secured possession, i.e., 
B's 35. "The second run ended at B's goal line where 
the ball became dead. If a foul occurred during the 
first running play, the basic enforcement spot is where 
the first run ended. If the foul occurred during the 
second running play, the basic enforcement spot is 
where the second run ended, i.e., B's goal line. (10-3-3) 

10. Play. Following a fair catch at the left inbounds 
line, R snaps from the center of his 20 yardline. K is 
offside and the penalty is: (a) accepted; or (b) 
dechned. 

Ruling: In (a), R may snap from any place be- 
tween the inboundns line on his 25 yardline. In (b), 
the snap will be made from the succeeding spot. (4-3-4) 

11. Play: 3rd and 5 on the 50. The forward pass by 
Al is intercepted by Bl who advances a few steps 
and (hen kicks the ball, (a) A2 on his 30 yardline sig- 
nals for a fair catch; or (b) B2 recovers or catches 
the ball on A's 30 yardline and advances it for a 
touchdown. 

Ruling: In (a), since it is not a legal kick, the 
action of A2 has no force and A2 cannot make a fair 
catch. If A2 signals and catches the ball, he may 
advance it. He may be tackled by a B player and B 
may, in fact, interfere with A's opportunity to recover 
or catch the ball because the illegal kicking is con- 
sidered to be a fumble. A, of course, is privileged to 
take a penalty for the illegal kicking by B. In (b), the 
recovery of the kicked ball by B2 is legal and does no' 
cause the ball to become dead, nor is the advance of 
B2 prohibited. If A were to decline the penalty for the 
illegal kick by Bl, B2 will have scored a touchdown. 
The acceptance of the penalty for the illegal kicking by 
Bl will, of course, void the action of B2. (94-3; 8-2-1) 

Comment: Illegally kicking the ball, including a 
"return-kick" is administered as if the ball were batted 
or kicked during a fumble. Even though the penalty 
for the illegal act is declined, the action is not then 
considered to be a legal kick. Therefore, a ball kicked 
illegally into the end zone does not become a touchback 
because of touching someone or something in the end 
zone, nor can a fair catch be made of a ball so 
kicked. 

12. Play: 3rd and 5 on the 50. Al advances the 
ball to B's 30 where he kicks it. The ball goes into the 
end zone where it is caught or recovered by Bl who 
causes it to become dead there. The penalty for the 
illegal kick by A from B's 30 is: (a) accepted; or 
(b) declined. 

Ruling: In (a), 15 yard penalty for illegally kicking 
a loose ball (fumble) will be measured from the 30 
yardline, which is where the run ended and, thereby, 
placing the ball on B's 45. It will be A's ball, 1st and 
10. In (b), the declination of the penalty by B causes a 
touchback situation because A forced the ball into B's 
end zone where B recovered, or caught it and caused 
it to become dead. Therefore, it is B's ball, 1st and 10 
on its 20. (9-4-3; 8-5-3-c) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Page Eleven 



13. Play: After the ball is placed and declared 
ready-for-play, the snapper: (a) lifts the ball from the 
ground; or (b) rotates it on the ground after which 
the snapper removes his hand from the ball. 

Ruling: Foul in both (a) and (b). The snapper is 
considered to have moved the ball in other than a legal 
snap unless he completes his snap after he places his 
hand, or hands on the ball. He cannot lift the baU in 
any way after it has been placed ready-for-play. Any 
such movement of the ball causes it to become alive 
and the opponent may attempt to recover the ball. He 
may, of course, deliberately adjust the ball immediate- 
ly prior to making the snap. (7-1-3) 

14. Play: Prior to the snap, snapper Al tilts 
either end of the ball to the e.xtent that its long axis 
makes an angle of greater than 45 degrees with the 
ground. 

Ruling: Illegal snap. Referee should, if possible, 
declare the ball dead immediately and penahze as a 
foul between downs. (7-1-3) 

15. Play: While Rl is advancing a caught punt, 
R2 cUps. After the ball is dead, Kl piles on and R3 
slugs. 

Ruling: The penalty for the foul by R2 (clipping) 
is automatically accepted and then measured. The 
fouls by Kl and R3 occur during a dead ball and 
constitute a double foul, the penalties for which cancel. 
The ball is put in play at the spot where the measure- 
ment for the foul by R2 placed the ball. (10-4-2; 10-2-1-b) 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 
Governing- Baseball Tournaments 

(Adopted by the Board of Control) 
District and Regional Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the tournaments shall be 
determined by the Commissioner with the approval of 
the Board of Control. All tournaments will be held on 
or as near the dates indicated on the activities calen- 
dar as local conditions permit. 

II. Assignment of Schools to Districts and Regions 
The state shall be divided into districts and regions 

by the Commissioner who will assign the schools to 
the district tournament sites. 

III. Tournament Managers 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each of the districts and regions. It is the duty of the 
district manager to invite representatives of the schools 
in the district to a meeting held for the purpose of 
making tournament plans. It is the duty of the regional 
msmager to invite representatives of the district win- 
ners to a meeting held for the purposes of making 
tournament plans. The manager shall conduct the 
drawing, set the dates and times for games, and make 
all other arrangements for the tournament. 

IV. Contestants 

A school may enter one team in the district tourna- 
ment. The eligibility Ust for the players on this team 
shall be submitted to the manager prior to the tourna- 
ment. The eligibility list of each district winner shall 
be submitted to the manager prior to the regional 
tournament. 

V. District and Regional Meetings 

The district meeting shall be held in the afternoon 
of the first Sunday in IVIay, at 2:00 o'clock (EST and 
CDT, 1:00 CST) in the school designated as the tourna- 
ment site. The regional meeting shall be held on Sun- 
day afternoon, immediately following the district tourn- 
ament, at 2:00 o'clock (EST and CDT, 1:00 CST) m 
the school designated as the tournament site. A blind 
drawing shall be made for places in the bracket. 

VI. Umpires 

School representatives present at the drawing 



should select the umpires. If there is no agreement on 
officials, the decision of the tournament manager in 
selecting the umpires is final. 

VII. Champion 

The champion will be the team undefeated in a 
single elimination tournament. 

VIII. Regional and State Qualifying 

Only the district champion shall advance to the 
regional tournament, and only the regional champion 
shall advance to the state tournament. 

IX. Trophies and Awards 

Trophies will be given to the winning and runner- 
up teams. 

X. Regional Information 

The regional manager shall notify each district 
winning team manager of the time and place of the 
regional meeting. 

XI. Finances 

Net profits shaU be distributed among the partici- 
pating teams in the district and region. If there is a 
district deficit, the K.H.S.A.A. will give a maximum 
allowance per game. If there is a regional deficit, 
an allowance will be made by the K.H.S.A.A. 
State Regulations 

I. Date and Site 

The date and site of the tournament shall be 
determined by the Commissioner with the approval of 
the Board of Control. 

II. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall be the manager of the 
tournament. 

III. Contestants 

The regional winner may enter a team composed 
of fifteen players. No player may be substituted for 
any of tliese players after the tournament begins. The 
eligibility list including the names of these players 
shall be submitted to the manager prior to the tourna- 
ment. 

IV. Drawing 

A blind drawing shall be made by the tournament 
manager for places in the bracket. 
V. 

The umpires shall be selected by the toumamen; 
manager. 

VI. Champion 

The champion wiU be the team undefeated in a 
single elimination tournament. 

VII. Trophies and Awards 

Trophies will be given to the winning and runner-up 
teams. An award will be given to each player selected 
on the all-tournament team. 

VIII. Finances 

All proceeds shall be retained by the K.H.S.A.A. 
An expense allowance will be given each team partici- 
pating in the tournament. 



RULES AND REGULA1TONS 

Governing Tennis Tournaments 

(Boys & Girls) 

(Adopted by the Board of Control) 

Regional Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the tournaments shall be 
determined by the Commissioner with the approved of 
the Board of Control. All events wiU be held on or as 
near the dates indicated on the activities calendar as 
local conditions permit. 

II. Assignment of Schools to Regions 

The state shall be divided into tennis regions by 
the Commissioner who will assign the schools to the 
tournament sites. 

III. Regional Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1965 



Does Your Present Student 
Policy Cover Your Athletes? 
We Can Solve Your Problem. 



^Ite KUix^xlUn Qo4Kp4juiUf> 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 255-0837 



each of the regions. It is the duty of the manager to 
notify the regional schools of the time and place of 
the tournament, to supply them with entry blanks, to 
invite their participation, and to make all arrange- 
ments for the tournament. 

IV. Contestants 

A school may enter a doubles team and two 
singles players. No contestant shall compete in both 
the singles and doubles matches. 

V. Substitutes 

Any player whose name is on the eligibility list 
may be substituted for the original entry prior to the 
start of the match. 

VI. Pairings 

The manager may seed any number of the con- 
testants, and he may draw lor the remainig places. 
Singles players from the same school Shall be placed 
in opposite brackets. 

VII. 3<7le «>f Play 

All match play shall be two out of three sets in 
both singles and doubles. 

VIII. State Qualifying 

Eligible to enter the state tournament are regional 
entries who advance as far as the finals in the singles 
and the winner in the doubles. 

IX. State Information and Entry Blanks 

The coaches shall secure entry blanks from the 
regional manager before leaving the site of the tourna- 
ment. 

X. Faculty Sponsor 

Each school having participants in the tournciment 
shall send a faculty sponsor. 
Xi. Trophies and Awards 

School trophies wiU be given to the winners and 
runners-up in the doubles and singles. Individual 
awards will be given to the singles winner and to 
members of the winning doubles team. 



State Regulations 

I. Dates and Sites 

The dates and sites of the tournaments shall be 
determined by the Commissioner with the approval of 
the Board of Control. 

II. State Manager 

The Commissioner shall appoint a manager for 
each of the tournaments. 

III. Contestants 

Eligible to enter are regional entries who advanced 
as far as the finals in the singles, and the winners in 
the doubles. No contestant shall compete in both the 
singles and doubles matches. 

IV. Substitutes 

A substitution may be made on the doubles team 
prior to the start of the match. There can not be a 
substitution for a singles player. 

V. Pairings 

The manager may seed any number of the con- 
testants, and he may draw for the remaining places. 
Singles players from the same school shall be placed 
in opposite brackets. 

VI. Style of Play 

All match play shall be two out of three sets in 
both singles and doubles. 

VII. Expense Allowance 

The regional singles champion and members of the 
regional championship doubles teeim will receive ex- 
pense allowances. The coach will also receive £tn 
expense allowance. 
IX. Trophies and Awards 

School trophies will be given to the winners and 
runners-up in the doubles £ind singles. Individual 
awards will be given to the singles winner and runner- 
up, and to members of the winning and runner-up 
doubles team. 



Sntelif f e Has The 
$ii«^eaters and Jackets 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Servicer 10-Day Delivery 




V-NECK SLIP-OVER SWEATERS 

No. 1030— A Sand Knitting Mills sweater of 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each $ 1 3.95 

No. 530-CL — Another Sand sweater in solid white. 
Choice of cheerleaders, bands, etc. Also very popular 
as athletic awards. White only; each $10.95 

No. 30V— 100% wool. Stock colors— Black, Old Gold, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange; each $11.85 



AWARD JACKETS 
Write us for our Catalog with Special School Prices 



BUTTON FRONT COAT STYLE SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
lOOyo pure wool yarn. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors— Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $14.95 

No. 1520 — A companion sweater to the 58-W. Made 
by Sand in solid white coat style in medium weight. 
Sizes 34 to 46. White only. Colors are special order. 
This sweater is very popular with cheerleaders and 
bands. Each $ 1 3.95 

No. 2620J — A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — lOOyo pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, 
Purple; each _ $12.40 



WE OPERATE OUR OWN LETTERING DEPARTMENT 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.45; 8" letters $2.15; chenille bars, 50c each; 
chenille chevrons, 50c; name plates, 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and require three weeks for delivery. 



The SUTCLIFFE €0 

INCORPORATED 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



HUNT'S I 

I Award Jackets and Sweaters I 

We have a quantity of award jackets and sweaters in stock and can make im- W 

mediate shipment. Listed below are styles, colors, and sizes we can supply from w 

stock, but if your color or style is not listed, send us your order and we will for- 1^ 
ward it to the factory for prompt delivery. 

SWEATERS IN STOCK 

No. CBC heavy weight worsted cotton back coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $8.95 
No. BSC 100% heavy weight pure worsted, 3 ply, coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $12.45 
No. MBC medium weight pure worsted, 2 ply coat sweater. This is a Kiddie 
style and is just the thing for your mascot, or child. 
Colors: Scarlet, royal and white 
Sizes: 6, 8, 10 and 12. 

School Price: $6.45 
No. MBRB V-neck, medium heavy weight worsted pull-over for cheerleaders. 
Colors: White, black, kelly, Lt. gold. Old gold, royal, scarlet, 
Columbia Blue. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $8.45 
No. HIV heavy weight cheerleaders sweaters. 

Colors: White, kelly, scarlet, black, light gold. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $11.95 



JACKETS IN STOCK 

No. TS9 jacket of 24 oz. wool with iridescent lining: contrasting color leather 

armhole inserts; leather pocket trim; knit trim. 

Colors : scarlet with white ; royal with white. 

Sizes: Boys and Girls 30 thru 48. 

School Price: $15.00 
No. 302S jacket, 24 oz. wool reversed to satin; raglan sleeve style; iridescent 

lining; worsted mixed knit trim. 

Colors: Columbia Blue, grey, scarlet, and royal. 

Sizes: Boys and Girls 30 thru 48. 

School Price: $12.70 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 



OH 7-1941 



MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY' 



CH 7-1942 



^■F 





Hiqh School AthMe 



K. H. S. A. A. AREA BASKETBALL REPRESENTATIVES 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont; E. B. May, Jr., Prestonsburg; School Director 
Charlie Vettincr, Louisyille; Roy Winchester, Bethlehem; Goebel Ritter, Whitesburg. Second Row: Ernie 
Chattin. Ashland; Claude Ricketts, Valley Station; Jack Wise, Georgetown; Rex Alexander, Murray; 
Howard Gardner, Elizabethtown ; Bob Miller, Fort Thomas. Third Row: Harry Stephenson, Lexington; 
Bob Foster, Science Hill; Charlie Irwin, Hopkinsville; Turner EIrod, Bowling Green; Bill Nau, Bar- 
bonrrille; Roy Settle, Owensboro. 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



November, 1965 



»Bi 



One Of The Finest Jobs 

\ou as a coach of high school athletics have the 
pii\ ilege of working with the cream of the crop — the 
young men in your community who have the greatest 
stature and who greatly influence the younger genera- 
tioii. Coach, you have one of the finest jobs t'heie is iii 
America. Granted, it is a lot of work, time consuming, 
upsetting, and sometimes you may wonder whether o; 
not it is worth the "blood, sweat, and tears." However, 
your personal rewards are more than worth it. Since 
World War II we have had a great increase in our 
school population. We are feeling this increase in tlie 
secondary schools, and any guidance you can give the 
students will help you as a coach and the school as t, 
whole. I believe it is necessary that these people be sub 
jected to the kind of conduct befitting this generation 

Participation in a high school athletic progranj 
means much more than just competition between two 
indixiduals or two teams representing two different 
schools. The conduct of all the members of your teams 
is not only a reflection of you as a coach, but are also 
closely observed by the people of your community, ario 
of the visitors. It is important that their behavior be 
above reproach. Actually this should be true not onlj 
on the field of play but also in the class room, on thi 
campus, on trips, and in the community. 

It should be pointed out to your squads that they 
not only represent the team and coach but that thej 
reflect the behaviour of the entire community. Just as 
important is the impression they leave with junioi 
high school and grade school students. As we read 
article after article in our newspapers about the in- 
cidents involving the young people of oui' country, if 
appears to me that you have the greatest opportunitj 
to set an example to the boys on your teams and they 
in turn can demonstrate to the young people how to 
conduct themselves. 

We are all aware that boys have- several reasorL^ 
for competing in athletics, and aU of them are not in 
the best interest of your program. Some of them com- 
pete in athletics because they want recognition from . 
their fellow students, some are trying for a scholars- 
ship to aid them in receiving their college education, 
others are good enough in some sports to sign profes- 
sional contracts, some participate just for the love of 
the game, and many are on the squad with a purpose 
of belonging to a group. These are all woi-thwhile 
objectives for- them; however, I wonder if they are not 
missing the real reason for a high school athletic pro 
gram, which should be the developing of young men 
that are capable of assuming their place as younj: 
leaders in our communities. 

Our high school athletic program should teach all 
ol the boys fair play and sportsmanship, understanding 
and appreciation of team work, and that quitting means 
failure while hard work and loyalty means success. 

It is verj' interesting to read the biographies oi 
important people smd to discover how many of them 
took part in a high school athletic program. Certaiiilj 
not all of them were stars or on championship teams 
but they had the beginning of the necessary training 
to put them where they are today. It is the guidance 
they received during this formative period of theii 
lives that has aided many a successful business man 
today. 

The athletes we have on our squads today should 
be the leaders ol our student bodies. Thej should 
stand for the ideals of your school as other students 
are- impressed by their actions. When it comes to 
status and influence the monogramed letter of an 
athlete is important to the student body. I do not 
intend to infer that everj' athlete is going to be a 
leader. 

How much emphasis should you place on an athletic 



program? The answer is obvious "all you can". The 
primary purpose of an athletic program is not the 
reason for attending school Euid I believe that every- 
thing directly or indirectly pertaining to the academic 
program should be emphasized for all athletes. Ath- 
letics deserve their rightful place in a school system, 
and the einphasis placed on the athletic teams should 
not be greater or less than any other extra class 
activity in your school district. I know that it is very 
difficult from an administrator's point of view to treat 
every extra class activity with equality. Each program 
has different obpectives in its development, costs vary, 
there are different types and numbers of students, 
practices are held at various times, and each needs 
different facilities. With aU these variables it is impos- 
sible to administer all activities the same. In athletics 
you have the great public interest and where they 
share a great portion of your costs. With this interest 
you should have a great opportunity to sell your school 
to the people of your community. The problem of extra 
class activities must be solved by each school. It is im- 
possible for an outsider to help determine your program. 

Courts have held that Boards of Education can 
adopt any rule or regulation it wishes when they are 
reasonable and proper in governing the conduct of a 
student or athlete. We believe that when a student's 
conduct is detrimental to others and the student's 
presence might adversely affect the morale, disrupt 
the orderly operation of social activities, or interfere 
with discipline and governing of students, then it is 
time for someone to make order and correct the situa- 
tion. 

Should athletes be distinguished from other students 
when it comes to conduct? High School athletes are 
always in the public limelight. Whatever they do good 
or bad is magnified 100 times by a clamoring public. 
They are different. They aren't looked upon in the 
same manner as other students, nor can they be 
treated under the same general nales. If a school is 
going to avoid trouble in its handling of these special 
students, it had better have special procedures pre- 
pared in advance. 

Schoolmen agree that one of the best ways to 
manage such problems is to enforce a policy setting 
up standards of student conduct, and consequences for 
misconduct. They also agree that when decisions must 
be made quickly or under pressure, the best advice is 
to stick to the rules of conduct. 

What kind of policy? You as a coach should be the 
most important person in estabUshing a set of rules 
or athletic code. You should also be the one to admin- 
ister it, and the better job you do, the better coacli 
you will be. A boy that breaks the rules will also miss 
the important play. Do not hide under the principal's 
coat tails; however, his are the final decisions, as he 
is responsible for the conduct of the entire school. 

Tlie primary long-range benefit of written rul&s or 
athletic code of conduct, or any disciplinary policy for 
athletics is the consistency of action on the part of the 
school administration, including coaches and teachers, 
cuid confidence that the community will develop in its 
school. 

In dealing with the discipUne of athletics it has 
always bothered me for many years and that is the 
publicity given by the newspapers when boys are 
dropped from the squad for breaking training, or for 
scholastic work. This is all right for the University 
but I do not believe it should be in high school. I know 
it is news for the paper and the readers would prob- 
ably be interested, but it is not good publicity for the 
school, the athletic program, and particularly the boys 
involved. It would be better for you to just drop the 
boy from the squad without mentioning publicly the 
reason why. 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. xxvm— NO. 4 



.NOVEMBER, 1965 



$1.00 Per Year 



Football Questions — Installment 2 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These interpretations of the 1965 
National Alliance Football rules do not set aside nor 
modify any ruSe. They are made and published by 
the National Federation of State High School Athletic 
Associations in response io situations presented. 

16. Play: Snapper tilts the ball to an angle of ap- 
proximately 75 degrees. 

Ruling: Snap infraction. The referee should use his 
whistle, to prevent the ball from being put into play as 
soon as the foul occurs, provided he can stop action 
before the snap. If he sounds his whistle immediately 
after the foul, not waiting for the ball to become dead 
for some other reason, the whistle causes the ball to 
remain dead as of the time of the foul. 

Comment: In the play above, the ball does not be- 
come alive and subsequent action has no significance 
unless it is unsportsmanlike. As provided by 2-26, the 
snap begins when the snapper first moves the ball 
other than in adjustment. Because the adjustment is 
not part of the snap, it does not cause the ball to 
become alive and is of itself a foul between downs. 
(7-1-3, 2-26). 

17. Play: Snapper Al tilts the ball to an angle of 
about 75 degrees. Before the official can sound his 
whistle to prevent the ball from going into play, Al 
lifts the ball and snaps it. 

Ruling: Snap infraction. The ball has become alive 
and the offended team (B) may take the 5-yard penalty 
measured from the spot of the snap, or team B may 
refuse the penalty and take the play. (7-1-3). 

18. Play: Snapper Al uses both hands to adjust the 
ball. While holding it motionless with his right hand 
he deliberately and slowly removes his left hand so 
that the snap will be made with one hand only. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. (7-1-2, 7-1-3). 

19. Play: Team A is granted a charged time-out. 
Before the ball is put in play following the time-out 
charged to Team A, Team B requests a charged time- 
out. 

Ruling: The request of Team B must be denied. No 
time-out may be granted to either team in this situa- 
tion until after the ball has become alive. (3-5-2). 

20. Play: At the kick-off: (a) Kl is offside; or (b) 
R has only 4 players between its 45 and the 50-yard 
line; or (c) R4 catches the kick on his 15 and advances 
to his 40 where he is tackled. R3 clips on R's 35 dur- 
ing the runback. 

Ruling: If the offended team accepts the penalty in 
either (a) or (b) the ball must again be free kicked 
after the measurement. If the penalty is accepted in 
(c) it will be R's baU, 1st and 10 on R's 20. If in (c) 
the penalty is declined, it will be R's ball, 1st and 10 
on R's 40. (5-2-4, 10-3-3). 

21. Play: Runner Al fumbles when he is tackled. A2 
or Bl, attempting to recover the ball, uses his hand or 
arm on an opponent's back or other part of his body. 

Ruling: Legal action. AH players are privileged to 
attempt to recover a fumble and may legally use their 
hands or arms on an opponent (including his back) 
to push the opponent out of the way. (2-4). 

22. Play: 3rd and 3 on the 50 yardline. Al advances 
to B's 20 yardline where he fumbles. The fumble is 



recovered by Bl who advances to B's 45 yardline 
where his lateral pass is intercepted by A2 who re- 
turns the ball to B's 15 yardline. A2 crawls after vhe 
ball has been declared dead. B2 balds at B's 30 during 
the run by Bl. 

Ruling: Penalty for the foul by B2 is automatically 
declined, thereby enabling A to retain the ball. The 
line-to-gain is ejtablished on B's 5 yardline. The stakes 
are set and then the penalty for delay of game (crawl- 
ing) is administered, placing the ball on B's 20 yard- 
line. It will be A's ball, 1st down, 15 yards to go on 
B's 20. (10-1-2-c; 9-5-1). 

23. Play: Bl intercepts a legal forward pass and 
during the runback, B2 holds on B's 30 yardline, after 
which B3 clips on B's 45 yardline. The pass was in- 
tercepted on the 20 yardline and the ball became dead 
on the 50 yardline. A2 piled on after the ball had 
become dead. 

Ruling: B's ball, 1st and 10 on B's 30 yardline. Even 
though Team B has commited a multiple foul, the 
automatic provision prevails and the official will 
administer the penalty for the holding foul by B2 
from B's 30 yardline, because the rule provides that 
'the penalty is automatically either accepted or de- 
clined, depending on the advantage accruing to the 
offended team." The greater advantage, in this case, 
would occur as a result of the assessment of the 
penalty for the holding foul from B's 30 yardline. 
Thereafter, the penalty for A's dead ball foul would 
be administered. There is no choice for Team A in 
this situation, since the coverage provides for auto- 
matic administration. (10-1-2-c) 

24. Play: Al advances beyond the line to B's 30, 
where he throws a backward pass which is caught by 
A2 on B's 35. A2 advances for a touchdown. 

Ruling: The first run ended on B's 30. The first 
running play ended where A2 secured possession, i. 
e., B's 35. 'The second run ended at B's goal line where 
the ball became dead. If a foul occurred during the 
first running, the basic enforcement spot is where the 
first run ended. If the foul occurred during the second 
running play, the basic enforcement spot is where the 
second run ended, i. e., B's goal line. (10-3-3). 

25. Play: Team A comes to the linc-of-scrlramage 
and its members position themselves in preparation 
for the snap. All 11 players are stationary for more 
than 1 full second. Then, back A2, from a position of 
more than one yard behind the line-of-scrimmage, 
starts in motion backward. After a 2 count, he comes 
to a stationary stop. Immediately thereafter, back A3 
starts in motion backward. The ball is snapped while 
A3 is in motion. A2 was stationary at the snap but 
he had not been stationary for 1 full sescond before 
A3 started in motion. 

Ruling: Legal action. So long as A2 (who in this 
ease was more than 1 yard behind the line-of-scrim- 
mage when he started) is stationary when A3 starts 
his motion, there has been no infraction. (2-25). 

26. Comment: The expression "nearly" (almost) at 
rest" is a descriptive way of indicating that, for the 
play situatton related and in the opinion of the of- 
ficial, the residue of the original force or inertia is 
insufficient to carry the grounded ball across the 

(Continued on Page Six) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



NOVEMBER, 1965 



VOL, xxvni— NO. 4 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Higrh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 46501 

Second class postagre paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Don Davis 
(1963-67). independence; Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse 
Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68), Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

^lom the Lyomniissionel s CJffice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1965 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation bas- 
ketball examination will be given all over 
Kentucky on Monday, December 6, to offi- 
cials who wish to work for the Approved 
and Certified ratings. Officials registered 
with the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this 
year and who have not been registered 
previously in any other state association, 
are not eligible to take the test. Those 
interested should advise the State Office 
immediately in order that necessary ar- 
rangements can be made with the school 
administrators who will supervise the taking 
of the exam. Officials living in Kentucky 
need not suggest the name of an examiner. 
The Approved rating does not carry forward 
from year to year, but must be earned each 
year. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 



(List Compiled November 1) 
telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
me phone number unless otherwise designated. If 



two numbers are given, the first number is that of the 
me phone. 

iir, William, Box 532, Wheelwright, 2741 
rr, Billy W., Longview Drive, Franklin 
udill, William Victor, 420 Morgantown Ed.. 
586-4187 

c, 1680 Newbrook Dr 

.. 466 Lima Drive, Lexingto 



Franklin. 



823 South 5th St.. Ironton, Ohio 
m Robert, D-31.3 Shawneetown, Lexington, 278- 



San Franeisi 



Farina, Lawre 
Foster, Eddie 

7319 

Frecka, Jerry, 

Hamlin, Willii 

2535 
Harris. Mickey E., B-2/10 Cav., APO 

California 

Jenkins, Beryl M., 2326 South 11th St., Ironton. Ohio, 532-6215 
Johnson, Robert L., 6 Jamestown Place, Clarksville, Tennessee, 

647-3982. 4781 
Kessel, H. R.. 407 Elmwood, Athens. Ohio 
Lehkamp. Kenneth, 184 Valley View, Southgate. 441-1475, 

694-6112 
Meeks, Jack F., 4th Street Rd., Corbin, 528-5404 
Miller, Everett, 4108 Riverview, Middletown, Ohio, 423-9978, 

425-3276 
Morissey, Thomas, 521 Maple Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 761-8349 
Murphy, Lance W., Morehead State College, Box 86, Morehead. 

ST 4-9007 
Partin. Billy Ray, P. O. Box 41. Four Mile, 337-3185 
Phipps. James M., 1333 South 3rd St., Louisville 
Russell, Kenneth E., Chauncey, Ohio, RA 5-3553 



Staples, Jerry, 803 Letcher St.. Henderson, 826-4882, 826-9085 
Terhune, Calvin Traman, 2125 Talisman, Lexington, 277-8707, 

266-3135 
Young, Jack, 132 Smith Ballard, Richmond. 623-4589, 623-2334 
Welch, Robert J., Jr.. 1406 Beech, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-3408, 

872-4300 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on Saturday af- 
ternoon October 9, 1965. The meeting was 
called to order by President Foster J. 
Sanders at 1:00, with Board members Mor- 
ton Combs, Don Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, 
Sherman Gish, Preston Holland, Don R. 
Rawlings and Oran C. Teater; Commissioner 
Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Commis- 
sioner J. B. Mansfield present. The invoca- 
tion was given by Morton Combs. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don 
Davis, that the reading of the minutes of 
the July 31st meeting be waived, since the 
members of the Board received copies of 
these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that, acting 
under authority given him by the Board in 
track regulations adopted in the July meet- 
ing, he and Assistant Commissioner Mans- 
field were in the process of assigning schools 
maintaining track teams to classes and re- 
gions, but that the assignment had not been 
completed. A report on the new plan will be 
made at a subsequent meeting of the Board. 

President Sanders announced the ap- 
pointment of the following committees for 
1965-66: 

Policy — Chairman Don Davis, Preston 
Holland, Morton Combs 

Builget — Chairman Don R. Rawlings, 
Sherman Gish, Ralph C. Dorsey 

Trophy — ^Chairman Oran C. Teater, 
Theo. A. Sanford, J. B. Mansfield 

Swimming — ^Chairman Alfred M. Reece 
(Lexington), E. W. Craik (Louisville), Jack 
Thompson (Louisville), Marshall Beard 
(Louisville), Miss Sheila Gilreath (Ash- 
land), Don Davis (Independence) 

Wrestling — Chairman Orville Williams 
(Seneca), Will D. Evans (Ky. School for the 
Blind), Bro. Leopold (St. Joseph Prep.), Don 
R. Rawlings (Danville) 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded Ralph 
C. Dorsey, that the next meeting of the 
Board be held in Lexington on December 18, 
1965. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Mor- 
ton Combs, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning July 1, 1965, and 
ending September 30, 1965, be allowed. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



Page Three 



In Memoriam 




CHARLES ELLIS NORRIS 

Charles Ellis Norris, who taught and 
coached at the McKee High School for 
eighteen years, died on August 23, 1965, 
after a year's illness. He was 44 years of 
age. 

Charlie Norris graduated from the 
McKee High School in 1940 as valedictorian 
of his class. During his high school years 
he was active in all sports. He attended 
Eastern Kentucky State College, where he 
played Freshman basketball and pitched on 
the baseball team. After receiving his A.B. 
degree from Eastern, he returned to the 
McKee High Shcool as a faculty member. 
He was active in his work until his illness 
forced him to quit. 

At McKee Coach Norris earned the 
reputation of being one of the most capable 
and efficient teachers who has ever been 
associated with the Jackson County School 
system. His love for sports was evident in 
the many years he gave to coaching. 
Through his dynamic personality, Charlie 
gained the love and respect of every boy who 
was associated with his teams. It had been 
decided that he was to use his talents and 
years of experience as Athletic Director of 
the new consolidated Jackson County High 
School which is to be completed for the 
1966-67 school year. 

Surviving Mr. Norris are his wife, Mrs. 
Hazel Martin Norris; and a son, Charles 
Michael Norris, age 16., a senior at McKee 
High School. 

R.B.M. 



Certified and Approved Officials 

The name of Ted Osborne was listed 
incorrectly in the October issue of the ATH- 
LETE on the list of Approved football offi- 
cials. Mr. Osborne has the Certified rating. 

Tom Roe Frazer has recently qualified 
as an Approved football official. 

Football Schools 

Omitted from the list of football schools 
and coaches which appeared in the October 
issue of the ATHLETE were the following: 

Bishop David, Louisville, Denny Nash ; 
Hiseville (8-man), Hiseville, Bob Driver; 
Louisville County Day, Louisville, Dudley 
Hoffman; Pleasure Ridge Park, Louisville, 
Bob Williams. 

SUPPLMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 



(List Compiled No 



nber 1) 



official listed, it 

3e designated. If 

is that of the 



109, Boonville, Indiana, 753-4364 



If one telephone number is given for 
is the home phone number unless other 
two numbers are given, the first numb 
home phone. 

Alexander. Ronnie G 

(Bus.) 

Allen, Ed L., 1101 Booth Ave., Owensboio, 684-5670, 683-3112 
Allen, Lowry, R., 186 Audubon Drive, Bowling Green, 842-0236 
Archibald. Larry, 212 3rd Street, Augusta 
Arnold, Gabriel T., 104 Tanglewood Tr., Anchorage, 895-5243, 

ME 7-1421 ext. 206 
Bates, Ronald B., No. 1, Waynesburg, 379-4403 
Benningfield, Jerry, 3416 Monarch Dr., Louisville, EM 8-1937, 

637-1421 
Bienick, Stanley, 11702 Harden Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 825- 

5551, 681-2945 
Bland, Kenneth E., Route No. 2, Box 99, Morehead, 784-5712, 

784-4992 
Blum, Martin, P. O. Box 658, Morehead St. College, Morehead 
Bourgery, Robert H., 10 Manchester, Barbourville 
Boyd, Tommy, 7908 Greenway Dr.. Louisville, 425-6417, ME 7- 

1619 
Brown, Fred V., 706 Bellefonte Rd., Ashland, 325-2868 
Browning, W. A., Paintsville, 297-3502, 789-3250 
Bruner, Jack C, Route 5. Box 29J. London, 864-4322, 864-2701 
Butler. Robert, 1330 Maple Ave.. Owensboro. 684-7016, 684-5285 
Byron, Louis S., Jr., 513 Pine St., Louisville, 686-4424, 447- 

3442 
Canady. Ray B., Court Square. Bai'bourville 
CaiT, Gene P., 2210 Phelps St., Ashland, 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon, 349-3896, 349-3194 
Carter, Phillip Ray, Whitley City. 376-2517. 376-2213 
Cavil, Leonard J., .310 East Maple St, Nicholasville, 5-4849 

(Bus.) 
Chaney, Bobby L., West Elm St., Clay, 664-2110, 664-2227 
Clary, Kenneth, 33 S. Holloway, Henderson 

Claypool, Thomas Wayne, Route No. 2, Owensboro, 684-8719 
Clemmons, Sam, 636 Central. Lexington, 256-3662, 255-5736 
Collier, Burnard, Route No. 1. Box 24, Pikeville, GE 7-4344 
Collier, Virgil, 903 Atkinson. Henderson, VA 6-8016. VA 6-3429 
Colvin, Jack E., 3606 N. Evans Ave., Evansville, Ind., 423- 

1696, 426-2314 
Cooper, Hewlett, Hazel Road. Murray. 753-3336, 763-3381 
Cornett, Ray, Gilley 
Cosby Carel A., 568 Magie Ave.. Hamilton, Ohio, 895-7289, 

423-4491 
Cox, Rufus A., Route No. 4, Island Ford Rd., Madisonville, 

821-2692, 821-2126 
Coy, Charlie S., Boston 

Crawford, Donald, 112 Cypress, Nicholasville, 264-5131, 277-3571 
Critz, George Andrew, 126 University Ave., Lexington, 278-2937, 

Grouse, James W., Box 276, Dixon, ME 9-5146 

Davenport, Robert B., 199 Madison. Danville, 236-2684, 748- 

5180 
Denton, William D., 127 Hubbard Lane, Henderson, VA 6-4020 
Dingus. Charles, Box 107, Martin. BU 6-3259 
Diuquid, Ray, 2607 Thomas St., Hopkinsville, 885-3131, 886-3389 
Downey, James B., 2128 Oleander Dr., Lexington, 277-9122 
Downs. Joe, 829 Bartley Ave., Bardstown 
Duff, Birchell, Garrett, 447-2192 
Duggins, Michael, 516 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, 341-0786, 282- 

1626 
Duncan, Earl S.. 10.007 Taylorsville Rd., Jeffersontown, AN 7- 

1478, 895-0668 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



Eldvidge, James E., Haldeman. 784-5792 

Elmore, Jimmv A., 613 Sunrise Lane, Elizabethtown, 765-6262, 

765-6207 
Evans, Clark, Martha. 652-3776 

Farmer, Jack, 1014 W. Lexington, Danville, 236-3192, 236-2711 
Finlev, Sam, 4609 E. Manslick Rd., Louisville, 964-1652, 582- 

8696 
Foster, Eddie P., 466 Lima Drive, Lexington, 254-0978, 254- 

7319 
Fowler, Ronald S., 338 Strawberry Drive, Maysville, 664-4998, 

564-3860 
Frank, Charles E., 721 Highland. Ft. Thomas, 441-7084, 562-5343 
Friedly. Gary. 710 B Warrendale. Gerogetown. 770 
Frye. Gil, 375 E. Water, Flemingsburg, 846-1401, 846-2551 
Fryrear. David. 4464 S. 6th St., Louisville, 363-9768 
Gabbard, John B., 320 North Hill St., London, 864-5916, 864- 

2863 
Gaines, Harvey, 762 South 43rd St.. louisville, 778-3854 
Gaither. Gene, P. O. Box 103, Beaver Dam. 274-3885, 274-4906 
Gentry, Dale James, 4945 Determine Lane, Louisville, 447-6981, 

585-5814 
Gibson, Fred W., 2109 Townhouse Apartments. Charlestown 

Rd., New Albany, Ind.. WH 5-0018, Louisville 774-2353 
Goocey. Freddie, Vincent, 593-2317 
Graham. Ronnie, Box 218, Lynch, 848-5446 
Graham. Jim, 4505 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, 324-8169, 324- 

1155 ext. 376 
Gray, Raymond, Livermore, 278-2615 

Greer, Daniel. J. I., Route No. 2, Kuttawa 388-7307, 362-8062 
Greer, Tom, P. O. Box 73. Lynch, 848-5910, 848-5901 
Gumm. Kenneth E., 7304 Edenberry Lane, Louisville, 969-7336, 

454-7611 ext. 4559 
Hagedorn, Thomas. 156 Clover Ridge, Ft. Thomas, 441-3973, 

562-7741 
Halcomb, Ralph W.. 1229 South 4th St.. Louisville, 636-1841 
Hall, Billv Joe. 1142 Ojibwa Trail, Frankfort, 227-2962, 227- 

2231 ext. 414 
Hall. Jack R., Blue Grass Acres. Richmond, 623-6780, 623-4969 
Ham, Ronald, 1204 Delmar. Evansville, Ind. 422-3371, 424-2434 
Haney, James, 206 Limestone. Somerset, 679-1440 
Harper. Randall H., 5000 Ventura Drive, Valley Station, 937- 

5319, 772-3661 ext. 525 
Harris, Mickey. E., B-2/10 Cav., APO 96206, San Francisco, 

California 
Hausfeld, Walter, 3080 Crestmoor Lane, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

922-6164 
Haynes, William T.. 1011 Second St., Henderson, VA 7-3388 
Hendrick, Kenny, Route No. 7, Bowling Grene, 843-3428 
Hinton, Noah Spears, Jr., Box 612. Pikeville College, Pike- 

ville. 437-4427 
Holland. David, Beechmont, 476-8248 
Hook, Don, Route No. 1. Cunningham, 642-2891 
Hopper, Marion W., Box 191. Munfordville 
Howard, Carl, Route No. 1. Lynnville, 382-2176 
Howard, Robert E.. 4302 Naomi, Louisville. 969-7619, 969-1900 
Hunter, Wayne C. Route No. 1, Nicholasville, 885-3110, 885- 

3110 
Hume, Charles E.- 1909 Benson, Bowling Green, 843-3730, 

843-3730 
Jenkins, Beryl M.. 2326 South 11th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-5215 
Johnson, James M., 174 Pinehurst, Frankfort, 223-2822, 223-8369 
Johnson, Leroy, Lamb, 434-8296 
Johnson. Robert L., 6 Jamestown Place. Clarksville. Tenn., 

647-3982, 4781 
Johnson, Ronald L.. 1623 South Virginia, Hopkinsville, 6-6242 
Jones. William L.. 814 McCoUum, Elizabethtown, 766-6061. 

765-6247 
Justice, Monty D.. Jr., 8608 Perry Rd., Lyndon. 897-2693, 774- 

6507 
Keeling, Joe, 241D Brodawav, Paducah, 443-2653, 442-2167 
Keller, Terry Joe. 209 Oak St., Ludlow 
King, Russell, 94S Whitney, Lexington. 254-3049 
Lehkamp, Kenneth. 184 Valley Veiw, Southgate, 441-1475, 

694-6112 
Logue, Ronald G., 514 Maple Ave., Danville, 236-3680, 236-390E 
Long, James E.. Baskett, VA 7-5000, 633-6421 
Long. Robert F,. 664 Lombardy, Lexington, 299-7226, 252-262e 
Luebbers, Leonard, 1147 Woody Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471- 
3122, 231-0665 

Lynn, Robert E.. 211 Barbour St.. Providence, 821-9091 (Bus., 
McCoy, James W., 237 Kenton St., Bromley, 261-3368 
McGlothlin, Leonard. 1912 Mt. Vernon Drive, Owensboro, 684 
7065, 683-2401 ext. 618 

McGuire, Herbert W., 830 Boyd, Danville, 230-6545, 236-5211 
McKinney, Adelle F., 6421-C Mulvaney, Ft. Knox, 4-5860, 4- 
4558 

Martin, Delano, Box 176. Hindman, 785-5193 
Maynard, Raymond Leon. Box 87, Warfield, 395-5120 
Meadows, Marvin, Clavhole. 666-5067, 666-2481 
Miller, Bob, 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, 441-5886, 694-6535 
Miller, Evei-ett J., 4108 Riverview, Middletown, Ohio, 423-9978, 

425-3276 
Mingua, Ronald L., Route No. 1, Germantown, 728-2587 
Mitchell, William N., 6711 Green Meadow Court, Louisville, 

895-0888 
Moore, James E., Larkslane 

Mudd, Ed.. 3512 Mildred Dr.. Louisville, 448-1609 
Murray. William D., Box 667, College Station, Murray, 753- 

7976 



Namciu, John, Box 52, College Station, Murray, 762-3698, 

762-3811 
Napier. Wallace R., Mary Alice, 573-3721 
Nash, Dennis B„ 2426 Donna Road, Louisville, 447-8161, 447- 

3442 
Noble, Howard W., 415 Hill St., Hazard, 436-4630 
Nord, Ed, 7005 Green Manor Drive, Louisville, 239-9150, 895- 

3401 ext. 202 
O'Daniel, Benny, 623 A. N. Addison. Lexington, 252-4626 
O'Nan, Norman, 3020 Elmwood, Hendei-son, 7-3968, 6-9578 
Owens, Thomas J., 1317 Nancy Hanks Lane, Apt. No. 1, Lex- 
ington, 254-2075 
Padgett, R. K., 202i/> College St., Somerset, 678-6485, 678-4141 
Partin. Billy Ray, P. O. Box 41, Four Mile, 337-3185 
Pate, Roy E., Henryville, Indiana, 796-6196, Louisville 368-6831 
Patterson, Bill, 574 Oak St.. Madisonville. 821-1359, 821-6833 
Paxton, Gary R., 1041 Cross Keys Rd., Lexington, 277-9024, 

277-9024 
Petett, Frank M.. 207 6th St., Tompkinsville, 487-6118, 487-6217 
Phelps, Ray, Box 633, Russell, 836-6646- 324-0309 
Phipps, James M., 1333 South 3rd St., Louisville 
Poling, Michael Lee, 624 20th St., Dunbar, W. Va. 
Powers. Samuel, P., 705 Fulton, Tell City. Ind., KL 7-8508 
Presnell, Tommy, Box 180, Versailles, 873-4745. 873-3511 
Priar, Glover, Jr., 900 East Glenn Court, Owensboro 684-0027, 

683-3112 
Price, Charles A., 3446 13th St., Ashland, 325-3854, 324-3177 
Piyor. Chrales W., 8939 Applewood Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Radjunas, Eddie, 1644 Elliott, Ashland, 324-1896, 324-1896 
Radjunas. Stan, 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, 324-1896, 324-1896 
Rankin, James M., 3504 Del Park, Louisville, 778-1245, 454- 

4233 
Reschar, John V., Sr., 5518 Pico Lane, Louisville, 969-3885, 

937-2300 
Reynolds, Thomas K., 2417 Monroe, Ashland, 324-1813 
Richardson. Charles E.. Waco. 369-5992, 369-5595 
Rickard, Bob, 1712 Mohawk, Owensboro, 684-0658. 683-7730 
Ring, Bill. 481 Rookwood Parkway, Lexington, 299-7089, 264- 

1776 
Roach. Earl W., Star Route, Mayfield, 247-6078, 376-2236 
Roby, Joseph L., P. O. Box 1504, Owensboro, 684-6786, 684-3209 
Roe. Doyle. Jr.. Isom, 633-2058 
Royse, Pete, 220 Richmond Ave., Nicholasville, 885-4975, 252- 

2200 ext. 2142 
Runyon, Tommy Dean, Box 181, Belfry, 353-7883 

Sanders, Jack E., C-207 Price Rd., Lexington, 255-3600, 254- 

8810 
Sanders, Mel, 3910 Sunset, Paducah, 442-3650, Brookport, 

III., 4441 
Schad, Jim, 10717 Chelmsford Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio. 825-3343 
Schlich, Paul E., 3315 Dean Drive, Louisville, 458-6765, 896-0211 
Schlickman. Steve, 403 Delmar, Covington, 341-6097 
Schlosser. J. Paul, 1971 N. Lynndale, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521- 

6162, 621-6162 
Schmitt, Paul E., 3864 Darlene Drive, Louisville, 778-5355, 

635-6251 
Schmidt, Thomas C 9208 Matilda Court, Louisville, 964-1246, 

452-9791 
Schnebelt, Carl R„ Box 334, Hanover, Ind., 866-3681, 866-4561 
Schneider, Robert, 19 Woodlawn Terrace, Newpoprt 781-0103. 

441-7100 
Scott. Emmanuel H., 1614 Potter Place, Cincinnati, Ohio, 281- 

6928 
Scott, Kenneth E., 301 Blair, Richmond. 623-3789, 623-2884 
Scott, Sidney H., Albany, 387-6122, 387-3191 

Scott, W. L., 1816 McDonald Rd.. Lexington, 278-2844, 252-3595 
Scott. Willie L., 217 Showalter Dr., Gerogetown, 1964, 1743 
Sellier, Ed. 2261 Winterberry, Lexington, 278-1465. 277-5122 
Sellman, John B., 4031 Oilman Ave., Louisville 897-2757, 582- 

Settle, Roy G., 1618 Sioux Place, Owensboro, 683-2136, 684-9441 
Sexton, Steven, C. P. O. Box 354, Whitesburg, 633-2980 
Sharp. Lloyd, Dixon, 639-5267, 639-2861 
Shartzer, E. Philip, 3906 Jewell Ave., Louisville, 772-0021, 

636-1361 
Shaver, Perry Allen, Box 128, 526-3493, 525-3551 
Shaw. Earl 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370. 648-2208 
Shelton. Benny Ray. 300 Parker, Mayfield, 247-6664, 247-3061 
Sherrow. Winston G., Beattyville, 464-8444, 464-2692 
Shewcraft, Clifford G., Route No. 2, Calvert City, 395-5421 
Shirlev, Michael D., Jr., 9818 Caven Ave., Louisvillle. 969-8801 
Shope. Lowell M., Box 266 South Webster, Ohio, BL 9-5601, 

PR 8-2425 
Showalter, John. 116 Military, Georgetown, 662 
Shuck. Thomas G., 2059 A. Georgian Way, Lexington, 277- 

8780 254-0693 
Silliman, William Gerald, 3302 Radiance Rd., Louisville, 461- 

9512, 634-1611 
Simpson, Fred C, 513 St. Joseph Lane, Apt. 21, Park HiUs. 
Covington 
Sims. Frank D., 5303 Regent Way. Louisville, 964-6493, 364- 

1511 ext. 269 
Singleton. Bobby, 5711 Omega Drive, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

937-4712, 937-4712 
Singleton, Ronnie H., 3653 Elderwood Way, Apt. 8, Louisville, 

363-5277, 772-3661 ext. 498 
Sizemore, Aster, Hazard, 436-3711 (Bus.) 
Skaggs. Billy C, 390 Sagasser, Somerset. 679-2354, 678-5141 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



Page Five 



Slusher, Wayne C, 407 Byrd St., Covington, 681-5914 

Smith, Bill Gene, Box 3, Georgetown, 832-4471, 635 

Smith, C. W., Route No. 1, Oakland, 563-2441, 842-1343 

Smith, David, 121 E. Locust, Richmond 

Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville, 458-1286, 

366-0396 
Smith, Elijah, Route No. 2, Pineville, 337-3750 
Smith. James Gayle, Box 202, Burlington. 586-6048, 586-7200 
Smith, Roy M., Watts 
Smith, Thomas W., 2915 Sheldon Rd., Louisville, 458-3934, 

582-3611 
Smith, W. Jack, 203 Ohio St., Somerset, 679 - 1211, Russell 

Springs. 868-4863 
Smith, Wayne N., 313 Beechwood Dr., Campbellsville, 465- 

6268, Columbia, Ky., 384-2751 
Smith, Willard N., 904 Rose Crest Ave., Box 23, Campbells- 
ville, 465-5339, 465-4191 
Smith, William E., 4122 St. John's Terrace, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

791-3082. 731-2341 ext. 266 
Smith, Winfred Clark, Chavies 
Smithson, Richard A., 1945 Nashville Rd., Bowling Green, 

VI 3-4844, VI 2-1674 
Solomon, Jim, 931 Pine. Benton, 527-8760, 627-2781 
Sosh, La Rue, Uniontown, 822-4213, 822-4444 
Sosh, Nelson, Uniontown, 822-4212, 822-4200 
South, Douglas E., Summit. 862-1265, 862-1924 
Sparks, Bobby, 208 McWhorter, London, 864-6364 
Sparks, Keith Emanuel, Jr., 6600 Watch Hill Rd., Louisville, 

239-9093, 366-9511 ext. 289 
Sparrow, Jim, 313 Granndview, Lawrenceburg, 839-4157 
Spaulding. Stan, 210 South Market, Waverly, Ohio, 947-4912, 

947-2484 
Speck, Michael E., 205 Sunset, Elizabethtown, 765-6385, 862- 

1924 
Spencer, Irv., Old State Rd., Brandenburg, 422-6382, 937-2300 
Spiceland, S. E., 306 South 13th, Murray, 763-2811 
Spoonamore. Jim, 111 Pettus, Stanford, 366-2348 
Spradlin, Robert, W. VanLear, Paintsville, 789-4166 
Stark, Douglas, Route No. 2, Bedford, 255-3336 
Starks, James, Elm St., Mortons Gap, BL 8-5313 
Staton. Jimmy F., Tollesboro, 798-2522 
Stauffer, Frank, Tyrone Rd., Lawrenceburg, 839-6350 
Steenken, William R., 1636 Highland, Covington, 331-3789, 

431-3108 
Stephens, Herbert D., 133 First St., West, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry, 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1757, 255- 

2960 
Stethen, Jim, Stone St.. Bedford, 265-3285 
Stevens, Alex, Valley Rd.. Danville, 236-2792 (Bus.) 
Stiff, Maurice, 2150 Glenworth Ave., Louisville, 454-7808, 585- 

Stikeleather, Clyde L., 201 Goff Dr., Leitchfield, 259-3885, 

259-3387 
Stines, Ray A., 221 Dorchester Rd., Anchorage, 895-8604, 425- 

Stinson, Charles L., Maple St., Horse Cave. 786-2711. 786-7131 
Stith, Houston, 4809 Red Start Rd., Louisville, 969-9094 
Stoess, Henry L., Kavanaugh Rd., Crestwood, 241-4196, 687- 

0691 
Stokes. Bob, Allensville St., Elkton, 265-2232, Louisville, Ky., 

937-2300 
Stokes, Tommy G., Route No. 3, Madisonville, 821-6175 
Stovall, Tom E., P. O. Box 73, Graham, 338-1773 
Strain, Richard P., Box 62, Triangle Trailer Pk., Radcliff, 

351-4306 
Strong, Arnett, 116 Ky. Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436-2141 
Strong, David Alton, 607 Barger St., Mayfield, 247-7634 
Stroud. Donnie M., 173 Tennyson, Owensboro, MU 4-5401, MU 

4-1422 
Sturgill, Larry, Thealka, 789-4684 
Sucietto, Richard, 6572 Gaines Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 621-7495, 

521-4280 ext. 379 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 2083 Old Nassau Rd., Lexixngton, 277- 

6963, Frankfort 223-8221 ext. 761 
Summers, Charles R., 410 Cherry St., Greenville, 338-3740, 

338-2911 
Sumner. Carl, 2603 Proctor Knott Dr., Louisville, 454-7294, 

896-4225 
Switzer. Richard J., 3 Circle Dr., Florence, 282-1033. 581-0158 
Swope, Thomas, 303 Dayton Park, Dayton, 441-6286 
Tackett, Layne, 306 Spilman Apts., Pikeville, 437-6686, 432-2558 
Tapscott, Ozzie, 207-A Berger Rd., Paducah. 444-7533, 444-8696 
Tarlton. Thomas, 6608 Rustic Way, LouisvilUe, 969-5637, SP 

8-0350 
Tarvin, Roger W., 13 Woodland Ave., Ft. Thomas, HI 1-1232, 

CO 1-5265 
Taylor, Billy Joe, Route No. 1, Box 880, Pikeville, 7-4874 
Taylor, Bobby. 618 Main, Williamsburg, 6662, London, 864-4877 
Taylor, Clayton, Alva 

Taylor, Dennis H.. 1406 Hughes, Murray, 753-4825, 763-6512 
Taylor, Ed, 435 North 4st St., Louisville, 772-0126, 469-3400 
Taylor. Frank, 1617 Rosemount Rd., Portsmouth, Ohio, 363- 

7174. 353-5143 
Taylor. Jesse, Route No. 2, Box 341 Middlesboro 
Tegethoff, Kenneth, Route No. 1, Geneva, VA 7-5891 
Terhune, Calvin Truman, 2125 Talisman, Lexington, 277-8907, 

266-3135 
Thomas, Billy G., 2333 Quinn Dr., Louisville 16, 447-2815 



Thomas, Frank M., 629i,i South 44th St., Louisville, 774-2624, 

778-9167 
Thomas, James E., 402 Morgantown Road, Bowling Green, 

842-3659, 842-1646 
Thomason, Bennett, Box 92, Bardwell, 628-3150 
Thompson, Allen, Tilford 
Thompson. Houston, 513 East 20th St., Covington, 681-8594, 

261-4426 
Thompson. Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 452-9256 
Thompson, Kenneth Edward, 619 Salisbury Rd., Waverly, 

Ohio, 947-6409, 493-5136 
Thompson, Ralph, 649 Ivyhill, Cincinnati, Ohio, 261-3394 
Thompson, Thomas, A., 3435 Greentree Rd., Lexington, 266- 

8921 
Thompson, Tom. 519 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, 341-1809, 331- 

1661 
Thomson, Jerry, 335 Holmes Dr., Owensboro, 684-3302 
Tinsley, Marion F.. Box 447, Central City, 754-3608, 754-4870 
Todd, Lonnie H., Route No. 2, Madisonville, 821-5028. 821-6862 
Todd. Paul Russell, Flemingsburg. 846-2404, 845-6601 
Tompkins, Chester B., P. O. Box No. 6, Slaughters, 884-3221 
Torian, Virgil, Jr., 305 Brown St.. Hopkinsville 
Toy. Donny J., Route No. 1 Sharpsburg, 247-3211, 674-6381 
Travis, Tom A., 642 Price Ave., Madisonville, 821-1808, 821-6430 
Trimer, Norman E., 1927 Taffeta Dr., Valley Station, 937- 

6672, Ft. Knox 4-3332 
Triplett, Herb, Route No. 1, Mt. Sterling, 1484, 252-2250 ext. 

3492 
Trivette, Dale, Virgie, 639-2265, 639-4774 
Trout. Justin D., 3021 Moore St., Ashland 324-9500, 324-5511 

ext. 462 
Troutman. Doyle C, Box 304, Harlan. 573-1349, 673-1950 
Tuck. Ochell, 314 Hall, Glasgow, 651-3331, 3811 
Tucker, Gerald, 333y> Hopewell, Madisonville, 821-6380, 821- 

4460 
Tucker, Neal R., 1712 Clarence Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-5482, 

886-4463 
Tully, Pat, 361 Sharon Dr., Campbellsville, 465-8068, 465-8871 
Turner, Aaron, Smith Grove, 563-2041 (Bus.) 
Turner, Tommy, Route No. 3, Versailles, 873-5666 
Turner, Jimmy P., Box 4D1, Prestonsburg, 886-3696 
Tyre, Donald, 226 Rolling Acre, Frankfort, 223-3668, Lexing- 
ton, 254-6610 ext. 35 
Urlage, C. Richard, 822 Highlnad Ave., Ft. Thomas, 441-5613, 

471-8120 
Vaden, James M., 2125 Harrison, Paducah, 442-1575, 443-5339 
Vance, Hunter, Jr., 698 Woodland, Bowling Green, 2-3695 
Vanover, J. W., Jack Horn, 865-7730, 633-2168 
Vanover. Walter S., 1601 Mt. Auburn Rd., Evansville, Indiana, 

423-1974, 425-6211 
Vannerson, Duke, Route No. 2, Paducah, 442-1787, 444-9439 
Van Sickle, John R., Uniontown, 822-4774 
Van Zant, Jim, Box 602. Williamson, W. Va. 
VanZant, Russell, N.. Box 7. Edmonton, 432-3891 
Vaughan, Jerry Sam, 1606 East 9th St., Hopkinsville. 886-7473 
Vaughan, Ronald, Freeburn, 456-3464, 456-3370 
Vaughn, Teddy Ray 1905 East 19th, Bowling Green, 842-4687, 

843-8434 
Varble, William, 1705 Cypress St., Louisville, 775-6712, 772-3021 
Vermillion, C. D., 1402 Roosevelt Ave., Corbin, 528-2942 X 

Vescovi, Raymond B., 3525 Laurel Ave., Evansville, Ind., 423- 

8144, 963-3366 
Vettiner, Charlie, 301 Watterson Trail, Jeffersontown, 267- 

7416 (Bus.) 
Vice, Charles G., Virginia Ave., Mt. Sterling, 2507, Win- 
chester 744-3521 
Vincent, Johnny B.. Route No. 1, Box 114, Greenville, 338-4578 

Vincent, Johnny, Bee Springs, 597-2538 
Vineiguerra. Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 
Voorhis, Ken, 142 Woodmore Ave., Apt. No. 12, Louisville, 

363-2228 
Wagner, Marvin Rudy, Route No. 1, Box 446, Pikeville, 437- 

4611, 754-8184 
Waide, Harry D., 250 East Arch. Madisonville, 821-1998, 321- 

3870 
Walker, John O., Danville Ave., Box 56, Stanford, 365-7526, 

365-2191 
Walker, Myron C, 6501 Childs Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 662- 

0165, 421-4722 
Walker, Paul R., 625 Meadowlawn, Bowling Green, 843-8893, 

843-3249 
Wallace, Theodore J., 4710 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, 

441-3668, 381-6900 
Wallen, Howard, W., Williamsport, 789-3066. 789-5050 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington. 299-6123. 299- 

6123 
Walsh, Bernard N., Box 35, Warsaw, 567-5521, 567-5521 
Walters, Wayne, Straight Creek 
Ward, James Morris, Box 501, Richmond 
Ward, Ken, P. O. Box 102, Versailles. 873-5577, 873-3781 
Ward, Robert L., 2040 Washington, Henderson, 7-3805, 7-1724 
Ward. Sam. 618 1st St., Georgetown, 266J, 256-0480 
Warfield, James A., 4472 B Gaffey Heights, Ft. Knox, 942- 

3380, 4-3336 
Warrix, Lewis H., 300 Warrix Drive, Jackson, 666-6764, 666- 

2481 
Warner, Marvin, Nancy, 678-4844, 678-4942 
Way, James, 211 West Penn, Cynthiana, 234-2361, 234-4393 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



In Memoriam 




fi 




GENE CATHEY 

Gene Cathey, 33, one of Murray's most 
popular business men, died on October 15, 
1965. His death was attributed to pneumonia 
and complications. 

Mr. Cathey graduated from Murray 
Hig-h School in 1950. While in high school he 
played basketball and football, and he was 
active in other school activities. After at- 
tending Murray State College, he coached at 
the New Concord High School during the 
1953-55 period, was in the armed service in 
1956-57, returning to New Concord for the 
1958 and 1959 seasons. His teams won the 
county Championship each of the five sea- 
sons when he coached at New Concord. His 
1954 team_ won the Mayfield Invitational 
Tournament, and his teams were in regional 
tournaments two of his five coaching sea- 
sons. His teams won more than 85 percent 
of all the games they played. 

Mr. Cathey entered the insurance busi- 
ness in Murraj' after leaving the coaching 
profession. However, he retained his interest 
in sports. He was a registered K.H.S.A.A. 
basketball official for ten years, and he was 
currently registered as a football official at 
the time of his death. During the 1961- 
64 period he was an area football rep- 
resentative for the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association in its training program 
for football officials. He was willing to lend 
a hand in almost any venture which led 
young people into sports. He was director of 
the 'Tunt, Pass and Kick" contest, he had 
coached in the Murray Baseball Association, 
and had been president of that organization. 

Surviving Mr. Cathey are his wife, Mrs. 
Marilyn Walker Cathey ; his mother, Mrs. 
Bertie Cathey; one daughter, Mitzi Susan; 



and two sons, Monty and Mike. He was a 
member of the First Baptist Church of Mur- 
ray, P.H. 

FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

goal line into the end zone. The term "nearly at rest" 
is, we believe, not used in any rule or division of rule 
itself. The expression is, however, commonly used 
to describe specific situations. It is, for example, used 
in Play (2) on page 41 of the Rules Book. It is also 
used in the Case Book, in Situation 256D. It is a man- 
ner of indicating that, as described in the Rules Book, 
the "force is nearly spent." This is to say that if no 
than the crew of field officials can be dismissed 
roll, across the goal line into the end zone. (8-5-1). 

27. Comment: Are football game officials obligated 
to attend a pre-game conference? The pre-game 
conference has been found to be very beneficial on 
all levels, including interscholastic, intercollegiate and 
professional football. An increasing number of state 
associations, officials' chapters and conferences are 
adding the requirement of attending a pre-game con- 
ference to their standards. Where such conferences 
are mandatory, it is necessary that the referee report 
to the administrative body any official who does not 
attend. In many areas, the clock operator and chain 
crew members are also required to be there. Others 
than the crew of field officails can be dismissed 
should it be desirable to have a certain matter dis- 
cussed by the crew in private. 

It is customary that the conference be scheduled to 
start immediately after the crew is dressed for the 
game and approximately one hour before starting 
time. The referee is responsible for moderating and 
directing the conference. He will stress specific items 
and experience h.as indicated that most is accomplish- 
ed at the meeting if a prepared agenda is followed. 
The agenda generally includues such matters as keep- 
ing of records, physical aspects of the field, report 
of the check of bandages and equipment, duties of 
each official before and at the toss, mechanics of 
covering the kickoff, i-unning plays, fumbles, out-of- 
bounds, the administration of penalties, the marking 
of the point of furthest advance, and the administra- 
tion of disquaUfying penalties if there are such. Fre- 
quently, there is a brief discussion or review of un- 
usual plays which may have occurred in previous 
games in the area during the season. Athletic ad- 
ministrators are unanimous in their belief that suc- 
cessful football officiating now requires the pre-game 
conference. 

28. Comment: What is preventative officiating? 
Remembering at all times that every foul committed 
must be called, preventative officiating is the per- 
missible action of officials which will prevent some 
fouls from occurring. The good officials, by his action 
and words, can frequently prevent certain fouls from 
happening. As a traffic officer at a busv intersection 
keeps the traffic moving without actually arrests, so 
does a competent official keep the game moving, using 
every legitimate power at his command to prevent 
fouls from occurring. 

While there is general agreement that preventative 
officiating is desirable, there is difference of opinion 
as to "how far" it should go. Such matters as the 
referee discussing with the coaches before the game 
any unusual plays, particularly if the officials might 
be in the way, is always acceptable. The checking of 
equipment is required by rule and is, of itself, pre- 
ventative officiating. A foul may be frequently pre- 
vented by the official making certain not to start with 
more or less than eleven men on kick-offs and free- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



Page Seven 



kicks. In this situation, it is suggested that the of- 
ficial ask the captain to count his men, but that the 
official not teU him the number on the field. Cautioning 
the receiving team to be inside its restraining line for 
free-kicks, and aiding players of both teams in lining- 
up after a safety, are ordinarily accepted as desirable 
procedures for officials. These are preventative in 
nature. In many areas, preventative officiating in- 
cludes appropriate warnings by officials. For example, 
on a scrimmage-kick the umpire may warn, before 
the snap, about the use of hands. Officials can stop 
derogatory talk between players and thereby prevent a 
later foul. The captain should be notified that he can 
stop and prevent resulting future problems during the 
game if he directs his players to abstain from baiting 
and similar practices. 

During time - outs, the captains' attention should 
be called to the number of time-outs they have had 
and officials should make sure that the coaches know 
when they have used up their legal limits of time-outs. 
Officials should check each other regarding this 
matter during evei-y time-out. 

Blowing the whistle sharply contributes to a reduc- 
tion of fouls, and calling to the players saying "That's 
all", "That's enough", or, "Don't hit him" after the 
ball is dead either inbounds or out-of-bounds wUl fre- 
quently deter a player from making late contact and 
thereby fouUng. When a kick goes out-of-bounds, all 
officials can call to players to " Stand up, the ball is 
out-of-bounds." 

More controversal is the suggestion that the referee 
warn a player who is standing on the end line, pre- 
paring to kick. If the ball is snapped, this would be a 
foul. Also the official must, of course, be particularly 
careful about cautioning a player or suggesting that 
he move to a new position at a time when the ball 
may become alive and, as a result, catch the player 
moving when it is snapped. 

Thus, some areas of preventative officiating axe 
universally accepted. Regarding others, there are dif- 
ferences of opinion and perhaps controversy. It is 
suggested, however, that the practice of preventative 
officiating be studied and be expanded in those areas 
which will serve the best interest of the game. 



FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of 
the Universisty of Kentucky College of Education. The 
Code letters "e,j,s,c,a" refer to elementary, junior high, 
senior high, college and adult audiences who may enjoy 
the particular film listed. The rental prices shown 
do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscription service plans offered by the Bureau of 
Audio-Visual Material. 

Basketball 
ASHLAND VS. ST. XAVIER (1962 K.H.S. BASKET- 
BALL TOURNAMENT FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
Silent, $1.00 

The Ashland Tomcats gave a valiant performance 
in trying to capture their second consecutive cham- 
pionship but the Tigers of St. Xavier were the win- 
ners in the final game by 62-58. The Tigers were led 
by Mike Silliman and the Tomcats by Larry Conley. 
BALL HANDLING IN BASBETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 
$1.50 

Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment, before shoot- 
ing, catching the ball, and other points. Presents game 
shots, using special photographic techniques to illustrate 
principles. 

BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 
Animated play diagrams, slow motion photography, 



and action shot are combined in this new film pre- 
pared under the personal direction of Mr. Rupp 
especially for coaching use. Among the driUs and plays 
covered in this film are: pivot man's slide into the 
basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky Basket 
Maker; legal screening; penetration zone defense; and 
the Kentucky fast break. 
BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Tills is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Official 
Sports Film Service imder the sanction of the National 
Fedei-ation. A fantastic dream sequence where im- 
possible and nightmarish situations can and do arise is 
the continuity thread used throughout the film to de- 
pict: Accepted officiating procedures — problems created 
by double fouls and false double fouls— tricky situations 
connected with front and back court — jump baU infrac- 
tions and procedures — little understood distinction be- 
tween player and team control — and a panorama of 
basic rule fundamentals. 
BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 

TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a. 11/2 reels, $2.50 

Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, used his team to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of basketball. Slow motion photography is used to 
break the various court techniques down into easily 
grasped essentials. 
BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

$2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 

This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 
BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 

reel, $1.50 . 

The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, roUs, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
fihn. 
BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 

1 reel, $1.50 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stopping, 
turning) passing (finger control, movement with the 
pass, leading the receiver, choice of the right pass), 
catcidng (side pass, high pass), shootting (finger con- 
trol, arm extension, wrist fiip, choice of the right 
shot), dribbling, faking, and pivoting are demonstrated 
and explained in this film. 

BASKETBALL FOR GIRLS: FUNDAMENTAL TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.) $1.50 

Fast action, slow-motion photography, and skOlful 
players combine to show fundamental techniques of 
ball handling, passing and shooting. 
BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY VS. COVINGTON HOLY 

CROSS (1965 Basketball Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 

(40 min.), color, silent, $1.00 

The Breckinridge County High School team which 
reached the finals in 1964, returned to take the state 
championship title in 1965. Led by Butch Beard, they 
defeated Covington Holy Cross 95-73. 
CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL — TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 

Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means best 
used under varying conditions. 
DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 

1 reel, $1.50 

Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic sldUs are illus- 
trated, using special photography to demonstrate points. 
Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm action are 
taught also. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



The Flying Dutchman 

Stanley Arnzen and Bob Miller packed 
327 basketball officials, coaches, timers and 
scorers into that Newport Gymnasium for 
this year's attendance record at the basket- 
ball rules clinic. This was one more than 
Claude Ricketts gathered together in Louis- 
ville for second place honors. 

Bob, Stan and Edgar McNabb explained 
this huge attendance by pointing to the 
large numbers of Ohio officials crossing the 
river from Cincinnati and towns to the 
north and to the wonderful fellowship which 
always prevails at this clinic. Nick Poppas 
came all the way from Dayton to be there. 

Northern Kentucky has a chap who has 
spent a couple of decades coaching at 
Holmes High. This chap draws crowds by 
himself wherever he goes. His players call 
him "Coach." His friends have many names 
for him but reference here is to Tom Ellis 
who is a sports legend in his own time. Tom 
is definitely one of the reasons for the large 
Newport turn-out each year. This fellow 
won't let any session he attends become dull. 
Back in 1928 when Tom captained the first 
state championship football team Western 
Kentucky State College ever produced, he 
was a powerful linesman and even then his 
colorful personality kept everybody on the 
team alert. You should have seen this "dyna- 
mo" run a baseball team from his catcher's 
box and hit a fast ball. He was a sucker for 
a curve. In those days Tom, or "Big Daddy" 
and "Lardy", as we used to call him, was 
the best basketball official in western Ken- 
tucky. This is the man the Dutchman salutes 
this month for a lifetime of service to boys 
— and 'he made men out of hundreds of 
them. This qualifies him for the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor. You're a great guy, Tom! 

Memorandum to Commissioner Ted San- 
ford! Tear up all individual attendance 
records at the basketball clinics. Beech- 
mont's Jerry Kimmel and Morehead's Bobby 
Laughlin have had their records broken by 
Adolph Rupp's new assistant coach, Joe Hall. 
Joe was on hand for roll call at fourteen of 
the fifteen clinics, missing only the one at 
Newport, and had he come "Big Tom" would 
have had to squeeze Jarvis Parsley a little 
closer to the exit to make room for him. The 
University of Kentucky has racked up a 
score in signing Joe Hall. This young man 
made friends by the minute with his effer- 
vescent personality. A former student of 
John Bunn, he is a credit to that nationally- 
acclaimed gentlemen who is the editor of 
the basketball rule book. Coach Bob Wright 
of Morehead State College and Bobby 




Joe Hall 



W. B. Jones 



Laughlin were even with Joe in eastern Ken- 
tucky with their attendance of eight ses- 
sions. 

There's a cheese factory in Hart Coun- 
ty near Caverna, where Ralph Dorsey now 
coaches, and close to Hart Memorial High, 
where the Dutchman hung up a never- 
equaled coaching record of 3 games won and 
23 lost in 1931. Ralph and Joe Billy Mans- 
field now assistant commissioner, played for 
W. B. Owen's Horse Cave team that year, 
which tacked on two of those losses. As a 
peace offering Ralph Dorsey presented the 
Dutchman a two pound hunk of that cheese 
in Elizabethtown. Now if Joe Billy will send 
some medication to offset an over consump- 
tion of Hart County cheese, these gentlemen 
will be forgiven for what they did in 1931. 

V. A. Jackson, one of the best officials 
ever to blow a whistle in the early forties, 
showed up at Lexington. He's Dr. Jackson 
now. Old basketball officials don't fade 
away; they become M. D.'s. They won't get 
rich in that field but it's a peaceful way to 
spend the intervening years after a fortune 
has been accumulated officiating. 

They've named a new auditorium in a 
Somerset School in honor of W. B. Jones. 
For thitry years this outstanding educator 
has given service far beyond the call of duty 
to the citizens of the "Briar Jumper" coun- 
try, and the honor is truly deserved. W. B. 
served as a member of the K. H. S. A. A. 
Board of Control and served well. May your 
tribe increase, W. B. Jones! An Abou Ben 
Adhem citation is on its way to hang in the 
W. B. Jones Auditorium. 

Incidentally, the best hot roll bakers in 
the world are Mrs. Beulah Stevens and Mrs. 
Jesse Keith, a couple of Somerset girls. They 
served them up at the honor dinner the 
Dutchman attended for W. B. Jones, and 
this gourmet was out-eaten only by Bill 
Clark and Coach Jim Williams. 

Word has come that Coach Jack Fultz 
of Olive Hill is studying recreation at More- 
head College. Dr. Zadia Harold, one of the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



Page Nine 



best informed recreation professors in the 
business, is Morehead's recreation depart- 
ment head. When Zadia puts his stamp of 
approval on a student he's ready to run any- 
body's recreation program. Get Zadia's 
brand on you, Jack, and you'll have park and 
recreation job offers snowing you under. Dr. 
Zadia wrote some basketball history as a 
high school star in western Kentucky a few 
years back. 

Making the nineteen hundred mile clinic 
tour of Kentucky this fall revealed changes 
since our first sashay over the state in 1942. 

Women are attending the clinics in in- 
creasing numbers. They are scorers, timers, 
and some want to officiate. 

Mountain roads were muddy messes 
twenty-four years ago; now they are so 
smooth that my 1957 "Tiger" couldn't feel 
a bump. 

Modern schools with fine gymnasiums 
are springing up everywhere. That new 
Ohio County High School is a thing of 
beauty and a far cry from the old gym in 
Hartford where the first one was held. One 
thing was the same at this clinic — Elvis Hall 
was present at the 1942 Hartford Clinic and 
Elvis was on hand in 1965. Elvis and "Big 
Mac," Lawrence McGinnis, are like "Old 
Faithful," only nobody has ever seen Law- 
rence erupt. They do see him at the Owens- 
boro Clinic annually. 

Another thing changed in Elizabeth- 
town. Fifteen minutes after Howard Gard- 
ner, Bo Bo Davenport, Joe Hall and the 
Dutchman had dinner in the Cardinal Inn, 
the place burned down. 

Send your nominations for Game Guy 
and Corn Cob Pipe awards to: The Flying 
Dutchman, Box 36, Jeffersontown, Ky. 



KAPOS NEWS 

K.A.P.O.S. SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT NAMED 

MISS PAULA GAYLE DAVIS, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul M. Davis, has been given the 1965 $500 
Educational Scholarship awarded by the Kentucky 
Association of Pep Organization Sponsors. Paula Mves 
on RR# 2, Horse Cave, Kentucky and is a graduate of 
Memorial Consolidated School. Paula ranked number 
one in a class of fifty-five and was valedictorian of the 
class. She was named the Betty Crocker Homemaker 
of the Year and received her state FHA degree. 
Besides being a cheerleader for four years she 
was a member of the following: Beta Qub, 
Forensic Society, Music Club and the FTA. In 
1964 she was the Runner-Up for the Faxm 
Bureau Queen and Third Runner-Up in the 1965 Foot- 
ball Contest. Miss Davis plans to major in English at 
the Kentucky Southern College in Louisville. K.A.P.O.S. 
is proud of its two scholarship recipients; Betty Beams 
in 1964 and Paula Davis in 1965 




Paula Gayle Davis 

WHERE DOES THE SCHOLARSHIP MONEY 
COME FROM? 

Part of it comes from the school. So Principals 
and Coaches who haven't enrolled their school sind 
sponsor with K.A.P.O.S., do send your membership 
check for $2.00 to Mrs. Stella S. Gilb at the University 
of Kentucky. Make check payable to K.A.P.O.S. How- 
ever, the major portion of the scholarship fund is 
earned by dedicated sponsors, your sponsor, your spon- 
sor, and your sponsor. On October 15 some 44 sponsors 
brought 300 cheerleaders to a clinic at Bowling Green 
High School and K.A.P.O.S. realized over $100 from 
this clinic. 

WHAT DID THE CHEERLEADERS TAKE AWAY 
FROM THE CLINIC? 

Besides learning four new cheers, they had the 
opportunity to demonstrate one of their own cheers 
and have it evaluated by the clinic teacher, Mr. Merle 
Tyler. Mr. Tyler lectured on: sportsmanship, behavior, 
good grooming, crowd psychology, and pep rallies. 

WHAT DID THE SPONSORS TAKE AWAY FROM 
THE CLINIC? 

They learned about the objectives and purposes 
of K.A.P.O.S. They were informed about the scholar- 
ship fund and encouraged to join the association. They 
shared ideas on tlie following: approved methods 
of selecting cheerleaders, where to purchase 
cheerleader outfits and ways to make money to 
pay for them, homecoming programs, ways in 
Which pep clubs earn money and how they 
spend their earnings, and last but probably the most 
pertinent of all was the pressing problem of how to get 
administrators to recognize in a monetary way the 
sponsor who spends as much as ten to fifteen hours per 
week in after-sChool hours, working with and chaperon- 
ing cheerleaders. 

Mrs. Stella S. Gilb reported that she is doing some 
research on the paying of sponsors for extra-curricular 
duties. She expects to publish the data soon. On Octo- 
ber 9 she conducted a workshop for over 200 sponsors 
on the niinois State University campus, and 807° of 
those in attendance signified liiat they were paid for 
the time they spent coaching cheerleaders, with sala- 
ries ranging from $300 to $500. 

K.A.P.O.S. wishes to thank Mrs. Janet Moore of 
Bowling Green High for the many hours she spent in 
organizing this first successful clinic to be held in 
the western part of the state. Present to help her were: 
Mrs. Julie Tesar of Ft. Knox High, President; Mrs. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



Rosemary Weddington, Franklin County High, Past 
President; Mrs. George Spurlock, Madison High, Past 
President; Mrs. Gloria K. Compton, Bryan Station Sr., 
Bd. Member; Mrs. Sharon Tippett, Woodford Co. High, 
Bd. Member; Miss Linda Spaulding, Bardstown High, 
Bd. Member; Mrs. SteUa S. Gilb, Un. of Ky., Sec. and 
Treasurer. 

PRINCIPALS and COACHES, support and appreci- 
ate your cheerleader sponsor. Behind every good 
cheering squad there must be a dedicated sponsor. 
Thanks for letting me share the K.A.P.O.S. news with 
you. 

— SteUa S. Gilb 



FILMS 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

MONTICELLO VS. FLAGET (1960 K.H.S.A.A. STATE 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS) e-j^-c-a, 

2 reels, color, silent, $1.00 

Flaget High School of Louisville defeated MonticeUo 
High School in the final game of the tournament to 
win the championship. The Braves came from behind 
in the last half to overtage the Trojans and win by 
a score of 65-56. 

NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL (1959) 
K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, 
e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $1.00 

The Indians of North Marshall High School proved 
too much for the Reds of duPont Manual in the final 
game, winning by a score of 64-63. All-State players, 
Doyle and Lampley, were best for the winners, while 
Melear and Siers led the Reds. 

OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (40 min.), 
color, $1.00 

Demonstrates the official rules interpretations cover- 
ing screening, traveling, jump ball, front and back 
court, throw-ins, free throws, personal and technical 
fouls, rebounding, and unusual and often misunderstood 
play situations. 

RUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMPION- 
SHIP OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $3.50 
This film presents the highlights of all the games, 
both regular season and tournament games, which 
led up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the NCAA 
basketball crown. 

SENECA VS. BRECXINRIDGE COUNTY (1964 Basket- 
ball Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels (40 min.), color, silent, 
$1.00 

Seneca High School won the state championship for 
the second straight year by defeating Breckinridge 
County by the score of 66-56. 

SENECA VS. LEXINGTON DUNBAR (1963 BASKET- 
BALL FINALS, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, color, $1.00 
The Seneca Indians defeated the Lexington Dunbar 
Bearcats by the score of 72-66 to win the forty^sixth 
annual state championship. Redd and Unseld led 
Seneca while Wilson and Smith were best for Dunbair 
SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures the 
action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and finger- 
tip control. Special attention is given total body co- 
ordination, especially inward rotation of the hand and 
arm making the throw. 

ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO. (1958) K. H. S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT PTNALS, e-j-s-c-a, 

3 reels, $1.00 

St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, in the fina' game of the 
tournament at the University of Kentucky Coliseum. 
THIS IS BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels (33 min.), 

Color, $1.00 



Interpretation of play situations goes beyond the letter 
of the rule and gives guide Unes to better under- 
standing of blocking, charging, baskets interference, 
goal tending, screening, and play violations of the free 
throw, jump and boundary lines. 

Swimming 

BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Through scenes photographed both above and 
beneath the surface of the water, basic techniques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land and 
water drills invohnng kicking, breathing, floating, 
paddling and stroking and pulling with the arm prac- 
ticed separately, then coordinated as the swimmer 
learns the American crawl. The back float, back 
stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated and 
explained. 

BREAST STROKE, SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, $1.50 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 
CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented 
in this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the 
breathing are demonstrated. This film also includes 
slow motion shots under water. 
DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Ater a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: 
the hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, 
proper arm action, correct way of landing on the feet, 
proper takeoff and lift, correct entry into the water. 
The backward dive is also taught, including lift, arch- 
ing the body, and entry into the water. The motion is 
stopped at various points to enable detailed study of 
form. 
DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera and 
carefully devised teaching demonstrations introduce 
the new swimming technique known as the dolphin or 
fishtail kick. Analyzing the body movements used in 
the dolphin kick, the film stresses the importance of 
practice for mastery of this efficient speedy kick. 
I'M NO FOOL IN WATER, p-e-j-a, 1 reel (8 min.) 
color, $3.00 

Jiminy Cricket illustrates the "do's" and "don'ts" 
of water safety precautions. Points out the basic rules: 
wait at least two hours after eating, stay out when 
water is too cold, never swim alone, and dive only 
when you know the water is deep enough. 
SWIM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

Men of the Army Air Force at Miami are taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burning 
oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruction and 
for safety classes as well as for general programs. 

Track 

THE BROAD JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed-timing and coordination — develop- 
ment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and hips, 
one, two, three style — footroU — single and triple air 
stride — soft versus hard take off — arm position. 
DISCUS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle development 
for side arm throw — grips — finger roll — ^heel of thumb 
pressure — finger exercise — clockwise spin — hip snap — 
reverse and non-reverse styles. 
DISTANCE RACES, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeple chase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is contrast- 
ed with that of dash man. Difference in typical physics 
are shown. Slow motion photography is used to analyze 
movements. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



Page Eleven 



DISTANCES, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style— developing stamina— calisthenics— avoiding 
shin splint— controlled tension— forward knee reflex- 
straight line running— automatic stride. 
THE HIGH JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

BeUy roll or straddle and improved Western style 
—body lean and reverse— approach— body tension— co- 
ordination of arm and leg action. 
THE HURDLES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles— rear 'hip and leg action— 
rythmic running— huurdling, calisthenics— body balance 
—correct clearanc^circular stepover action— adapting 
styles of physiques. 
THE JAVELIN, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw— preliminary run- 
concluding stride— throwing stance — throwing and re- 
verse—alternative hand and finger grips- facing posi- 
tion—balance of stomach and back muscle tension — 
throwing angle — body and leg coordination drills- 
flexibility exercises. 
JUMPS AND POLE VAULT, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are shown 
for running high-jump; running broad-jump; hop, step 
and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion photography is 
used for detailed study of form. 
MIDDLE DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques— ball of foot running— auto- 
matic stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise — 
counter balanced arm action— push drive— jockeying 
for position. 
POLE VAULT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises 
— running action — grip — selecting the pole — ^take-off — 
Western and Eastern style— slotting — novice training. 
THE RELAYS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel. $1.50 

Passing— visual pass — blind pass — right and left ex- 
change — emerging of runners' speed — baton grips — relay 
starts, underhand action — cup style — overhead sprint 
pass — fly scoop — practice and team work. 
THE SPRINTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 20O yard dash-impact 
style and natural stretch stride-synchronizing leg and 
arm action-conditioning exercises-starting techniques- 
slow motion of muscular utilization and coordination. 
SHOT PUT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel. $1.50 

Fitting styles to physiques — tension control — one, 
two, three rhythm — exercises — finger and hand grip — 
finger and wrist snap — ^foot positions — progressive ten- 
sion and effort — explosive hip snap. 
THIS IS TRACK AND FIELD, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

Uses the Olympic motto "Citius-Altius-Fortius," 
"Swifter-Higher-Stronger" to introduce a variety of 
track and field situations. Helps officials, coaches, par- 
ticipants and fans to better understand the basic rules 
of running, jumping vaulting and throwing. 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Five) 

Weathers, Charles, Jr., 3620 Grand, Louisville, 776-B026 
Watts, Paul A., Route No. 1, Crestwood, 241-4906. 895-2431 
Wearren, Wade H., 4622 Fox Run Rd., Louisville, 895-8959, 

246-0362 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, Box 354, Williamson, W. Va. 
Weaver, Bay, 3117 Bemrad, Pius Heights, 341-2610, DU 1-0890 
Welch, John H., Box 233. Mayking. 633-2928. 855-4121 
Wells, Glenn, 515 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, 341-0481, 872-5742 
Weiner, Dick, No. 8 Poplar Ridge Rd., Alexandria, 635-5083, 

821-4280 ext. 327 
Welch, Bill, 1324 Beech, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8090, 921-9722 



Welch, Donald G., Route No. 2, Worthville, 732-5575 

Court, Lexington, 255-6635, 

West, John, Route No. 1, Hickman, 236-3295, 326-2521 
Wetzel, Don, 2231 Griffith Ave., Owensboro, 683-4025, 684-9419 
Weyer, James G., 42 Scenic View Dr., Fort Thomas, 781-2220, 

261-6400 
Whalen, William C, Route No. 1, Maysville, 564-3942, 564-3461 
Wheeler. Donald Wayne, 213 Virginia, Bowling Green, 842- 

7807, 843-3031 
Wheeler, Joe, Box 8, Ferguson 

Wheeler, Resvie, Route No. 3, West Liberty, 522-4496, 743-3705 
White. Carl W., Box 83X, Route No. 3, Central City, 754-4975, 

476-2424 
White, Billy Dean, 3rd & Main, Hutton Apts., Corbni, 528- 

4839, 528-2415 
White, David B., 237 Longview Dr., Bowling Green, 843-3884, 

843-4331 
White, Mendel J., 345 West 7th St., Russellville, 726-9416, 726- 

6533 
White, Nelson H., P. O. Box 42, Stanton, 663-2564 
Whitledge, James C, P. O. Box 125, Clay, 664-2313, 664-2313 
Whitley, James E., 208 Cranewood Dr., Trenton, Ohio, 988-6740 
Whitt, John W., 158 Robin Ed., Eussell ,836-3575 
Whittemore, Paul F., 2 TES 374, USMA, West Point, N. Y., 

3360, 3809-3227 
Wickham, James Robert, 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 

348-6282, 833-4612 
Wigginton, A. M., Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, 776-7881 
Will. Chuck, 2220 Brent Drive, Madisonville, 821-2652, 821-2125 
Wiles, Eddie, Box 732, Owensboro, CO 4-6213 
Willett, Art, 114 Madison, Bardstown, 348-5515, 348-9019 
Willhite, James S., Jr., 507 Hill St., Georgetown, 661, 635 
Williams, Bobby, 220 Stratford Ave., Richmond, 623-3894, 623- 

4959 
Williams, Donald, 301 Elm St., Ravenna, 723-4341, 723-2515 
Williams, Jack, P. O. Box 61, Hebron, 689-7680 
Williams, Jack A., 1539 MacArthur Dr., Evansville, Ind.t 

476-8876, 424-4201 
Williams. James H., Elmwood Dr., South Shore, 932-4372, 

932-3055 
Williams, Paul W., Hager Hill, 789-4503, 297-3674 
Williams, Roger, 404 Bond St., Richmond 623-3126 
Williams, Smythe, Jack, 323 Steele, Frankfort. CA 3-5078, 

CA 3-0565 
Williams Tex M., 107 E. Sixth Ave., South Charleston, W. Va. 
Williams, Willie H., 413 Elm St., Lexington, 262-4201, 252-3212 
Williamson, Fred, 209 Rucker Ave., Gerogetwon, 2360, 164 
Willis, Robert A., 234 South 25th St., Louisville, 778-6526, 

687-8864 
Wilson, H. G., 205 North Maple, Somerset, 679-1290, 679-1544 
Winchester, Boy L., Bethlehem, 878-4102, New Castle, 346-8421 
Winfrey, Shelby, 316 Sharon Dr., Campbellsville, 465-8392, 

465-8392 
Wingfield, Felix G., 1132 Eastern Parkway, Louisville, ME 6- 

2282, ME 6-2282 
Wise, Billy V., 240 St. Ann Dr., Lexington. 266-7449, 262-5492 
Wise, Jack, 208 Pocahontas, Georgetown, 2052, 120 
Wirtz. Howard A., 6510 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

522-1818, 751-3454 
Wirtz, Leonard F., 8732 Balboa Dr., Mt. Healthy, 931-1468, 

622-7960 
Withrow, Raymond, 424 Reservoir Ave., Central City, 754-1506 
Withrow, Boy D.. Route No. 1, Glasgow, 678-2367, 427-2611 
Wolfe, Paul A., 502 Broad, Falmouth, 654-6341, 441-9993 
Wolfe, Roger, 308 N. Mill, London, 864-4207 
Wood, Ellsworth. Brooksville, 736-5438 
Wood, James Randall, 712 Maple Ave., Falmouth, 654-4461, 

581-7700 
Woods, Gene B., Boute No. 2, Kirksey, 489-2595, 395-4181 
Woodward, Bill. 1716 West 12th St., Owensboro, MU 4-2269, 

MU 4-7017 
Woosley, Travis, Box 624, Calvert City, 395-4667, 395-4135 
Wooten, George B., Nebo, 249-3227, 667-2411 
Woprice, Bonald J., 10706 Milwaukee, Valley Station, 937- 

7998, 634-1361 
Wray, Kenneth E., 331 Aylesford Place, Lexington, 255-8057 
Wray, Bobert, 29 Belle Monte, So. Ft. Mitchell, 331-2594, 341- 

4579 
Wright, Billy J., Salt Lick, 683-2911 
Wright, H. W., Jr., 714 Cedar Grove Court, Louisville, SP 4- 

5173, JU 7-1161 ext. 433 
Wright, James Lloyd, 121 Showalter, Georgetown, 2344 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 East 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-0526, 381- 

Yanoff, Jay M.. 3702 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, GL 8-7674 
Yates, Virgil, Dogwood Lane, Fulton, 472-3809, 838-6223 
Yelton, Gene B,. Brooksville, 735-3922, 735-3656 
Young, Edward Maurice, 1605 Dantzler Court, Lexington, 278- 

2820 
Zlamal, Baymond K., P. O. Box 235, Lynch 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1965 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Dr. Lexington, Ky. 

In Stock For Immediate Delivery 

by U. P. S. 

All Star Cotton Sweat Socks— Sized 10, 11, 12, 13 $4.50 doz. 

Speedo Swim Suits — Boys & Girls 

RSS, sec, & Jet Basketballs, Converse Shoes __Call us for quantity prices 

Blazers-Adults (Kids Available) $19.95 ea. 

Trophies in stock at all prices — We engrave at our store 
Sweat Shirts — We print our own at store, 

3-4 week service — 36 minimum $1.95 ea. 

Coat Style Sweaters $12.95 & $13.95 ea. 

V-Neck White Sweaters $8.25 & Up 

6" Chenille Letters — (Plain) 2 weeks $1.35 ea. 

J & J Speed Pack Tape $17.95 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 277-3977 Dick Wallace 



WE ASKED OUR FANS present gets a bad impression of the com- 
munity you represent. 
Why "boo?" Somebody has said "A ^j^ ^.^-^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ .^. 

boo IS a reverberation of air through the j^^^^, j^ ^^^ j . ^. .^ ^ 

empty spaces of the cranium." ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^J^^ 

Why criticize your coach if the team why give excuses and alibis when your 

loses? Isn't he the same fine coach that led team loses? The really big man takes defeat 

the team through the district and regional without a whimper. 

tournaments? . , ,. • .,. , 

Why am t you reiereemg it you are such 

Why ridicule players on the opposing a rules expert? 
team? Would you like opposing fans to ridi- -TSSAA News (Tennessee) 

cule yours? 

Why cheer when an opposing player ^NE OF THE FINEST JOBS 

fouls out? Are you glad to see a player suf- (Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

fer misfortune ? In conclusion, I believe a coach becomes a coach 

tin ^ j_ 1 1 1 • 1 1 when he disciplines his own players without the 

Why gloat and act so overbearingly when thought of winning, when you start coaching and quit 

your team wins ? They may lose the next worrying about what people say or think about you, 

game. when you stop officiating and let officials do their job. 
^,., J . . 1 J.1 Ehnotionalism, anxiety and fear invariably will 

Why desert your team when they are hinder objective thought and action — especially when 

behind ? That's when they need you the a decision under pressure must be made. Be a coach. 

jYjQgt. Make that decision now! 

— Supt. Ray Hamann (Kimberly) 
Why act in such a way that everyone in Wisconsin Coaches .\ssoc. Quarterly 



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SWEATERS IN STOCK 

No. CBC heavy weight worsted cotton back coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $8.95 
No. BSC 100% heavy weight pure worsted, 3 ply, coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet. 
Sizes : 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $12.45 
No. MBC medium weight pure worsted, 2 ply coat sweater. This is a Kiddie 
style and is just the thing for your mascot, or child. 
Colors: Scarlet, royal and white 
Sizes : 6, 8, 10 and 12. 

School Price: $6.45 
No. MBRB V-neck, medium heavy weight worsted pull-over for cheerleaders. 
Colors: White, black, kelly, Lt. gold. Old gold, royal, scarlet, 
Columbia Blue. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $8.45 
No. HIV heavy weight cheerleaders sweaters. 

Colors: White, kelly, scarlet, black, light gold. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $11.95 



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No. TS9 jacket of 24 oz. wool with iridescent lining: contrasting color leather 

armhole inserts ; leather pocket trim ; knit trim. 

Colors: scarlet with white; royal with white. 

Sizes: Boys and Girls 30 thru 48. 

School Price: $15.00 
No. 302S jacket, 24 oz. wool reversed to satin; raglan sleeve style; iridescent 

lining; worsted mixed knit trim. 

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CLASS AAA STATE CHAMPION SENECA 




Seated in Front: Mgr. Randy Simelson, Rick Geoghegan. (Left to Rigiit) Front Row: George 
Calbert, Jim Dnrbin, Ed Bolds, Mike Lewis, Bob Martin, Hiroshio Sherrill, John Habeck, John Ivy. 
Garnett Schott, Charlie Petry, Joe Ruttle, Hilton Humphrey, Scott Horan, Ron Garrison, Pete Dawkins, 
Dean Williams. Second Row: Dwight Allen, Carey Eaves, Bob Staebler, Rick Stone, Ron Jackson, 
Don Morris George Dawson. Henry Grady, Mike Zeitman. Andrew Hays, Mike Harris, Phil Chance, John 
Tarter, Tom Robinson. Third Row: Pete Eiche, Ed Eiche, David Sharp, Charlie Williams, Mike Weldon, 
Ronnie Rogers, John Marcum, Larry Trunnell, Phil Thompson, Greg Karem, Bob Wixon , Bob Jackson. 
George Crutcher, Del Jaggers. 



Seneca 54 — Southern 






Seneca 


6 — Waggener 26 


Seneca 45 — Westport 7 






Seneca 


27 — Eastern 7 


Seneca 33 — Butler 13 






Seneca 


45 — Durrett 6 


Seneca 35 — Fairdalc 






Seneca 
Seneca 


7 — Thomas Jeffe 
16 — Fern Creek 6 






Playoffs 




Sene 


a 35 - 


- Valley 







Sene 


a 13 - 


- Flaget 


12 





Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

December, 1965 



THE TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 




(Left to Rieht) Front Ro 
Ken Combs, Jerry Price. ] 



Dennis Pohl, Glen Dattilo. Don Kelty, 
I Eilers, Gene Kelty, Jim Richardson. 



David Daring. Second Row: Coacli 



The 1965 Cross Country 

The Trinitj High School ol Louisville won the 
thiiteenth K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, which was 
held at Bellamiine College, Louisville, on November 
6. The team score was 52, with five Trinity runners 
placing in the top 16. The individual winner was Daryle 
Remole of Owensboro High School who had the time 
of 9:53.4. This was a State Meet record. Skip Rankin 
of Somerset was second with the time of 10:10.7, and 
Bob Weis of St. Xavier was third with 10:15.2. Ath. 
Dii. Eddie Weber of Bellamiine was meet manager. 

Scores of the first ten teams were as follows: 
Trinity, 52; Bishop David, 131; Somerset, 194; St. 
Xawer 194; DeSales 246; Taylor County 268; Owens- 
bom, 280; Bourbon County, 292; Covington Catholic, 
361; Flat Gap, 376. 

Ten regional runs had been held for the purpose 
of quaUfying teams and individuals for the state event. 
These runs were held at Paducah, Bowling Green, 
Bardstown, Clarkson, Louisville, Jefferson County. 
Fort ThoniHs, Lexington, Whitley City and Paintsville. 
In addition to the teams, several individual runners 
qualified as entrants for the state affair. 

The order in which the first fifty runners finished 
is given below, including the times of the first twenty. 

1 — Darylf Remole, Owensboro (9:53.4); 2 — Skip 
Rank-in. Somerset (.10:10.71; 3 — Boh Weis, St Xaviei 



(10:15.21; Steve Keller, Lexington Catholic (10:19.1; 
5— Kenny Eilers, Trinity (10:21»; 6 — James Rucker. 
Holmes (10:23); 7— Allen Shouse, Daviess County (10:- 
24); 8— Jerry Price, Trinity (10:26); 9— Denny Pohl, 
Trinity (10:28); 10 — David Baumer, Durrett (10:30); 
11 — James Dinwiddle, Leitchfield (10:32); 12 — Ken 
Blandford, DeSales (10:34); 13— James Banks, M. M. 
I. (10:36); 14— David Daring, Trinity (10:37); 15— Tom 
Wilhams, Bishop David (10:39); 16— Don Kelty, Trini- 
ty (10:41); 17— Jim Weber, Bishop David (10:42); 18— 
Don Weber, Bishop David (10:43); 19— Woody White, 
Bourbon County (10:44); 20— Dan Goff, Bishop David 
(10:451; 21— Phil Theis, Westport; 22— Gordon Loomis, 
Holmes; 23— Kenny Moore, Somerset; 24— Tony Auton, 
ton, Simon Kenton; 25 — Bill Nevitt, St. Xavier; 26— 
Joseph Taylor, Taylor County; 27 — Ronnie Garrett. 
Somerset; 28— Jim Hahn, Manual; 29— James Daugh- 
erty, McCreary County; 30— Danny WeUs, Southern; 
31— Jim Zorn, St. Xavier; 32— Russell Moorman, Ow- 
ensboro; 33— Joe Shane, North Marshall; 34 — Brent 
Gregory, Paducah Tilghman; 35 — Bob Poole, Bourbon 
County; 36— David Kendall, Shelby County; 37— Bert 
Fields, Jenkins; 38 — Bob Rodgers, Taylor County; 39 — 
Mike VanHuss, Holmes; 40 — Ken Richeson, Western; 
41— Don Hilpp, Westpoprt; 42— Ronald Blevins, Flat 
Gap; 43 — Jesse Amick, Atherton; 44 — Robert KidweU; 
Lafayette; 45 — Pat Finegan, Flaget; 46 — Mel Irvin, 
DeSales; 47 — Don Luken, Covington Catholic; 48 — 
Mike Allen, St. Xavier; 49 — Jed Johnston, Grayso]i 
County Cathohc; 50— James Harper, Pulaski County. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII— NO 5 



DECEMBER, 1965 



$1.00 Per Year 



Lifetime Sports Foundation 

Washington, D.C. 
July 29, 1965 
Dear Mr. Sanford: 

It was my pleasure to speak at your 
national meeting last month. After my talk, 
several of your associates asked for a copy 
of it, and suggested I send a copy to each of 
you. Since I spoke from an outline, I do not 
have a copy of the speech. I am enclosing a 
brief resume of my remarks. 

This may seem presumptuous of me, 
but, as I said in the talk, I feel strongly that 
you and the high school coaches you admin- 
ister probably can do more than any other 
group in furthering physical fitness and in- 
creasing individual sports participation in 
our schools. 

You and your high school coaches are 
asked to speak before key groups, and thus 
are in a position to influence the right peo- 
ple. By advocating the strengthening of 
physical education programs, and by urging 
that all students be given the opportunity 
to learn the skills of a sport that can be 
played and enjoyed throughout life, these 
coaches can contribute significantly to the 
enrichment of the lives of all our girls and 
boys. Those of us who believe in competition 
should advocate, logically, competition for 
all. 

I hope you share my concern and my 
belief that this is a genuine national need. 
I hope also that you will ask your coaches 
to make this aopeal in their talks in the 
months ahead. If I can assist you in this, 
please let me know. 

With best regards. 
Sincerelv, 
Bud Wilkinson 

Charles B. Wilkinson, President 
Resume of Bud Wilkinson's Sp€ech 

It is a pleasure to have an opportunity 
to speak to the delegates to the annual 
meeting of the Hierh School Federation. 
I am grateful for the opportunity 
to discuss with you the Lifetime Sports 
Foundation. I will trv to make clear the 
following points: 1) The need for the Foun- 
dation, 2) Objectives and purposes. 3) How 
the Foundation will function, 4) What you 



can do to assist. 

At the outset I should make it perfectly 
clear that I am a strong supporter of com- 
petitive athletics. 

Nothing breeds excellence as well as 
competition. I am totally dedicated, and 
have been all my life, to strong varsity 
programs in our nation's schools. Thus, I 
trust that you will bear in mind that my re- 
marks related to athletics for all in no way 
imply a dilution or weakening of inter-scho 
lastic programs. 

Need for the Foundation 

President Kennedy, more than any other 
political leader, recognized the physical fit- 
ness problem of the American people. This 
problem is a result of urbanization and tech- 
nology which have virtually eliminated mus- 
cular effort from our daily lives. This void 
must be filled. Varsity athletics do a good 
job for a small percentage of young men. 
The need exists for all of our boys — and 
girls. 

Objectives of the Foundation 

The President's Council on Physical Fit- 
ness has as its major objective the establish- 
ment of satisfactory fitness programs in all 
of the nation's schools. Thanks to the excel- 
lent campaign of the Advertising Council, a 
majority of Americans have become aware 
of this need and great progress has been 
made in meeting it. 

It is self-evident that in order to play a 
game with satisfaction an individual must 
possess agility, strength, coordination and 
flexibility. These are the qualities developed 
by basic fitness programs. 

The Foundation will supplement the 
efforts of the President's Council on Physi- 
cal Fitness by assisting in the establishment 
of more opportunities for citizens to learn 
skills of these sports that can be played and 
enjoyed throughout life. 

How the Foundation will operate 

Funds of the Foundation will be grant- 
ed on a project basis to organizations that 
are manned and capable of contributing to 
the obiectives as stated. At no time does the 
Foundation contemplate establishing a size- 
able staff. There are three major areas in 
which the Foundation hones to be effective 
— schools, recreation denartments and ser- 
iContinued on Page Five) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



DECEMBER, 196.3 



VOL. xxvni— NO. 5 



Pablished monthly, exc^>t Jane and July, by the Kentucky 

Hiffh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington, Ey. 46501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ey. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville 

Vice-Pretident Preston Holland (1965-69), Murra> 

Directors — Morton Combi (196i-66 Can- Creek: Don Davii 
(1968-67). independence; Ralph C. Dorstr (1962-66), Horse 
Caye; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville; Oran C. Teatei (1964-68). Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.96 Per Tear 

^'lom the Commcssione'i s Office 



REPORTS PAST Dl t 

1 1965 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members of the Delegate Assembly at the forth- 
coming 1966 annual meeting of the Association were 
elected by the principals of K.H.S.A.A. member schools- 
on ballots returned to the State Office before Novem 
ber 15. There were several ties in the voting for dele- 
gate and alternate. These ties were broken recently, 
with the delegates and alternates involved being de- 
termined by lot. The names of the district representa- 
tives are as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) J. M. Martin, (2l John Robinson, (3) Joe Mc 
Pherson, (4j Robert Goheen, (5) Ercel B. Little, (6 
Ben Finley, (7) Fred Murray, (81 R. A. Belt. (9.i W. 
P. Wheeler, (10) Cecil Calvert, (111 William Jackson 
(12) Bowman Davenport, (13) Roy Reynolds, (14) 
Aaron Turner, (15) Dave Montgomery, (16) Larrj' 
McDonald, (17* Damon Ray, (18) Ray Hammers (19j 
John H. Branson, (20 1 Billy Smith, (21) Bobby Green, 
(22) Alfred H. Meyer, (23) WilUe D. Bruce, (25) Pat 
rick Boardman, (26) Earl Duncan, (27) James C. 
Bruce, (29) Frank R. Hatfield, (30 1 Samuel Moore, 
(31) WiOiam L. Mills, (32) Cvrus E. Greene, (33) 
Arthur J. Walsh, (34) Tom Ellis, (35) Ross Mills, (36:' 
Edward E. Ball, (37 1 Robert: Barlow, (38) Phillip 
Wood, (39) Orville B. Hayes, (40) Homer Fanning, 
(41) Lee Mills, (42) Robert B. Turner, (43) A. C. 
Thomas, (44) Luther Patrick, (45) Alex Stevens, (46) 
Joe Harper, (47l Collas L. Simpson, (48) Lawrence 
Kuhl, (49) David C. Jackson, (50) \^■. M. Hampton. 
(51) James PursifuU, (.521 George Francis, (53) R05 
T. Reasor, (54 1 Fred W. Johnson, (55) Vesper Single, 
ton, (56 1 Russell Bowen, Jr., (57) Paul Trimble, (581 
Denzil Halbert, (59i Fred W. Ox, (60) James T. Dot- 
son (61) Russell Boyd, (62) Jack Fultz. (63) Jim Con- 
ley. (64) Jack Cnifford. 



(1) Frank McCann, (2) Richard L. Winebarger. 
(3) C. W. Jones, (4) Joe NaU, (5) Odell Walker, (6) 
Jude Talbot (7) David Siria, (8) Frank Simpson (9) 
Lawrence McGinnis, (10) James Adkins. (11) Earl 
Russell, (12) BiU Lee, (13) Jim Young, (14) Ron 
(3iumbley, (15) Roj- Withrow, (16) Prentice Stanfoni, 
(17) Kenneth Riddle, (18) Cortland Cox, (19) Garland 
Creech, (20) Brooks Turner, (21) J. C. Cantrell, (22) 



Lawrence Burdon, (23) T. T. Knight, (25) Art Moody, 
(26) V. M. Brucchieri, (27) John Holbrook, (29) Harvey 
G. Bush, (30) Lyman Dale, (31) W. L. HoUoway, (32) 
Ralph Blakey, (33) Donald Wihnhoff, (34) George 
Schneider, (35) Gene Foster, (36) Robert F. Dozier. 
(37) L. M. Stamper, (38) Larry Stephenson, (39) Ezra 
Whalen, (40) E. G. Nicholson, (41) Jack Black, (42i 
Zeb Blankenship. (43) .Andy Hopkins, (44) L. R. Single- 
ton, (451 Albert Wall, (46) Aubrey Johnson, (47) W. 
Norris Manning (48) Ray Bowling, (49) Henrj" Garri- 
son, (50) P. M. Broughton, (51) Wayland Jones, (52i 
Dan Beaslej", (53 1 Henry Ed. Wright, (54) Homei 
Jones. (55 • Pearl Combs, (56) Bill C. Hurt, (57) W. H. 
Conlej-, (58 1 John CampbeU, Jr., (59) Qiarles Wright. 
(60 1 Robei) Slone, (61) Warren Cooper, (62) John 
Hartig (63i Frank Firestwne, (64) Clyde Hunsaker. 

MINUTES OF MEETING 

K.H.S.A.A. WRESTLING COMMITTEE 

Lexington, Ky., November 13, 1965 

Present were: Mr. Ted Sanford, Mr. Will Evans. 
Mr. Oi-viUe Williams, Brother Leopold, C.F.X. 

Mr. Sanford opened the meeting by informing the 
Committee that two more schools have started wrest- 
ling programs. 

Ml'. Will Evans then gave a report of the meeting 
he attended in Chicago (October. 1965). THE CENTRAL 
STATES MEETING FOR WRESTLING RULES 
INTERPRETERS. 

Mr. Evans stated that the meeting was conducted 
by two men well known in wrestMng circles, Mr. Finn 
Erickson and Mr. Jolni Roberts, Executive Secretarj- 
of the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association. It 
was pointed out by Mr. Evans that through these meet- 
ings there is the hope that there wiU develop through- 
out the United States an interpretation of the rules 
that is accepted by all. He said that Mr. Erickson and 
Ml'. Roberts conduct meetings of this nature through- 
out the United States, thus spreading this idea of con- 
formity' to one interpretation of a rule. 

Ml'. Evans pointed out further that 14 states were 
represented at the meeting, indicating a keen interest 
in wrestiing in the United States. For the first time 
there were representatives from some parts of the 
South where wrestUng seems to be catching on. It 
seemed to be a common opinion, according to Mr. 
Evans, among those present at the meeting that wrest- 
Ung would not grow in any state where intercollegiate 
wrestiing was not part of the program or where the 
Physical Education departments did not include wrest- 
ling in the training of the physical education major in 
the colleges of the state. 

Mr. Evans recommended and the Committee con- 
curred that our state colleges should be urged to put 
wrestling in their Physical Education programs and to 
establish intercollegiate wrestling so that in future 
years the need for wrestling coaches in the state oi 
Kentuckj" will be filled. Individual members of the 
Committee intend to make contact with colleges that 
are members of the O.V.C. and the S.E.C. to encour- 
age the training of wrestling coaches and the estab- 
lishment of intercollegiate wrestling. 

Mr. Evans pointed out one rule change that was 
brought up at (Chicago. All take-downs would now be 
awarded two points. Ci Wrestling Guide p.2. 
STATE TOURNAMENT 

The place and date of the State Wrestling Tourna- 
ment will be announced at a future date since ar- 
rangements are still being made. 

Weigh-in for tournament: There will be one weigh- 
in for the tournament. 

Riding time: to avoid the problems involved in 
keeping riding time £md to cut down the expense of 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



Page Three 



hiring timers, the Committee has set up the following 
conditions for the awarding of points for riding time: 

1. The individual wrestler may receive only one 
point for riding time during a match. 

2. There will be no riding time accredited to pither 
wrestler in the first round. 

"!. The wrestler who starts a round in the offen- 
sive (up) position is the one who can gain time 
advantage. 

a. He must keep control throughout the entire 
round. 

b. He must not be penalized by the referee for 
any violations. 

c. No riding time will be accredited to a 
wrestler who does not fulfill all of these 
conditions. 

d. One point will be given to the wrestler who 
does fulfill these conditions. 

This ruling o:i rid'ng time w'll be substituted in 
place of Rule 8 section 2 in the Wrestling Guide. 
Growtli of Wrestling 

The K.H.S.A.A. WRESTLING COIVIMITTEE MEET- 
ING was closed on a hopeful note that wrestling will 
grow in Kentucky as more and more men come out 
of Kentucl<y colleges trained to coach and to referee 
wrestling and when those who should be concerned 
with the physical and character development of our 
young men realize the great benefits that accrue to 
the young man who participates in a sound wrestling 
program. 

—Brother Leopold, C.F.X. 



MINUTES OF MEETING 

K.H.S.A.A. SWIMMING MEET 

Lexington, Ky., November 13, 1965 

■ The meeting was called to order at 10:00 A.M. in 
the office of the Commissioner. The following committee 
members were present: Mr. Marshall Beard, Mr. E. 
W. Craik, Mr. Don Davis (Board of Control member), 
Commissioner Ted Sanford, and Mr. Alfred Reece. 
Miss Sheila C. Gilreath had sent her regrets by maiil 
as not having been able to attend the meeting. Mr. 
Jack Thompson had informed the Commissioner earlier 
of his inability to attend, and had offered some sug- 
gestions for the committee's consideration. 

The first discussion dealt with a review of the phi- 
losophy of the swimming program at the state's sch- 
olastic level. 

In reviewing the 1964 - 65 season, the committee 
feels that it is necessary to make the statement that 
the K.H.S.A.A. endorses interscholastic rules as pro- 
posed annually in the NCAA Swimming Guide. Furth- 
ermore, the committee emphasizes that these rules 
have been followed for a long period of time, there 
having been exceptions only when necessary in certain 
former Qass B and Class C Programs. 

The size of the Class A meet in Louisville was 
brought to the attention of the committee. Mr. Thomp- 
son had suggested that consideration be given to sep- 
arate Class A state meets for boys and girls. The 
committee felt that no change in the present plan 
should be made for the 1965-66 season, but that it was 
probable that in 1966-67 separate state meets for girls 
and boys or a two-day meet might be in order. 

As to the new rule changes, it was agreed that the 
scoring plan suggested in Rule IV, Section 4, of the 
1966 NCAA Swimming Guide does not apply, and that 
Section 3 does apply to the K.H.S.A.A. meets. No action 
was taken at this time with reference to Mr. Thomp- 
son's proposal of qualifying eight swimmers for the 
finals. 

Mr. Sanford advised the committee that the 



Board of Control in a recent meeting adopted swim- 
ming regulations, providing that schools having swim- 
ming teams shall be assigned to Class AAA or Class AA 
on the basis of enrollments in Grades 10-12. Class AAA 
in Swimming ncu replaces Class A, and Class AA re- 
places Class B, Class AAA will incude those high 
5chools with enrollments of .SOO or more (grades 10-12), 
and Class AA will include those schools with enroll- 
ments of 800 or less. 

The committee was unanimous in the opinion that 
it should assume the responsibility of selecting the 
officials for its championsiiip meets. This relieves the 
Meet Manager of this important task. It was expressed 
that the Meet Manager has enough to do without the 
responsibility of selecting officials. 

Mr. Davis suggested that ribbons be awarded to 
4th, 5th, and 6th place finalists, the appropriate pat- 
terns, colors, etc., to be worked out by the Commis- 
.sioner. 

Mr. Reece suggested that this committee was not 
represented enough by "schDol personel." He pointed 
out that aside from the ex-officio members, Mr. Davis 
and Mr. Sanford, only Mr. Beard is associated with 
the interscholastic program. It was suggested that 
the committee be increased in number, to include at 
least two other men and another woman high school 
faculty member. The Commissioner stated that Presi- 
dent, Foster J. Sanders, would be advised of this com- 
mittee request. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:45 A.M. 
— Alfred Reece. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
Is the home phone number unless otherwise desifimated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

\g,'e. Dannv B., Beech Creek. 47B-8048 

Allen, Joe M., :i04 Braden St.. Hopkinsville, TU li-5534 

Ard, L. .!.. Route No. 4, Nancy. 871-3616 

Ball. Gary Wayne, P. O. Bo.\ 24. Beech Grove, 273-3882 

Barnette, Jerry. Route No. 1, Box 455, Pikeville, 132-2328 

BauKh, Glenn C. 228 Combs Hall, E. K. S. C, Richmond, i;2:J- 

7340, 623-9825 
BauKh, Rodney, 441 Oak, Ludlow. 581-5995, 581-5995 
Beltzner, August C, Jr., Morehead St. College, Box 349, More- 
head, 4-9007 
Bibb, William C. 718 Suffolk Drive, Owensboro, 684-2759, 423- 

5866 
Bishop, Heulyn. 340 Kenwood Rd., Russell, 836-5906, 836-3531 
Bradford, Mike, Box 245, Cumberland College, Williamsburg, 

664-3632, 9015 
Brock, Alben, Kettle Island, 337-5027 
Browder, Homer Lee, 127 Cottage Ave.. Henderson, 826-2123, 

827-5671 
Brown, John W., "Scoop", 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 252- 

0954, 252-3212 
Burden, James E., Veller Drive, Route No. 3, Beaver Dam, 

274-3223 (Bus.l 
Burdette, Wally M., 1514 Oleanda Ave., Louisville 366-5559 
Burrows, Walter H., Jr., Route No. 1, Lee Road, Paducah, 

442-8335 
Bryan, Phil, Thorn Hill School, Frankfort, CA 3-8403, CA 3- 

8369 
Burch, Billy Wayne, 114 South Burns, Winchester, 744-7030 
Byrd, Denny Wayne, Highland Park, Williamsburg, 4667 
Campbell. John, Jr., Garrett, 358-3061, 358-3461 
Carroll, Gene F., 5516 Whispering Hills Blvd., Louisville. 964- 

5591 969-3271 
Chipley, David, 720 Aurora Ave., Lexington, 254-1777 
Clark, Kenneth R., Route No. 1. Calhoun, BR 3-3122. BR 3-3091 
Cobb, Michael B.. Box 1022, Bowling Grene, 842-9073, 843-61B1 
Collins. Larry, 3540 Jacqueline Drive, Erianger, 341-9359. 631- 

0010 
Collier, Ray. Jr., Warfield 
Conn, Delano, Printer 

Copley, Howard E., Crum High School, Crum, W. Va. 
Costigan, Jimmie, Route No. 1, Mt. Sterling, 927, Frenchburg, 

SO 8-2145 
Crawford, Jerry, D.. 301 Woodford, Lawrenceburg, 839-6333 
Crawford, W. Gordon, 2609 Kings Highway, l^ouisville, OL 

1-5906, SP 8-5531 e.xt. 278 
Creekmore. Ken. P. O. Box 514, Oneida, Tenn.. 569-8731. 5P.9- 

<72n 

Crump. Richard G.. 1612 Callowiiy Ave. Murray 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE EOR DECEMBER, 1965 



('..111. 



N.'w Huston, Ohio, C.L 



Diiv, O. C, 9;l;t Wiilnut Tiirk Dr., Owensboru, (i84-(>014, (iH'l- 

B286 
Dcaton, Chiu-lt's, Jr.. Ho.x 2,s;i, IrviiiKton, mi-UC-.i. EMzabeth- 

town, YSri-OSlH 
DL-Hosautt, Ki-unk, 482.1 Jiluebinl Ave, I-diiisvilk', ',)(il).;i910, 

778-27:11 c.\t. -1(11) 
Dil.iiri-rr/,.., Paul K., Morehead State ColleKo, Miiiuhfaci. 784-9007 
Disncv, Clenn D.. Ho.x 212, Richmoiul 
Durbiii, Roy, 2911 Dale Ann Drive, Louisville. 452-1730, BS7- 

1121 ext. 4(i6 
Duvall. Ronald, ColleRe Station, Hox 58B, Murray, 763-7837 
Dykes. Larry, Box 27.'f, CollcRe HciRhts, liowlinK Green, 842- 

907S 
Enry. Edward H.. .Jr.. 30il Glendalc. LcxinRton, 2.'>2-05(i8. 2B2- 

.5004 
Elliott. Eric, 202 West 13th St., Murray, 763-74B0, 753-74511 
EmbiT. Randy 1).. 1913 Oxford Circle, Apt. No. 2, LexinKlon. 

264-1684 
EnKland, Larry A., Route No. 2, Murray. 763-6153 
Farlee. Harold. 2720 Field Ave.. Louisville. 893-3207. 893-3207 
Farley. Jimmy. W. Jefferson St.. Beren. 287-6101 (Uus.l 
Fey. Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, 441-6288, B62-D461 
Finley, Ron, 9120 Kenlock Drive, Louisville, 425-2300. 582-2613 
Fort, John W., Austin Peay State ColleKe, Clarksvillc, Tenn., 

C45-2B5B. Ft. Campbell 4918 
Frazcr. Tom Roe. 1002 Main. Sturtris, 333-4412, 333-4672 
Fretcr, Rex R., 302 ColleKe Court. Murray. 762-4442, 762-4442 
Fulker-son, James R., 1611 Navajo Dr.. Owensboro, 684-B4B8, 

683-6271 
Fuller. Terry R.. 669 Cherry, Madisonville, 821-2063 
Gaines, Curtis, 29 Maple St.. Henderson. 826-993,1. 827-3708 
Gardner, Gary. Route No. 3. MaKnolia. 628-2947 
Garwood. David L.. 8451 Pollux Court, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Goodman, Richard, Box 404, Pikevlile, 437-7496 
Gordon, Roy T.. Route No. 6, Shelbyville. 633-4929, 633-9135 
Grote, Hal. 4008 Jamestown, Cincinnati, Ohio, 921-0138, B41- 

3271 
Hall. Charles E.. 219 Floral Park. LexinRton. 278-3995. 252- 

3445 ext. 227 
Hall. Phillip, 1621 Dcei- Park, Louisvlilc, 4B1-6482 
Hammock, Jack E.. Box 39B. WhitcsburR. 633-7B58 
Harper. Dennis, Box 63. FranchburR. 2660. SO 8-3941 
Harris. Wayne, Route No. 2, Somerset, 679-2184 
Hawkins. Will A,, 407 Grace St,, SprinRfield, Tenn., 384- 

8978, 384-5583 
Helton, Lewis W., 334 Knox, Box 136, Barbourville, 642-2471. 

246-3920 
Henderson, Robert I,., Route No. 1. Water Valley, 355-2201 
Hinkle. Malvin B.. 21 Cameron St., Paris, 987-4201, 987-1235 
Hobbs, Charles V,, 627 Westview Drive, Ashland. 324-9439. 

325-4071 
HollinRswoith, Ralph, 8th Ave., IS. F, Goodrich Store, SprinR- 

field, Tenn.. 384-6467, 384-6700 
HoUowull, Jame.s R.. 1109 Atkinson St.. Henderson. VA 7-9602 
Hooks. Bob. 107 North 17th St., Murray, 763-6908 
Horsman, Bill. 512 Iowa, Louisville, 637-1201. 683-7621 
Hutchens. Jim. Box 103, Belfry. 237-1204. 353-7362 
Irby, Michael P.. Groce St.. Burkesville. 864-4114. 864-3461 
Jackson, Bobby R., 6826 Dallas Drive. Valley Station, 937-4387 
Jackson, Edward, 2507 West 9th St., Owensboro, MU 4-4664 
Johnson. Victor F.. 593 MoheRan Trail. GeroRetown. 2117. 832- 

6286 
Johnson. Willie Bob. 941 McClure Ave., Henderson. VA 7-3626 
Jones. Robert L.. Jr., Old Ekron Rd., Box 303. BrandenburR. 
422-2977, 422-2101 

Jordan. John 171 Lewis St., Hnpkinsville, 886-8642 
Judy. Carl D,, Rankin Road, Hiplev. Ohio, 392-4749 
Karasick, Howard, 330 East Mlh St., HowlinR Green, 842-6718 
Keeton, C. E.. "Buck", 242 Emmetl Drive, Bowlinp Green, 842- 

4336, 843-3040 
Keller. Richard E.. Box 64, Pembroke, 476-4315 
Kinder, Robert A., 626 Anniston Dr., LexinRton, 299-0793, 

2B4-.3746 
Koehne, Charles. 1826 Sherman. Norwood 12, Ohio. 531-4542 
Kyle. Troy, 3111 Meadowlark, Louisville, 635-7361, 637-1421 

ext. 217 
Ladd. Jerry, 1304 Phelps. Hopkinsville. 886-B483. 886-1284 
Laubbeimer. Don T.. 4B16 Estate Drive, Louisville. 366-3880, 

B84-0133 
Lawson, Leiand, 949 Deporres, LexinRton, 2B4-1009. 2B2-3044 
Lay. William B.. 1268 Gainesway Drive. T.oxinRton, 266-6243, 

2B2-2260, ext. 2208 
Layne, Bert. Box 13. Manton. BIT 5-3012 
Leathers, Henry. 21B1 Goldsmith Lane. Louisville. 4B9-4991, 

B84.3211 ext. 339 
Lecpiire. Harold M., Horton Addition, Harlan, B73-18B7, B73-5161 
Lewi^. Gary Wayne, 271 Hemlock, Box 411. Benham. 848-6737 
Lopp, Wilbur. 190(i Hoke Rd,. Louisville 
Lucas, Jack (',,, 012 Elsmere Park. ],exinRton. 265-1067, 265- 

3880, ext. 318 
Lurker. Mel, 1661 Olive, Evansvlile, Jnd,, HA 5-3929, HA 3-6876 
McBride, Kenneth. 167 St. William Dr.. LexinRton, 266-7786, 

255-0666 
McClure, William Scotl. 1', O, Box 250. London. 864-2255, 864- 

5165 
McCull.\, Mike H,. 667 Cherry. Mailisonville, 821-2244, 821- 

2067 



McKen-iie, Robert, Russell, 836-6193 

McMillan, Terry, 2B35 Avon Drive, So. Ft. Mitchell, 341-1028, 

721-4477 
Marcum, Homer F., Lovely, 396-6294 

Marlette, Ronald L., 133 Lyon Drive, Frankfort, 227-6784 
Marshall, Glenn RoRer, Waco, 369-5962 

Mayes, Edward, 838 Crossbill Rd., Danville, 236-3264, 236-6131 
Mayfield, Clarkie, 124 Sunset Drive, HodRenville, 358-4326. 358- 

3195 
Meek, Walter E., Williasmport, 789-6697 

Meilear, Leiand, 1908 W. Market St., Louisville, 585-4710 
Miller, John D., CIraksville, Tenn., 647-3692, 647-6361 
Miller, L. O., Jr.. 2731 Harrison. Paducah. 442-0014, 444-6311 
Miracle. Ed. Box 998. Lynch. 848-2903, 848-6486 
Miracle, Orville, 531 Kentucky Ave., Pineville, 337-3492, 337- 

2329 
Mitchell. Jerry E.. 201 — G Thornton Court. Hopkinsville, 886- 

4196. 886-6363 
Mitchell. Merrill. Route No. 1, Ewing, 615-63 
Newman, Bill, 2635 Ritchie, Portsmouth, Ohio, 353-6257 (Bus.) 
Newman, Larry, 322 West Sun St., Morehead. 784-4721 
Nuss, Albert M., 6614 Estele Ave., Louisville, 367-6791. 368- 

6825 
Oiler. Jerry. 1309 Allen, Owensboro, 684-6024 
Omdahl. Jack. 1656 Alexandria Dr., Lexington, 278-2646, 255- 

6860 ext. 2207 
Owen, Harry E., 232 Lowry Lane. LexinRton, 277-9019 
O'Nan, Harold L., 2609 Sunset Lane, Henderson, VA 6-4898 
Pape, Richard, 621 South 8th St., Mayfield, 247-2882 (Bus.) 
Pardue. Robert E., 221 Shelley Drive, Glasgow, 651-2466, 651- 

5652 
Parker, Joseph H., 107 Wellington St., Hickman. 236-2163 
Perkins, James Melvin, Route No. 5. Glasgow. 678-6568. 465- 

9919 
Parrish. Willie. Box 601. Winchester, 744-2903. 744-6668 
Pedigo. Albei-t. 610 Gheens Ave., Louisville 368-1283. 368-6505 
Peters, Arthur, Lida, 864-2331 (Bus.) 

Pogue, Ivan, G., 248 Emmett Drive, Bowling Green, 843-9972 
Porco, Ken. 3924 Layside Dr., Louisville 

Prewitt, Allan, Hamilton Ave., Lancaster, 792-2746, 548-2631 
Purcell, Billy D., 110 Hopewell, Paris, 987-4231, 262-2260 ext. 

3565 
Pursiful, O'Dell, Box 69, Cumberland College, Williamsburg 
Raikes, Larry D., East Main St., HodRenville, 368-3678, 358- 

3678 
Ratliff, Donald, 1601 ArRillite Rd., Flatwoods, 836-5000 
Ratliff. Harold, 616 HiRh St., Russell, 836-8504 
Ravenscraft, Glendon, 39 Newman Ave., Ft. Thomas. 441-6991, 

694-6112 
RawlinRs. Charles. French St.. Elizabethtown, 766-2629, 766- 

5237 
Ricketts, Claude O., 1606 Larchmont Ave., Louisville, 635-6536, 

634-1551 ext. 220 
Roberts, Jimmy A., Box B016, Grandview Drive, Owensboro 
RodRers, Grover, Jr., Route No. 3, Campbellsville, 465-8973, 

466-8973 
Rothfuss, Richard, 37 Gregory Lane, Ft. Thomas. 441-9190, 431- 

6990 
Rupert, Ray, 3186 Arrowhead, Lexington, 277-4481 
Scott, CraiR, Box 110, Totz, 589-4623 
Sears, Wilson, 524 SprinRdale Rd., Brandenburg, 422-2805, 

422-3201 
Seavers, Joe, 2617 Ann St.. Ludlow. 291-8926, 341-0213 
Shadle, Clark, 334 Knox, Barbourville, 546-4746, 646-3920 
Sharp, Robert J., 2909 Jessup Rd., Cincinnati. Ohio 
Shewmaker, Treffert 634 Longview, Lexington. 277-9117, 255- 

3815 
Shipley, Charles, Leestown Junior High, Lexington, 262-2655 

(Bus.) 
Slinker, Dennis R., Route No. 1, Sacramento, 764-3216 
Small, Bill, 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., Louisville, 448-4859, 

584-6308 
Smith, Jack David, Orchard Heights, Apt. 10, Murray, 762- 

4479, 762-3681 
Stephenson, Thomas H., 3621 Brighton Cove, Paducah, 443- 

6102, 442-3186 
Stevens, James L., 110 Hambv Ave., Dawson Springs, 797- 

2201, 763-1549 
Stewart. James E., 209 Michigan Ave., Whitesburg 
Sutphin, William O., 2713 Herman Ave.. Ashland. 324-8028, 

324-2136 
Tackett, Archie, Inez, 298-3445, Morehead 784-9086 
Taylor, James Alfred. Pikeville ColleRe, Box 616, Pikeville, 

437-9191, 437-4051 
Taylor, Norman, 29 College Courts, Barbourville, 546-4070 
Taylor. Richard. Route No. 1. Williamstown. 824-6800. 623-9912 
Taylor. Rogers E.. 4847 Grandview Dr.. Owensboro, 684-6992, 

684-7219 
Thomas, Patrick H., Box 43, Leitchfield, 269-3010, 269-3850 
Turner, Bruce, 1466 High, Paris, 987-2713, 987-9030 
Turner. James W., Garrett 

Walton. Roy, 106 Vanderbilt, Lexington, 277-2241 
Ward. David C, Route No. 2. Cecilia, 862-4630, 862-1924 
Warner, C. V., Route No. 1, Box 144, Somerset, 678-6686, 679- 

1342 
Watkins, Gerald, 4310 Sadie Lane, Louisville, 366-3866. 683-767.J 
Weber, Jack. 720 Valleywood Dr., Toledo, Ohio. 693-2763 
Welch. J. D.. 2508 Forest Ave.. Ashland. 324-3337, 324-1155 

ext. 367 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



Paige Five 



OLD KENTUCKY HOME — CLASS A FINALIST 



pJi 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Martin Simms, Eddie Spalding, Glen Downs, Eugene Sorrell, Ricky 
Crenshaw, Pat Bradley, Hark Parrish, Tommy Hamed. Ronnie Florence, Jack Foster, Benny Price, 
Ronnie Stone- Second Row: Leslie Keeling, Barry Mattingly, Bob Bessinger. Joe Wheeler, Jerry Halgash, 
Larry McMurray, David Hobbs, Warren Cheek, Martin Evans. Donnie Sympson. Danny Hayden. 

LYNCH — CLASS A, REGION 4, DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 



»■ -^m '\'M£^' ■i'«#fc» 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Edward Massey, John Crum, Sylmon Jackson, M-ke Snow, Richa 
Roger Greer. John Carroll, John Hasy. Louis Monhollen, (ier-ld Roberts, Charles Estep. Second Row: 
Joe Washington, Benny Massev, Eddie McClellan, Robert Gaines, Rufus Gist, Sanford Baskin, Terry 
Sundy, Norman Thompson, Ulis Price, Doug Sizemore Larry Hale. Third Row: Coach Ed Miracle Larry 
Mason, Arthur Jackson, Michael Roberts. Mickey Webb, Curtis Flanary, Troy Poff, David Hcskins. 
William Green, Randy Perry, Thomas Harris, Mike Kirby, Darriel Washington, Ass't Coach John Morgan. 
Fourth Row: Ass't Coach Ronald Graham. Leonard Amos, Thomas Jenkins. Albert Price, Terry Smith, 
Gerald Jackson. John Dixon, David Sizemore, Bobby Joe Golden. Thomas Rosco, Ass't Coach John Staley. 
Fifth Row: Mgrs. Jim Bob Queener, Clayton Phillips, Hubert Boggs. 



Welch, Ronald J.. Route No. 2, Worthville, 732-.5575 

White, James T., 101 Ridgewood Court, Alexandria. 635-2120, 

635-2633 
Willey, Harold L.. 2213 Inwood Drive, Huntington. W. Va. 
Williams, Benny D.. Route No. 3. Philpot. PA 9-4566 
Williams, Danny, 515 Beech, Falmouth, 654-8305 
Wright, Larry L.. 4415 Bellevue Ave.. Louisville, 637-1421 ext. 

205 (Bus.) 
York, Jim, 5114 Outer Loop, Louisville, 964-0154, GL 4-7511 

ext. 3794 



Lifetime Sports Foundation 

(Continued from Page One) 

vice organizations. In each of these areas the 
same problems exist. Administrators of the 
entity must be convinced that they have a 
responsibility to fitness and the teaching of 
sports skills. Once this responsibility is ac- 
cepted, instructors must be taught, through 
workshops and clinics, the most modern 
effective means of teaching these skills. 

What you can do 

Everyone with a full-time job is pressed 



to stay abreast of his own work. A person's 
time is perhaps his precious commodity. To 
ask you to give your time is a presumptuous 
request. I do so because of one irrefutable 
fact. 

Each of you in your community is the 
authority in all things related to fitness and 
athletic programs. Your position is one of 
continuing public interest. Your statements 
and opinions are covered by the press. There- 
fore what you have to say related to fitness 
programs and competition for all will be 
listened to by all citizens in vour community. 
You constitute the most effective voice we 
can have speaking in behalf of school fitness 
and carry-over sports programs for all girls 
and boys. 

I trust that you will support our efforts. 

Thank you again for the opportunity to 
speak before this distinguished audience. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



The Flying Dutchman 

Kentucky is fast becoming' the most 
recreation-conscious state in the nation and 
its communities are demanding the most 
modern recreation building? and programs 
Every coach and principal is being looked tc 
for recreational guidance by the people they 
serve. It's a 100 to 1 bet that your county 
needs a community building right now. 

When you make your next ti'ip to Louis- 
ville, turn off the Dixie Highway and drive 
a mile back East Pages Lane to see the 
latest in modern recreation buildings in 
Jefferson County's new Waverly Park. 
Abutting the Waverly all-purpose recreation 
building is a golf course which will rival the 
beauty of Oran Teater's golf links in those 
Paintsville mountains. Ask Waverly recrea- 
tion directors "Sad Sam" Jones or Carlos 
Porter to show you the building which con- 
tains a clubhouse for the golf course, a li- 
brary, snack bar, kitchen, projection room 
and recreation hall, air-conditioned through- 
out. Then go back to your communities, 
get your county attorney to help you get 
federal aid to get buildings like this one 
dotted all over Kentucky's landscape. 

Attention Guy Strong at Kentucky Wes- 
leyan College in Owensboro ! In your college 
is an up and coming young recreation direc- 
tor who can do your city and college a lot 
of recreational good. This young man helped 
construct this modern recreation plant 
from the ground up. Ask Donnie Sehmied tc 
lend his know-how to the advancement of 
recreation in western Kentucky! This 
former all-state guard at Eastern High 
School has three years of recreational exper- 
ience under his belt in the Flying Dutch- 
man's program. When Donnie gets his de- 
gree the Dutchman wants him back in his 
program though. 

The automobile the Dutchman drives in 
his sashays over Kentucky has become a 
convei'sation piece among the coaches and 
officials. Bob Daniels, the all-time Western 
great, took one look as the Dutchman drove 
into Beaver Dam and said. "Charlie's still 
driving that 1957 "Tiger of the Turnpike." 
In 1964 John Bunn, Cliff Fagan and Doc 
Runyon tied the doors of "The Tiger" shut 
with a piece of roue Doc brought from Chi- 
caaro but they still rattle. "Scood" Brown 
didn't believe "The Tiger" would make it 
this year but Lexington's Coach Joe Hall 
wore out two new models trying to keep up 
with the Flving Dutchman. Incidentally, 
Coach Joe Hall's children were being driven 
to school in Lexington on Veteran's Day 
when a little friend asked, "What are they 




The Dutchman 

celebrating?" Joe's little son quickly replied, 
"Vettiner's Day." 

Principal Tom Simmons of Allen Coun- 
ty High and his Coach, Jimmy Bazzell, are 
two of the greatest Kentuckians to "come 
down the pike" in a long time. They are also 
two of the best hunters and fishermen. Tom 
had the Dutchman spend a day in Scottsville 
in October. There's the place to go, hunters! 
I'd rather have Tom hunt with me than that 
bird dog Coach Ed Diddle used to call "Rex". 
His nose is as sensitive as the accelerator 
on "The Tiger of the Turnpike." 

In case you've lost track of Coach W. E. 
"Everett" Waller, who turned out those 
cracker-jack teams at Slick Rock, Munford- 
ville and Fort Knox, just take a look in 
Fountain Run where he is living the "Life of 
Riley." A champion checker player, Coach 
Waller has retired on his school teacher's 
pension and now goes all over the country 
playing in checker tournaments. Everett also 
fishes, hunts and makes all the basketball 
tournaments to keep life, without coaching, 
from being boring. His last coaching assign- 
ment was at Fort Knox. A checker match 
worth driving miles to see would be Foun- 
tain Run's Waller versus Inez's Russ Wil- 
liamson. 

The Dutch boy gets letters and here's 
one asking for a basketball ruling: — Al has 
received a pass from A2'. He places the ball 
on the floor, straightens up and then bends 
over to pick the ball up again and dribbles. 
The ruline here is that Al is guilty of a 
double dribble. A dribble was completed 
when he picked the ball up from the floor. 
Al could have passed or shot but he could 
not dribble aorain — in spite of what the Globe 
Trotters tell you. 

Another letter is from Larry Harner of 
Heath High School in West Paducah. That's 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



Page Seven 



MURRAY — CLASS A, REGION I, DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




<Left to Right) Front Row: Dubia. Cunningham. Doran Thomas, Sprunger, J. Wilkins, E. West. Diuguid. 
Second Row: D. Nanny, S. West, Owen. V. Dunn. Weatherly, Emersffn, G. Wilkins, Sammons. Third 
Row: Johnson McCoy, B. Dunn, Campbell, Scott, B. Hart, Willaims. Lax. Fourth Row: Wall, Geurin, 
Bland S. Smith Goode, Hale, T. Hart Shelton. Fifth Row: Taylor. Armbruster, Henry. K. Smith, 
Gish, Bell, Clark, Sixth Row: Nanny. Coach Holland, Coach Shelton, Coach Cartwright, Coach Toon, 
S. Knight, Heise, Coach Russell. 

GLASGOW — CLASS A, REGION I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: John Vance, Jim Lile, Gene England, Joe Kerney, Donnie Faught, Wayne 
Smith, Bill Harward, Gary Goode, Larry Nunn, Phil Stephens, Bruce Goodman, John Jones, Robert 
Morrison. Second Row : Mgr. Larry Alexander, Bill Humphrey, Dennis Fant, Anthony Stephens. Terry 
Leech, Joe Simmons, Don Barrickman. Richard Harris. Joe Hale, Joe Byrd. Mike Sullivan. David 
Oliver Clif McCandless, Mgr. Randall Cook. Third Row: Jim Miles, David Pavne, Ronnie Thompson, 
Charles Gordon, Glen Cole, Ernie Myers, Steve Riddle. Roger Proffitt. Bob Goode. Gary Foster. Jerry 
England, Charles Pichardo. Fourth Row: Coaches Sam Clark, Jim Richards. "Butch" Gilbert. Tom 
Downing. 



principal after my ole buddies, Rex Alexan- 
der and Roy Stewart, got him educated at 
Murray College. That lad's name is Don 
Stephenson. Larry recommends Mike Ma- 
theny for the Game Guy of 1966 award. A 
lionheart award has already been sent to this 
lad who plays volleyball and kickball besides 
working with the weights in spite of the 
facts that one leg is shorter than the other, 
one arm is of little use, he has braces on 
both legs and Cerebral Palsy. How courage- 
ous can you be? 

For sheer, raw intestinal fortitude the 
Dutchman doffs his fedora to Raceland's 
Jim McKnight who is one of the contenders 
for the Game Guy Award. Jim was recom- 
mended by Oran Teater, the Philanthropist 
of Paintsville; Ernie Chatin, the Mr. Recre- 



ation of 1965; and David Reed of Raceland. 

Here's what sports writer David Reed 
says about Jim McKnight, "For Jim Mc- 
Knight of Raceland playing football is not 
just a goal but a real challenge. Jim didn't 
become the local hero. He never ran a touch- 
down, nor did he make a tackle. Jim just 
played football, but for Jim this was a real 
accomplishment. Jim has had but one leg 
since he was ten days old." 

This lad went out for football, and while 
others quit the team because they were not 
willing to "pay the price" Jim kept working 
because he was determined to play quarter- 
back, and this young fighter is getting to 
call some of the signals. He is richly deserv 
ing of the lionheart award which has been 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



Official Dickinson Ratings For The 2965 Football Season 



CLASS A 

REGION I 

District 1 

Team W 

. Murray 5 

. Trigg County 5 

Ft. Campbell 5 

, Russellville 2 

Crittenden County 2 

. Fulton 1 

, Fulton County 1 

. Warren County 1 

District 2 

. Glasgow 6 

. Tompkinsville 4 

. Campbellsville 2 

Greensburg 2 

Metcalfe County 1 

Cumberland County 

REGION II 
District I 
Team W 

, Old Kentucky Home 7 

. Bardstown 3 

Eminence 3 

Lincoln Institute 2 

Springfield 2 

. Shepherdsville 1 

. Lebanon 

Louisville Country Day 

District 2 

, Boyle County 5 

. Frankfort 4 

Anderson 5 

. Stanford 5 



Mercer County 1 

Georgetown 

Harrodsburg 



Sayre 1 

Burgin 

REGION III 
District 1 
Team W 

Lloyd Memorial 5 

Bellevue 3 

Dayton 3 

Carroll County 3 

Ludlow 2 

. Beechwood 

Owen County 

District 2 
Mt. Sterling 4 

, Paris 2 

Bath County 2 

Nicholas County 3 



uth 

Irvine 

Mlilersburg Military Inst. -__ 3 

REGION IV 

District 1 

Team W 

. Lynch 7 



■ille 



3. London 6 

4. Williamsburg 4 

5. Harlan 2 

6. Hazel Green 2 

6. Loyall 2 

8. Lynn Camp 2 

9. Lily 3 

10. Barbourville 

11. Hall 

12. Wallins 

13. Mt. Vernon 

District 2 

1. Fleming-Neon 5 

2. Catlettsburg 5 

3. Morgan County 3 

4. Elkhorn City 3 

6. Pikeville 2 

6. Paintsville 1 

7. Wheelwright 1 

8. Wurtland 

CLASS AA 

REGION I 
District 1 

1. Hopkinsville 7 

2. Mayfield 5 

3. Christian County 3 

4. Paducah 3 

B. Caldwell County 4 



Rating 

25.00 
20.00 
18.57 
16.00 
13.33 
12.00 
12.00 
11.66 

22.50 
19.00 
15.00 
14.00 
12.00 
10.00 



Rating 
25.00 
18.75 
18.75 
17.50 
14.67 
12.50 
11.25 
10.00 

25.00 
25.00 
18.57 
18.57 
14.00 
11.44 
11.25 
10.71 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Rating 

23.75 
21.25 
19.00 
18.75 
16.00 
10.00 
N.R. 

22.50 
17.50 
16.00 
15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
N.R. 



Rating 

22.50 
21.25 
20.00 
19.47 
16.00 
15.00 
15.00 
12.50 
12.50 
10.83 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 

22.50 
20.00 
18.00 
16.67 
12.86 
12.00 
11.67 
N.R. 



22.50 
21.76 
18.75 
16.67 
14.45 



Franklin-Simpson 2 

Bowling Green 

District 2 

Henderson 5 

Owensboro 6 

Owensboro Catholic 3 

Madisonville 3 



nty . 
lanty 



Team W 

LaRue County 4 

St. Joseph 4 

Kentucky Military Inst. 3 

Ft. Knox 2 

Oldham County 4 

North Hardin 3 

Shelby County 2 

Elizabethtown 1 

Henry County 

Franklin County 1 

District 2 

Harrison County 7 

Henry Clay 7 

Dunbar 3 

Bryan Station 6 

Lafayette 5 

Bourbon County 4 

Shelbyville 5 

Danville 3 

Madison Central 2 

Madison 2 

Clark County 1 

Somerset 

Woodford County 

Jessamine County 2 

Tates Creek 

REGION ni 

District 1 

Team W 

Newpoi-t Catholic 5 

Highlands 5 

Holmes 3 

Campbell County 2 

Dixie Heights 2 

. Newport 1 

Boone County 

District 2 

Ashland 4 

Raceland 5 

. Louisa 1 

McKell 5 

Rowan County 1 

Boyd County 1 

Russell 2 

Fleming County 

REGION IV 
District 1 
Team W 

Middlesboro 5 

. Evarts 3 

, Cumberland 2 

. Corbin 



Knox Central 2 

Bell County 

District 2 
Belfry 6 

Hazard 4 



Prestonsburg 2 

Whitesburg 1 

M. C. Napier 

Leslie County 1 

CLASS AAA 

REGION I 



5. duPont Manual 4 

6. Trinity 3 

7. DeSales 1 

8. Atherton 1 

9. Bishop David 1 

10. Central 

REGION II 

District 1 

Team W 

1. Valley 4 

1. Pleasure Ridge Park 4 

3. Western 3 



25.00 
21.25 
19.17 
15.00 
12.22 
12.14 
10.71 



Rating 

24.38 
23.75 
21.00 
20.50 
20.00 
17.00 
14.00 
13.34 
12.50 
11.11 

30.00 
27.50 
22.50 
20.00 
19.38 
18.33 
17.78 
15.00 
15.00 
14.17 
13.57 
10.00 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Ratine 

25.00 
21.25 
18.00 
15.00 
13.33 
12.00 
10.00 

22.50 
20.00 
17.50 
16.43 
14.25 
13.33 
13.33 
N.R. 



Rating 

22.50 
20.00 
14.00 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 

25.00 
23.75 
17.86 
15.00 
11.67 
10.00 
N.R. 



Rating 

25.00 
21.25 
20.00 
18.57 
15.00 
14.29 
12.50 
12.43 
11.43 
10.00 



Rating 

23.75 
23.75 
20.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



Page Nine 



, Butler 3 

Southern 1 

Fairdale 

District 2 

Seneca 5 

Thomas Jefferson 5 

Waggener 4 

Westport 3 

Eastern 2 

Fern Creek 1 

Durrett 



20.00 
12.00 
10.00 

21.25 
21.25 
19.17 
15.00 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 1) 
If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Mitchell, Emmett D., 120 Hamilton Park. Lexington. 255-3511 
Seavers, Joe, 2517 Ann Street. Ludlow, 291-8925. 341-0213 
Williams. Bill E., Route No. 1, Box 140, Metropolis, Illinois, 
524-2561, 524-2711 



New From AAHPER 

DGWC BASKETBALL TECHNIQUE 
CHARTS 

Attractive 8V2 x 11 inch charts, suitable for bulletin 
board display, illustrate basic techniques of the girls 
and women's game. 

12 charts (243-0687S) $1.50 

DGWS STATEMENTS ON COMPETITION 

FOR GIRLS AND WOMEN 

Guidelines for both high school and college programs 

are now available in quantity. These statements first 

appeared in the September 1965 Journal, pages 34-37. 

Guidelines for Interscholastic Programs for High 

School Girls (243-^7690) 1-99, 10c each; 100 or 

more, 5c. 
Guidelines for Intercollegiate Athletic Programs for 

Women (243-07692) 1-99, 10c each; 100 or more, 5c. 

EVALUATION INSTRUMENTS IN 
HEALTH EDUCATION* 

An annotated bibliography of knowledge, attitude, 
and behavior tests for all grade levels through the first 
year of college. 

32 pages (244-07528) 25c 

WHY HEALTH EDUCATION* 

An interpretation of what health education is and is 
not and why it should be included in the school pro- 
gram. Appropriate for interpreting to school adminis- 
tration, boards of education, and parents. 
12 pp. (244-07640) 20c 

MENTAL HEALTH AND 
SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES* 

A discussion of the services which constitute the 
school's area of responsibility in providing for the men- 
tal health of school children. 

24 pp. (244-07642) 40c 

1965-66 MEMBERSHIP PACKETS AND 
PUBLICATIONS DISPLAY MATERIALS 

Order your materials for professional meetings 
several weeks in advance. Just give a brief description 
of the meeting, the number of participants expected to 
attend, and whether you wish to receive Membership 
Packets, Publications Display Materials, or both. Send 
your request to AAHPER Promotion Unit, 1201 16th 
Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036. Single copies 
of the current AAHPER memberships brochure and 
publications Ust are also sent on request. 

TO ORDER: Make checks payable to the National 
Education Association. 

Send payment with orders of $2.00 or less. Shipping 
and handling charges are added to all billed orders. 



No C.O.D.'s. Quantity orders of a single titie are sub- 
ject to these discounts: 2-9 copies, 10%; 10 or more 
copies, 20%. No discount on items with asterisks. 

MAIL TO: NEA Publications-Sales, 1201 Sixteenth 
Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. 



FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky College of Education. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscriptions service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
visual Materials. 

Baseball 

BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $1.00 

The All-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Washington. Stars of the American and 
National League are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are shown 
as the National League wins by a score of 7-3. 
BASEBALL ALI^STAR GAME OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $1.00 

Twenty-five all-stars from the American League 
defeat an equal number of National League greats by 
a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close-ups of the baseball 
stars of today and interesting plays of the game are 
shown in tiie fihn (KHSAA) 

BASEBALL FOR MILLION, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

In this film a colorful Big League Manager and 
an outstanding student of the game narrates play 
situations covering the official interpretation of a 
panorama of basic rules invovling batting, pitching, 
base running, and fielding. It is recommended for use 
by officails, coaches, players and fans. 
BASEBALL HALL OF FAME, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

This Aim shows the annual meeting at Coopers- 
town, New York, when new names are added to the 
Hall of Fame Mst. Numerous stars of the past return 
to the shrine each year at this time and are shown as 
their feats on the diamond are related. The history of 
Cooperstown and the purpose of the Hall of Fame are 
explained in the picture. 
BATTER UP, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (22 Min.) color $1.00 

Produced by National and American Leagues of 
Baseball. Shows the proper techniques of batting as 
demonstrated by hitting stars of the majors, Stan 
MusiccJ, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Ernie Banks, 
Will'p Mays and others. 
BATTING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and follow-through are clearly dem- 
onstrated in this film by professional players. 
THE BATTING STARS OF BASEBALL, s-c-a, 3 reels, 
$1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 

CATCHING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-e-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 

in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted 

ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. 

Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 

enable the viewer to follow each step or movement in 

each of the basic skills. 

CATCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$1.00 
This is a film designed to assist in the coaching 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



MT. STERLING — CLASS A, REGION 3, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Tim Hash, Bill Richardson, Alan Justice, Ronnie Eads. Allen McCahren, 
Johnny Ledford, Mason Kash, P. T. Sorrell, Jerry McCahren, Leonard Guy. Second Row: Gerald Hover- 
male. Chris Cropp, Mike Cooper. Groyer Carrington. Gas Prewitt. John McCulloueh, Sam Schafer, Tom 
Kennedy, Glenn Henderson. Third Row: Phillip Mann. Sam Foster, Donnie Parker. Ronnie Goldy, A. B. 
Givens, Phillip Fawns. Ronnie Clark. Donnie Martin, Ollie Oaklev. Fourth Row: Darwin Prewitt, Rick 
Downs. Fernando McCullough. Chuck Kidder, Jody Evans. Robert Owens. Tracy Shultz, Larry Brooks. 



of catchers but it is also interesting and entertaining. 
Correct methods and techniques of receiving, throwing, 
signahng and fielding are illustrated by Bill Dickey, 
Sherman Lollar. Yogi Berra and Roy Campanella. 
DEMOCRACY OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

The purpose of this film is for further development 
of young baseball players in our modern democracy 
and illustrates this through sports and sports competi- 
tion. This film includes a brief history of baseball 
along with a cavalcade of past and present stars. 
DOUBLE-PLAY KINGS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reel, 
$1.00 

This film presents an anlaysis of the double play 
in baseball. Different players from several major 
leagues are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, and 
throwing are illustrated and explained. 
HITTING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
follow accurately and graphically the basic funda- 
mentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, 
legs, hips, shoulders, arm, and head is explained. How 
to select a bat, how to hold it, and correct batting 
position are shown. 
INFIELD PLAY AT 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play 
at first and third base are illustrated by big league 
players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging runners, 
etc., pictured often in slow motion. Sponsored by A. G. 
Spalding Co.. The American and National Leagues. 
INSIDE BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, bat- 
ting, fielding, and base-running, are demonstrated. 
Note: This film was placed with the library through 
the courtesy of the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation. 
OFFICIAL BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00 

Informative and entertaining play situations used 
to depict official rules interpretations covering the 
phases of batting, pitching, base running, fielding and 
umpiring. Stiumulates interest and knowledge for 
fans, players, officials and baseball administrators. 
PITCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s c-a, 2 reels, 
$1.00 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Types 



of pitches and methods of practice are portrayed. 
PLAY BALL SON, j-s, IVa reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film showing a group of 
fourteen-year-old boys; who are experts in baseball. 
Correct method of hitting, catching, and throwing are 
demonstrated in natural and slow motion. Based on 
b3ok by Bert V. Dunne. 
STRIKE THREE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, $1.00 

Designed to train pitchers. The greatest pitchers in 
the game today show the pitching and fielding finesse 
that brought them fame. 
THROWING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing 
in baseball. Instructions are given for the overthrows, 
three-quarter side, side, and underhand throws. Coord- 
ination of foot and arm motion is stressed, as well as 
coordination of the body as a whole. 
TOUCHING ALL BASES, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing various American League stars playing 
their positions. It is also intended to give fans as a 
whole a better understanding and knowledge of the 
national pastime. The film shows Father Flanagan and 
his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame ceremonies in 
Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from night base- 
ball games. 

THE UMPIRE IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels. $1.00 
Summarizes importance the umpire to the base- 
ball game. Explanation of the duties of the umpire and 
also qualifications for job, showing where they receive 
their training. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Highlights of the game between the Cleveland In- 
dians and the New York Giants are shown in this film. 
The Giants, sparked by the sensational hitting of 
Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straight games. 
The Indians had set a record for the number of games 
won in winning the American League Pennant. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1955, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees are 
shown in this film. The commentary leading up to 
each game makes the film interesting as the Dodgers 
win the world championship. 



TEDS KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



Page Eleven 



FLEMING-NEON — CLASS A. REGION 4, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. David Fulton. Johnny Greene, Michael Hall, Bruce Quillen, Marshall 
Bevlns, Lesley Gray, Arlie Hall, Allen Bentley, Mgr. Rex Craft. Second Row: Jimmy Johnson, Kenneth 
Broome, Sam Quillen, Jr., Jesse Darrcll Wright, Larry Bentley, Johnny Bentley, Ninevah Yonts, Bobby 
Short. Third Row: Ass't Coach Arthur Adams, Gary Peake, Roy Yonts, Danny Pigman, Dennie Haymore, 
Harold Boiling, James Breeding, Jesse Spicer, Tommy Ryan Jimmy Harriston, Coach Raymond Isaacs. 

BOYLE COUNTY — CLASS A, REGION 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Victor Dclenay, Mike Belcher, Billy Johnson, Jerry Taylor, Eddie Enele, 
Harold Logue, Robby Pendygraft, W. C. Wilkerson. Second Row: Mike Tyler, Ed Sleet, Donnie Coffman, 
Ken Arnold, Enos Burkhart, Gary Best, Donnie Dever, Dennis Seltsam, David Cochran. Third Row: 
Steve Burkhart, Mike B. Belcher, Paul Southwood, Dwayne Holderman, Gary Ginter, Danny Cooper, 
Stewart Moss, John Young. Fourth Row: Mgr. Tom Gaines. Johnny Harmon, David Cundiff, Gary 
Hall, Jay Reynolds, Russell Young, Holman Cotton, Terry Webb, Mgr. Ralph Johnson. 



WORLD SERIES OF 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

The American League champion New York Yank- 
ees, carry the series the fuU seven games before 
bowing to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the 
National League. The film catches most of the hitting 
and shows the plays in which runs were scored in 
each game. The narrator, Lew Fonseca, describes the 
play and fiUs in the backgroimd with interesting bits 
of information concerning the game. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

The highlights of the six games played in the 
series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chi- 
cago White Sox are shown in this film. The Dodgers 
won the series by defeating the White Sox four games 
to two. Most of the scoring plays are filmed, along 
with many of the outstanding defensive plays. The 
color that goes with these games is captured in the 
film. 



WORLD SERIES OF 1960, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 Min.), 
color, $1.00 

Exciting moments of the seven games between the 
New York Yankees of the American League carried 
the series its full seven games before bowing to Na- 
tional League Pittsburg Bucs. Highlights of all seven 
games are shown and the action described. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1961, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 min.), 
color, $1.00 

Narrated by Mel AUen, this fihn shows the Cui- 
cinati Reds were able to win only the second game 
in the series against the New York Yankees. Superb 
pitching of Whitey Ford and batting power of the 
Yankees brought them the world's championship after 
five games. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1962, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Key plays from aU seven games are shown as the 
New York Yankees of the American League retain the 
world's championship by defeating the San Francisco 
Giants by the score of 1-0 in the final game. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1965 



Season's 
Greetings 



^he KUufde>n Qa4nfiJG4Uf> 



W. E. RINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 255-0837 



WORLD SERIES OF 1963, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 min.), 
color, $1.00 
Shows highlights of games in which the Los Angeles 
Dodgers won the baseball championship by defeating 
the New York Yankees in four straight games. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1964, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 min.), 
color, $1.00 
The St. Louis Cardinals toppped the New York 
Yankees in the first game, 9-5, and went on to win 
the series to become the world's champions for 1965. 
Covers all the exciting plays in the games. 

Golf 

SAVING STROKES WITH SAM SNEAD, s-c-a, 1 reel, 
$2.00 
Golf chamjnon Sam Snead illustrates his grip, his 
stance, his swing on each of several types of golf 
situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help to 
clarify the instruction. Shots and driver, brassie, and 
various irons for difficult lies are illustrated and finally 
his putting technique is shown. 



The Flying Dutchman 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

where that "hot shooting guard" who used 
to pour them in for Valley High settled as 
presented to him by David Reed. 

Harry Hardin, who won many honors as 
basketball star at Western Kentucky State 
College in the days of Peck Hickman, Bemis 
Lawrence and Hugh Poland, had another 



come his way this month when his Fairdale 
High School won the Abou Ben Adhem 
Award for the promotion of good practices 
during the football season. 

Up in Wisconsin Les Ansorge, the assis- 
tant director of the Wisconsin Inter-scholas- 
tic Athletic Association, has added some- 
thing new to his basketball clinics. At each 
meeting he engaged a coach to talk on the 
subject, "What a coach expects of an 
official." Send us the results of those 
speeches, Les, to pass on to your friends 
here in the Bluegrass State. It just occurred 
to me that you'd really have good cheese in 
Wisconsin if your cows could eat some of 
Kentucky's bluegrass. 

Irvine is a real sporty town. Earl Cox, 
who will soon be sports editor of one of the 
largest daily newspapers in the nation, calls 
Irvine his home and so does Charlie Hasten, 
sports announcer for WHAS-TV. Sid Meade 
supplied this information for the column. 

Please mail the news you want publish- 
ed to: The Flying Dutchman, Box 36, Jeffer- 
sontown, Kentucky. 




UTCLIFFE'S 



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ASKETBALI. 

E^iriPMEXT 




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RAWLINGS 


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SPALDING 


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SPALDING 


100 


Top Elite 


WILSON 


B 1200 


let 


WILSON 


B1210 


Comet 




TOURWAMENT XEEDS 

ORDER NOW 

RAWLINGS, SPALDING, OR WILSON BASKETBALL 

SCORE BOOKS - GOAL NETS - TROPHIES 

For Fast Service For In-Stock Merchandise 
Send Your Order To 

THE SUTCLIFFE COMPANY 



SCHOOL DIVISION 



INCORPORATED 

115 SOUTH 7TH ST, 



LOUISVILLE I. KENTUCKY 



HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

Phone CHapel 7- 1 94 1 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
CHRISTMAS - I 9 6 5 



Dear Customers and Friends: 

We at Hunt's want to take this time to thank you for 
the opportunity of serving you, given us through the 
past years. 

If in any way we have been successful in making your 
job as Coach, Principal or Athletic Director easier 
throughout the past year, then we feel that our efforts 
have not been in vain. 

We are at this Holiday Season reminding you that you 
have the very best wishes for the Happiest of Holidays 
from us at Hunt's and may 1966 bring good health and 
good fortune to all of you and yours. 

Very truly yours, 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

ED HENDLEY 
ROY BOYD 
JIM MITCHELL 
C. A. BYRN, JR. 
N. L. USREY 
ELIZABETH RULE 
DORIS MITCHELL 
EMILY BYRN 
H. S. BOMAR 
BILLY FARMER 
SONDRA POTTS 




CLASS AA STATE CHAMPION HOPKINSVILLE 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Bob BUkey, Gert Roholl. Howard Myers, Randall Grace, George 
Seay, Edwin Cliilton, Steve Holt, Steve Koon, Charles Gilbert, Tom Dorroh, Chris Brockman, Mike Haney, 
GeraM Thomas, Trainer Gary Ebling. Second Row: Mgr. James Halcomb, Dale PoUey, Eddie Marquess, 
Kenny Lee, Rodney Groom, Tommy Turner, Floyd Tumley, Joe McCollum, Bill Snider, Bobby Thorpe, 
Jackie Richardson, Stuart Coleman, Bruce Joiner. Third Row: Mike Hutchens, Albert Gray, Barker 
Davie, Ricky Deason, Mike Warren, Darrell Halcomb, Jesse Green, Happy Higgins, Branch Henard, 
John Fuqna, Dorris Trainer, Jim Hanratty, Steve Nunn, Mgr. Bruce Thornton. Fourth Row: Mickey 
Fowler, Richard Graham, Mike Lewis, Robert Tillman, Pete Moore, David Torian, Ben Fletcher, Tony 
Ricks, Hank Hayes, Charlie Peden, Rob Embry, Glenn Tillman, Ted Hayes, John Wright, Mike Brown. 



Hopkinsville 28-Hazard 7 
Hopkinsville 27-Paducah 7 
Hopkinsville 53-RussellviIle 
Hopkinsville 25-ClarksvilIe (Tenn.) 
Hopkinsville 33-Franklin-Simpson 



PLAYOFFS 



Hopkinsville 27-Madisanville 
Hopkinsville 12-Mayfield 
Hopkinsville 25-Caldwell County 6 
Hopkinsville 20-Murray 7 
Hopkinsville 39-Bowling Green 
Hopkinsville 25-Union County 



Hopkinsville 39-Henderson 6 
Hopkinsville 40-Harrison County 7 
Hopkinsville 24-Middlesboro 6 



Official Organ of tlie 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

January, 1966 



Conference Standings 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Cavema 8 

Austin-Tracy 7 10 

Gamaliel 4 4 

Temple Hill 3 5 

Park City 2 6 

Hiseville 2 6 

North Warren 2 6 

Big Eight Conference 

Henderson 5 

Owensboro 4 1 

Owensboro Cath. 2 2 

Daviess Count>' 1 3 

Union County 1 3 

Henderson Co. 4 



Clark County 
Franklin County 



Blue Grass Conference 

Berea 4 

Falmouth 3 1 

Burgin 1 2 

Sayre 1 2 

Mt. Vernon 4 



Henry Clay 

Frankfort 

Anderson 

Shelbyville 

Danville 

Madison 

Mt. Sterling 

Jessamine Co 

M. M. r. 

Stanford 

Paris 

Nicholas Co 

Garrard Co. 

Somerset 

Woodford Cl. 

Harrodsburg 

Georgetown 

Irvine 



Central Kentucky Conference 



30.00 
28.00 
23.00 
22.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
18.00 
18.00 
17.85 
15.00 
14.00 
13.33 
13.33 
12.86 
10.63 
10.55 
10.00 



Cumberland Vallev Conference 



Lynch 

Loyall 

Evarts 

Wallins 

Cumberland 

Hall 



Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 



Fleming Neon 

Belfry 

Pikeville 

Hazard 

Elkhom Cit>- 

Jenkins 

Whitesburg 

Wheelwright 

M. C. Napier 



Old Kentucky Home 

Bardstown 

Springfield 

Shepherdsville 

Lebanon 



Mid-Kentucky Conference 



Mid-State Conference 

Harrison County 4 

Bryan Station 2 1 

Bourbon Count.\ 2 2 



22.50 
18.75 
13.75 
12.50 
11.25 



North Central Kentucky Ccmference 



''Eminence 
''Oldham County 
Henry County 
Lincoln Inst. 
Carroll County 
Owen County 
'■'Co-champions 



22.50 
22.50 
14.00 
12.50 
12.50 
12.00 



Northeastern Kentucky Conference 



'■'Raceland 

''McKell 

Louisa 

Boyd County 

Russell 

Wurtland 

'^Co-champions 



Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Highlands 

Lloyd 

Holmes 

Dixie Heights 

Bellevue 

Campbell County 

Dayton 

Boone County 

Ludlow 

Newport 

Beechwood 



21.00 

20.00 

19.00 

18.125 

18.125 

17.222 

17.143 

15.00 

15.00 

14.285 

10.00 



South Kentucky Conference 

Franklin-Simpson 3 

Glasgow 2 10 

Bowling Green 12 

Russellvlile 3 

Southern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Glasgow 4 



Tompkins ville 


3 


1 







Campbellsville 


2 


2 







Greensburg 


1 


3 







Metcalfe County 





4 







Southeastern Kentucky 


Conference 


Middlesboro 


5 










London 


6 


1 







Pineville 


7 


2 







Williamsburg 


6 


2 







Kno.x Central 


5 


4 







Bell County 


3 


5 







Harlan 


2 


4 







Hazel Green 


1 


4 







Lynn Camp 


1 


5 


1 




Barbourville 





5 


1 




Corbin 





4 







Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 


Hopkinsville 


8 








23.75 


Murray 


8 


1 





21.66 


Mayfield 


5 


2 





20.00 


Trigg County 


7 


1 


1 


20.00 


Framklin-Simpson 


4 


3 





17.14 


Ft. Campbell 


6 


2 





16.87 


Madisonville 


2 


3 





16.00 


Paducah 


3 


3 





15.00 


Christian Co. 


2 


3 





14.00 


Russell ville 


2 


4 


1 


13.57 


Caldwell County 


2 


5 





12.85 


Bowling Green 


2 


5 





12.85 


Crittenden Co. 


2 


5 





12.85 


Fulton 


1 


4 





12.00 


Fulton County 


1 


5 





11.66 


Warren County 


1 


5 





11.66 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations for some of 
the early season situations which have been presented. 

Clifford B. Fagan 

1. Play: After the termination of the 
2nd quarter and during the half-time inter- 
mission, while: (a) the official is examin- 
ing the scorebook; or (b) walking to his 
dressing quarters; or (c) as he rttarns to 
the floor prior to the beginning of the 2nd 
half, coach of team A disrespectfully ad- 
dresses the official or attempts to influence 
the official's 2nd half decisions. 

Ruling: Technical foul. The 3rd quarter 
will start with the free-throw attempt which 
will be followed by a throw-in at the center 
of the court by a team B player. 

2. Play: Al commits a violation. Bl is 
awarded a throw-in at the designated spot. 

Ruling: Following a violation, the desig- 
nated spot is that at which the official 
hands the ball to the player to make the 
throw-in. The throw-in must be made from 
this designated spot. The player making 
the throw-in must have at least one foot on 
or over the designated spot. 

Comment: 1965-66 Case Book Play 30 
refers to a pivot situation only for the pur- 
pose of explaining the latitude permitted 
the player making the throw-in as it affects 
the position of his feet. The ball is dead 
and, therefore, the player making the throw- 
in cannot travel. The designated spot applies 
only longitudinally, that is, along the out 
of bounds line. It has no application as far 
as distance back from the boundary line is 
concerned. The designated spot has no 
heig'ht. It is permissible for a player making 
a throw-in to jump into the air and make 
the throw-in from the designated spot but 
above the floor level. 

3. Play: (a) Bl takes one step to his 
left using his right foot as a pivot foot and 
returns his left foot to the designated spot 
and steps to his right, using his left foot as 
a pivot foot during throw-in; or (b) Bl 
takes one step to his right with his left 
foot and then raises his right foot and re- 
leases the ball before his right foot again 
touches the floor. 

Ruling: Legal in (a). In (b) it is per- 



missible only if the right foot in this situa- 
tion is directly above the designated spot. 

4. Play: Team A scores a field goal. 
During the dead ball immediately following, 
time-out is granted either team A or team 
B. What throw-in privileges does team B 
have when play is resumed? 

Ruling: The time-out immediately fol- 
lowing the field goal does not affect the 
throw-in privileges. That is, team B is per- 
mitted to make the throw-in from any 
place out of bounds behind the end line. 

5. Play: Team A scores a field goal, mak- 
ing the score A-53, B-52. Team A has no re- 
maining charged time-outs. There are 5 
seconds left to play in the 4th period. Al 
reaches through the plane of the boundary 
and slaps the ball out of the hands of Bl 
who is holding the ball out of bounds. 

Ruling: Technical foul. This may appro- 
priately be designated either as delay of 
game or an unsportsmanlike act. 

6. Play: Al, closely guarded by Bl, in 
the mid-court, is consuming time by dribbl- 
ing. After the official's count of 2, Al drib- 
bles across the court to the other side in 
front of A2 who is guarded by B2. Bl and 
B2 switch opponents but keep Al and A 2 
continuously closely guarded. Al is still 
dribi^ling in the mid-court at the count of 5. 

Ruhng: Held ball between Al and B2. 
The "switch" by the defensive men in this 
situation is interpreted to have maintained 
close guarding. 

7. Play: Al, who is near the designated 
throw-in spot, refuses to accent the ball 
when official hands it to him. because Al 
or his teammates are not ready to put ihe 
ball in play. 

Ruling: The official should place the 
ball on the floor at the designated throw-in 
spot and begin a 5-second count. 

Comment: The act of handing the ball 
to the designated plavers does not always 
and does not necessarily include the plaver's 
acceptance of it. In a throw-in situation if 
the official off^^s t^^e ball to the nlayer. the 
official has fulfilled his oblio^ation. Cover- 
age is provided for the situation in which 
a player refuses to accent the hall. The com- 
( Continued on Page Eighteen) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



JANUARY, 1966 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 6 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication. Lexington, Ky. 40501 
, Second class postage paid at Lexingrton, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Kv. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Don Davis 
(1963-67). independence; Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse 
Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville; Gran C. Teatcr (1964-68). Paintsvillc. 
Subscription Rate Jl.OO Per Tear 

bnom the Commissionel s (Jffice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1965 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Approved and Certified Officials 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered officials 
qualified for tiie advanced rating of Approved and 
(i;ertified as a result of the National Federation bas- 
ketball examination which was given in Kentucky on 
December 6, 1965. The Approved rating does not carry 
forward from year to year, but must be earned each 
year. After an official has received the Certified rating, 
he keeps this rating provided that he attends the clinic 
for the current yeai' and worked in at least twelve 
first team high school basketball games during the 
previous year. Only officials receiving these higher 
ratings are eligible to work in the regional tourna- 
ments. Only Certified officials who are residents of 
Kentucky are eligible to work in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualifed for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 



CERTIFIED 

Alexander, Rex 

Allen, Lowry R. 

Allen, Nelson R. 

Baird, Bill 

Bell, Qarence T. 

Blackburn, Viley 0. 

Bowling, Roy 

Bradshaw, Bill 

Brizendine, Vic 

Brown. E. C. 

Brown, John W. "Scoop" 

Browning, Earl E. 

Bruner, Jack C. 

Buis, Nathaniel A. 

Canter, John 

Combs, F. D. 

Combs, Keith A. 

Conley, George 

Conley, Ted L. 

Conn, John D. 

Cooper. Warren 

Craft, Bill 

Crosthwaite, Joh'.i S., Jr. 

Cunningham. Julian R. 

Davis, Harold T. 

Davis, Ralph E. 

DeVary, Bill 

Dobson, Kenneth 

Dotson, John B. 

Drake, Richard R. 



OFFICIALS 

Driskell. Earl, Jr. 
Duerson, Wm. R. 
Duff, Earl 
Fades, James M. 
Edwards. Don A. 
Elrod, Wm. Turner 
Elliott, Carroll L. 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Finley, Ron 
Flynn, Bobby 
Faster, Bob 
Freese, Oliver T. 
Frifz, Sherman 
Fuller, John R., Jr. 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Gettler, John F. 
Gilbert, Gerald L. 
Goley, James E. 
Gos-ett, Jack 
Gour, Bob 
Green, Walt 
Gumm, Kenneth E. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Hagan, Joe 
Hammons, Norman 
Harned, Victor C. 
Harrell, Bill D. 
Ha.ynes, John 
Heldman. John, Jr. 
Hewitt, R. T. 



Hill, Earl F. 


Powell, Logan 


Hofstetter, Joe 


Prather, Wilbur E. 


Howard, Carl 


Radiunas, Stan 


Kmley, Neil P. 


Rawlings, Harold 


Huter, Jim 


Reed, Charles R. 


Hyatt, Bob 


Reed, Gordon 


Inman, Briscoe 


Reinhardt. Myron 


Irwin, Charles R. 


Reschar, John V., S 


Jenkins, James 


Rexroat, Jerry L. 


Jenkins, Kean 


Ricketfs, C. 0. 


Johnson, James M. 


Ring. William H. 


Johnson, Wm. Bernard 


Ritter. Goebel 


Johnson, Walter 


Rogers, Howard 


Kimmel, Jerry 


Roller, Otis 


King, Jim 


Ro'hfuss, Dick 


Kinnc. P. J. 


Rubarts, Leland G. 


Kiight, Bill 


Russell. Allen W. 


Laubheimer, Donald T. 


St, Clair, Robert L., 


Lee, Robert L. 


Sanders, Mel 


Long, Bill 


Schlich, Paul E. 


Louden, Hubert 


Selvy, Curt 


Loudy, Kenneth 


Settle, Roy G. 


Lowe, Gene T. 


Shaw. Earl 


Lucas, Gene 


Small, BiU 


Lytic, Wm. Pr;ce 


Smith, Edgar J. 


McAnelly, David 


Smith, Wayne N. 


McClure, W. S. 


Smith, Wyatt Jack 


McCoy, Hayse 


Snrth, Willard N. 


McGehee, G. K. 


Sosh. LaRue 


McLane, Albert I. 


Sped:, Michael E. 


McLeod, Robert N. 


Spencer, Irvin E. 


McPike, Ray S., Jr. 


Steenken, William R 


Mahan, Carle 


Stephenson, Harry S. 


Maines, George 


S iff. Maurice 


May. E. B., Jr., 


Sti';eleather, Clyde L 


Meade, Foster "Sid" 


Stines. Ray A. 


Meredith, Denny 


Stith, Houston 


Metcalf, Earl L. 


Strain, Richard 


Meyer, Bud 


Strong. Amett 


Miller, Bob 


Sullivan, Don C. 


Miller, Ferrel 


Tarlton, Thomas 0. 


Miller, Rex J. 


Taylor. Ed 


Miller, Roy J. 


Thompson, Jack 


Mitchell, Billy N. 


Thompson. Ralph 


Moore, Robert 


Tinsley, Marion F. 


Moore, Roy 


Tucker, Neal R. 


Morse, Richard K. 


Varble. William 


Moser, Rudy C. 


Vettiner, Charlie 


Mudd. Ed 


Weaver. Ray 


Nau, Bill 


Wells, Milford 


Neal, Gene 


Wesche, James A. 


Nevil, Vernon E. 


White, David B. 


Newton, C. M. 


Williams, Roger 


Nixon, James W. 


Willis, Robert A. 


Nord, Ed 


Winchester, Roy L. 


Padgett, R. K. 


Winfrey. Shelby 


Peay, Curtis 


Wise, Billy V. 


Pergrem, Bernard 


Wise. Jack 


Perry, James E. 


Woods, Gene 


Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 


Wurtz, Emil 


Points, Charles 




APPROVED OFFICIALS 



Blevins, Boone, Jr. 
Brashear. Loy R. 
Butcher, Douglas 
Butcher, Granville ' 
Butner, Billy M. 
Carlberg, John H. 
Carney. Robert L. 
Cisco. Robert N. 
Clemmons, Sam 
Coleman. Daniel L. 
Collins. Hubert 



Cooteey. Marvin 
Cox, Alva J. 
Crager. Bobby F. 
Croft. Lewis E. 
Daniel. Roger T. 
De'Csnte. Arthur J. 
Disken, James W. 
Dorse.v. James A. 
Durbin. Hade, Jr. 
Duvall, Thomas J., 
Farish. Merlin J. 



Sr. 



(Continued on Page Thirteen) 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Page Tliree 



1965-66 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
School Address Tel. No. Principal Coach 

REGION 1 



D. 1 Carlisle County 


R. 3, BardweU 




0. J. Mitchell 


Tom M. AdWns 


Fulton 


Fulton 


472-1741 


J. M. Martin 


Carson Coleman 


Fulton County 


Route 4, Hickman 


236-3168 


Harold Garrison 


Dale Alexander 


Hickman County 


Clinton 


653-5461 


James H. Phillips 


Faurest Coogle 


Riverview 


R. 1, Hickman 


236-2070 


P. L. Nichols 


Maurice Tucker 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


Barlow 


665-5151 


Robert G. Fiser 


Berny Miller 


Heath 


R. 1, W. Paducah 


488-1345 


Don Stephenson 


Frank Wright 


Lone Oak 


Paducah 


444-5542 


John Robinson 


Jack McKinney 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


443-6296 


Bradford D. Mutchler 


Barney Thweatt 


Reidland 


R. 8, Paducah 


898-2441 


Richard L. Winebarger 


Billy Brown 


St. Maiy 


Paducah 


442-1681 


Br. H. Ignatius FSC 


Jim Voight 


D. 3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


382-3400 


Joe McPherson 


Rex Smith 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


623-4349 


Sr. Helen Constance 


Bob McCord 


Farmington 


Farmington 


345-2171 


C. W. Jones 


Bill Owen 


Lowes 


Lowes 


674-5333 


W. W. Chumbler 


Scott Schlosser 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


247-4461 


Barkley Jones 


Don Sharks 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


328-3241 


James A. Pickard 


Ken Wray 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


851-3231 


Cecil Reid 


Jerald Ellington 


Wingo 


Wingo 




Howard V. Reid 


Dennis Gourley 


D. 4 Benton 


Benton 


527-2511 


J. Delton Dodds 


Joe Warren 


Calloway County 


Murray 


753-5479 


William B. MiUer 


Roy Co+hran 


Murray 


Murray 




Eli Alexander 


Bobby Toon 


Murray College 


Murray 


762-3824 


Vernon E. Shown 


Garrett Beshear 


North Marshall 


Calvert aty 


395-4400 


Robert Goheen 


Thomas E. Poe 


South Marsiiall 


R. 1, Benton 


527-2891 


Joe C. Nail 


William A. Cothran 






REGION 2 




D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


365-2635 


WilUam F. Brown 


Harold C. Jone.s 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


9654226 


Ercel Little 


L. B. Gaston 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


545-3431 


Odell Walker 


Gerald Tabor 


Livingston Central 


Burna 


988-3263 


Kenneth T. Hardto 


William Martin 


Lyon County 


E-iHvville 


388-2296 


John E. Floyd 


Louis Cunninghan: 


Trigg Coimty 


Cadiz 


522-6653 


John W. Randolph 


Duke Burnett 


D. 6 Henderson 


Henderson 


VA 6-9568 


William B. Posey 


James Smith 


Henderson County 


Henderson 


826-9056 


J. W. Duncan 


Donald Gish 


Holy Name 


Henderson 


VA 7-9297 


Sr. Louis Joseph 


James K. Lindenlserg 


Providence 


Providence 


MO 7-2411 


George Wooton 


Jackie Winders 


St. Vincent Acad. 


St. Vincent 


568-2611 


Sr. Raymunda 


Ben Finley 


Union County 


R. 2, Morganfield 


389-1454 


H'Eari Evans 


Earl Adkins 


Webster County 


Dixon 


639-2651 


Ivan Russell 


Jude Talbott 


D. 7 Earlington 


Earlington 


383-5511 


Robert B. Fox 


Robert B. Fox 


MadisonviUe 


MadisonviUe 


821-2824 


William F. Murray 


Pete Waldrop 


Rosenwald 


MadisonviUe 


821-5044 


Caldwell Smith, Sr. 


James Henry 


South Hopkins 


R. 1, NortonvUle 


676-3443 


David Siria 


James Besheai's 


West Hopkins 


R. 1, Nebo 


249-3151 


A. 0. Richards 


Gary Morgan 


D S Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


885-8278 


Frank B. Simpson 


WiUiam M. Falls. Sr. 


Christian County 


Hopkinsville 


886-4463 


Neal R. Tucker 


Harlan Peden 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


SW 7-3811 


B'U Outland 


Jerry Gamble 


Fort Campbell 


Fort Camnbell 


798-2645 


Bill R. Perry 


Tom Morgan 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


886-3384 


Chester C. Redmon 


Gene Mason 


Todd County Central 


Elkton 


265-2506 
REGION 


Robert N. Bush 
3 


Harold Ross 


D. 9 Calhoun 


Calhoun 


273-3264 


L. D. Knight 


Don Parson 


Daviess County 


R. 2. Owensboro 


684-5'?85 


W. P. Wheeler 


Charles Combs 


Livermore 


Livermore 


278-2522 


Kenneth Middleton 


Carl C. Ashby 


Owensboro 


Owensboro 


683-1016 


Joe 0. Brown 


Bobby Watson 


Owensboro Catholic 


Owensboro 


684-3215 


Rev. Henry O'Bryan 


Homer Bickers 


Sacramento 


Sacramento 




Donald R. Hayes 


Douglas Walsh 


St. Mary's 


Whitesville 


233-4196 


Sr. Robert Mary 


Bryce Roberts 


D. 10 Bremen 


Bremen 


525-3411 


Paul Phillips 


Randy Swan 


Central City 


Central Qty 


754-2272 


Debnas Gish 


Jackie Day 


Drakesboro 


Drakesboro 


476-2630 


W. J. Wilcutt 


James Hill 


Graham 


Graham 


338-1317 


Cecil Calvert 


Kenneth Galyen 


Greenville 


Greenville 


502-4650 


J. Ernest Atkins 


W. Darvis Snodgrass 


Hughes Kirk 


Beechmont 




Charles Fades 


Tomy Lyons 


Muhlenberg Central 


Powderly 


338-3550 


Lyle C. Baugh 


Bob Revo 



Page Four 


TH 


E KENTUC 


KY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETK FOR JANUARY, 1966 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


D. 11 Breckinridge County 


Harned 


758-2149 


W. 0. Jackson 


Donald R. Morris 


Flaherty 


R. 3, Vine Grove 


828-6625 


H. W. Hunt 


Wally Johnson 


Fordsville 


Fordsville 




Noble Midkiff 


CarroU Harrison 


Frederick Fraize 


Cloverport 


788-33»S 


V. M. Vibbert 


T. E. Belcher 


Hancock County 


Lewisport 


927-2531 


Clifton Banks, Jr. 


Denzel Mefford 


Meade Countj- 


Brandenburg 


422-3214 


Stuart Pepper 


James Lambert 


Ohio County 


Hartford 


BR 4-3366 


Shelby C. Forsythe, Jr. 


Ralph Underbill 


D. 12 Butler Count\ 


Morgantown 


526-3753 


Darrell C. Hampton 


W. O. Warren, Jr. 


Caneyv'ille 


Caneyville 


879-4211 


Ramon Majors 


Bin Lee 


Clarkson 


Clarkson 


242-3061 


Thomas E. Cunningham 


Bowman Davenport 


Edmonson County 


Brownsville 


597-2932 


John M. Lane 


Dan King 


Grayson County Cath. 


R. 2, Leitchfield 


242-4848 


Sr. Jamesina 


Donald Hawkins 


Leitchfield 


Leitchfield 


259-4175 


John H. Taylor 


Bobby Bland 






REGION 4 




D. 13 Adairville 


Adairville 


539-7711 


Jesse L. Richards 


Ralph Townsend 


Auburn 


Auburn 


5424181 


Jim Young 


Howard Gorrell 


Chandler's Chapel 


R. 2. Auburn 


542-6492 


Morris Shelton 


Thomas D. Garrett 


Lewisburg 


Lewisburg 


755-6191 


J. M. Vance 


Bob Birdwhistell 


Olmstead 


Olmstead 


724-4621 


W. N. Alexander 


James Milam 


Russellville 


Russellville 


726-6434 


R. D. Reynolds 


John McCarley 


D. 14 Alvaton 


Alvaton 


843-8067 


Robert Morgan 


Dallas Embry 


Bowling Green 


Bowling Green 


842-1674 


Raymond H. Herndon 


Larry Doughty 


Bristow 


R. 1, Bowling Green 842-1960 


Kenneth Harvey 


Lowell Hammers 


College 


Bowling Green 


842-0341 


James A. Carpenter 


R. Douglas Smith 


Franklin-Simpson 


Franklin 


5864763 


Ronald W. Qark 


John Price 


North Warren 


Smiths Grove 


563-2041 


Aaron Turner 


Ron Chumbley 


Richardsville 


Richardsville 




Gilbert Richardson 


Don Webb 


Warren Count>' 


Bowling Green 


842-7302 


Claudius H. Harris 


Andrew Renick 


D. 15 Allen County 


Scottsville 


237-3841 


T. C. Simmons 


James Bazzell 


Austin-Tracy 


Austin 


434-8911 


Kenneth B. Sidwell 


Charles Day 


Glasgow 


Glasgow 


651-2256 


Earl Bradford 


Jim Riohards 


Hiseville 


Hiseville 


453-2611 


F. P. Newberry 


Bob Sturgeon 


Park City 


Park aty 


749-2665 


Jewell Colliver 


Darrell Florence 


Scottsville 


Scottsville 


237-3751 


Bruce Stewart 


Lyle Dunbar 


Temple ffill 


R. 4, Glasgow 


427-2611 


David Montgomery 


Roy Withrow 


D. 16 Clinton County 


Albany 


387-2891 


Perry C. Hay 


Lindle Castle 


Cumberland Count.\- 


Burkesville 


864-3451 


Samuel L. Smith 


Larry McDonald 


Gamaliel 


Gamaliel 


457-2341 


Edwin Steen 


Bobby Burres 


Metcalfe Count\ 


Edmonton 


432-2461 


Norman Antle 


Cortez Butler 


Tompkinsville 


Tompkinsville 


487-6217 


Randall Grider 


Prentice Stanford 






REGION 5 




D. 17 East Hardin 


Glendale 


854-2300 


Damon Ray 


Donald Cothran 


Elizabethtown 


Elizabethtown 


765-5237 


Paul E. Kerrjck 


Charles Rawlings 


Elizabethtown Catb. 


Elizabethtown 


765-5207 


Sr. Anton 


Hardin McLane 


Fort Knox 


Ft. Knox 


4-''019 


Howard Downing 


Bob Burrow 


North Hardin 


Vine Grove 


877-2210 


James T. Alton 


Leon Braddock 


West Hardin 


Stephensburg 


862-1979 


Kenneth Riddle 


Bill Johnson 


D. 18. Caverna 


Horse Cave 


773-7951 


Wilbur Smith 


Ralph Dorsey 


Cub Run 


Cub Run 


524-2925 


Wandel D. Strange 


Kenneth Metcalf 


LaRue County 


Hodgenville 


358-3195 


Everett G. Sanders 


Corky Cox 


Memorial 


Hardyville 


528-2271 


Glen 0. Barrett 


Reathel Goff 


Munfordville 


Munfordville 


5244651 


H. D. Puckett 


Ray Hammers 


D. 19. Bardstown 


Bardstown 


348-5913 


John H. Branson 


Gamis Martin 


Bloomfield 


Bloomfield 


252-2311 


J. B Sparks 


■•^TP.it Rijbv 


Fredericktown 


R. 2, Springfield 


284-5417 


Sr. Charles Asa 


Dudley R. Thompson 


Mackville 


MackviUe 


262-5566 


Robert Drury 


Jesse Purdy 


Old Kentucky Honu 


Bardstown 


348-8473 


T. G. Florence 


Joe Holcom'b 


St. Catherine 


New Haven 


549-3143 


Sr. Mary Catherine 


M'chael PoUio 


St. Joseph Prep. 


Bardstown 


348-3989 


Bro. Howard, CFX 


ayde E. Smith 


Springfield 


Springfield 


336-3718 


Garland Creech 


William Yankey 


Willisburg 


Willisburg 


375-2217 


Z. T. Lester 


Monty Singleton 


D. 20 Adair County 


Columbia 


384-2751 


Brooks Coomer 


John Burr 


Campbellsvilie 


Campbellsvilie 


465-8774 


Richard L. Bower 


Don Shaw 


Greensburg 


Greensburg 


932-5731 


Eugene E. Tate 


Carl Deaton 


Lebanon 


Lebanon 


692-3441 


Raymond H. Brawner 


Hubert Edwards 


St. Augustine 


Lebanon 


692-2053 


Sr. Edward Maiy 


James W. Thompson 


St. Charles 


R. 2. Lebanon 


69''4578 


Sr. Charles Marie 


Don I^Tart^in 


St. Francis 


Loretto 


865-2301 


Sr. Cordelia 


Sam B. Thomas 


Taylor County 


Campbellsvilie 


4654431 


E. L. Cox 


Billy B. Smith 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SO 


IGGL ATHLETE FC 


)R JANUAI 


lY, 1966 


Page Five 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 








REGION 6 




D. 


21 Bishop David 


Louisville 


447-3442 


Bro. Richard Reaumo 


Jerry Armstrong 




Butler 


Louisville 


EM 3-2628 


Herbert Hatfield 


Warren Lowe 




Loretto 


Louisville 


778-2122 


Sr. Ann Francis 


Jean Daugherty 




Pleasure Ridge Park 


Louisville 


921-9230 


Bobby Green 


Gary Schaffer 




Valley 


VaHey Station 


937-2300 


J. C. Cantrell 


Bobby Pace 




Western 


Shively 


417-3221 


John D. Brown 


Jerry Rexroat 


D. 


22 Ahrens 


Louisville 


583-9711 


Alfred H. Meyer 


Charles Perry 




Central 


Louisville 


584-6355 


J. Waymon Hackett 


Robert Graves 




Flaget 


Louisville 


778-9000 


Bro. Hilaire, CFX 


Tom Finnegan 




Shawnee 


Louisville 


774-2353 


Robert B. Gem 


John C. Armstrong 


D. 


23 DeSales 


Louisville 


36S-6519 


Rev. Fr. Murray 


James Huter 




Fairdale 


Fairdale EM 6-1468 


Harry K. Hardin 


Clyde Copley 




Holy Rosary Acad. 


Louisville 


361-2213 


Sr. Francine, O.P. 


Wanita Wolfe 




Iroquois 


Louisville 


366-0396 


Edwin K. Binford 


Jadie R. Frazier 




Southern 


Louisville 


969-1331 


T. T. Knight 


William Kidd 




Thomas Jefferson 


Louisville 


969-3271 


W. D. Bruce 


Larry Castle 








REGION 7 




□. 


25 Lady of Mercy Acad. 


Louisville 


584-5589 


Sr. Mary Joachim, RSM 


Kenwyn Boyle 




duPont Manual 


Louisville 


636-1441 


A. J. Ries 


Lou Tsioropoulos 




Ky. Sch. for the Blind 


Louisville 


897-1583 


William E. Davis 






Louisville Coun. Day 


Louisville 


895-3452 


Patrick T. Boardman 


Kenneth Goldsmith 




Louisville Male 


Louisville 


582-2613 


Foster J. Sanders 


John Rendek 




Presentation Acad. 


Louisville 


583-5935 


Sr. Thomas Mary 






Trinity 


Louisville 


895-9427 


Rev. Alfred N. Steinhause 


V W. C. Sergeant 




Ursuline Academy 


Louisville 


5S7-1717 


Mother M. Lolumba 


Joyce Andriot 


D. 


26 Angela Merici 


Louisville 


447-5911 


Sr. Mary Carmel, OSU 


Marian A. Yates 




Aquinas 


Louisville 


895-9411 


Malachy F. Cle&ry 


John Hamilton 




Eastern 


IVtiddletown 


245-4161 


John W. Trapp 


Bill Hoke 




Ky. H. School for Girls Louisville 


452-2163 


Mrs. Alwyn Dickerson 






Ky. Military Inst. 


Lyndon 


425-7901 


N. C. Hodgin 


Lowell R. Watson 




Sacred Heart Acad. 


Louisville 


897-1811 


Sr. George Marie 






Seneca 


Louisville 


451-4330 


K. B. Farmer 


Tom Ash 




Waggener 


Louisville 


895-0567 


Earl S. Duncan 


Roy Adams 




Westport 


Louisville 


425-2541 


V. M. Brucchieri 


Harold Andrews 


D. 


27 Atherton 


Louisville 


459-3610 


RusseU Garth 


Eugene Minton 




Durrett 


Louisville 


368-5831 


James C. Bruce 


Howard Stacey 




Fern Creek 


Fern Creek 


239-3267 


W. K. Niman 


Bill Carrithers 




Louisville Col. School 


Louisville 


451-5330 


Frances H. Reese 






St. Xavier 


Louisville 


636-2525 


Bro. Conrad, CFX 


Joe Reibel 








REGION 8 


' 


D. 


29 Lebanon Junction 


Lebanon Junction 


833-4626 


George E. Veilentine 


Glen Smith 




Mt. Washington 


Mt. Washington 


5384227 


C. L. Francis 


L. W. Mullins 




St. Aloysius 


Shepherdsville 


543-6721 


Sr. M. Joyce 


Fr. J. Fowler 




ShepherdsviHe 


ShepherdsviUe 


543-7614 


Frank R. Hatfield 


Tom Collins 




Taylorsville 


Taylorsville 


477-2230 


Harvey G. Bush 


Larry Cheek 


D. 


30 Eminence 


Eminence 


845-4071 


Cletus L. Hubbs 


Qetus L. Hubbs 




Henry County 


New Castle 


346-8421 


James B. Edwards 


Don Turner 




Lincoln Institute 


Lincoln Ridge 


722-8863 


Whitney M. Young 


Samuel Moore 




Shelby County 


ShelbyviUe 


633-2344 


Bruce Sweeney 


Bill Harrell 




Shelbyville 


Shelbyville 


6334877 


Vincent Zachem 


E>an Settle 


D. 


31 Carroll County 


Carrollton 


732-5215 


WiUiam L. MiUs 


Jack Williams 




Gallatin County 


Warsaw 


567-5041 


W. L. Holloway 


James Gainey 




Oldham County 


LaGrange 


2414458 


A. L. Roberts 


Ray Warmath 




Trimble County 


Bedford 


255-3268 


Clyde Cropper 


Bruce Springate 


D. 


32 Georgetown 


Georgetown 


70 


Cardin Carmack 


George Lusby 




Grant County 


Dry Ridge 


824-5001 


Ralph Blakey 


Carl Wenderoth 




Owen County 


Owenton 


484-5509 


Cyrus E. Greene 


Ken Martin 




Scott County 


R. .5, Georgetown 


635 


William D. Smart 


John Crigler 




William stown 


Williamstown 


824-5771 


Opp Bussell, Jr. 


Robert Osborne 



Page Six 


TH 


E KENTUC 


"KY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLE 


TE FOR JANUARY. 1966 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 






REGION 9 




D. 33 Boone County 


Florence 


282-2223 


Edwin H. Walton 


Richard Longbons 


Dixie Heights 


So. Ft. Mitchell 


341-7650 


Arthur J. Walsh 


Roy McKenney 


Uoyd 


Erlanger 


341-7530 


Robert M. Gschwind 


Donald E. Wilmhoff 


St. Henry 


Erianger 


341-9309 


Sr. Joseph Marie, OSB 


William Code 


Simon Kenton 


Independence 


356-3541 


George Edmondson 


Shirlie Elliott 


Walton-Verona 


Walton 


485-4293 


John B. Shoemaker 


Lando Lockard 


D. 34 Beeciiwood 


So. Ft. MitcheU 


331-1220 


Thehna W. Jones 


David Van Deren 


Coxdngton Catholic 


Covington 


431-5351 


Bro. Donald McKee, SM 


"Mote" Hils 


Holmes 


Covington 


431-3604 


H. B. Tudor 


Tom Ellis 


Holy Cross 


Covington 


431-3317 


Sr. M. aarita, OSB 


George N. Schneider 


Ludlow 


Ludlow 


261-8211 


Arthur T. Tipton 


Robert Jones 


Notre Dame Acad. 


Covington 


2614300 


Sr. Mary Honora, SND 




VUla Madonna Acad. 


Covington 


261-3441 


Sr. Mary Judith 




D. 35 Bellevue 


Bellevue 


261-2980 


Ross Mills, Jr. 


Lynn Stewart 


Dayton 


Dayton 


2614357 


W. D. Sporing 


Frank Lyons 


NewTxirt 


Newport 


261-2860 


Edwin K. Burton 


Stanley Amzen 


Newport Catholic 


Newport 


441-7100 


Bro. Julian Mark, FSC 


James R. Connor 


D. 36 Bishop Brossart 


Alexandria 


635-9166 


Rev. Joseph W. Minogue 


Donald Fangman 


Campbell County 


Alexandria 


694-6112 


Edward E. Ball 


Lawrence Kinney 


Highlands 


Ft. Thomas 


441-1301 


Harold Miller 


Robert Luecke 


St. Thomas 


Ft. Thomas 


441-2211 


Sr. Eli2abeth Marie 


Kenneth Shields 


Sih'er Grove 


Silver Grove 


441-3873 


Robert F. Dozier 


Charles F. Doll, Jr. 






REGION 10 




D. 37 Bourbon County 


Paris 


987-2550 


Joe E. Sabel 


Fred Creasey 


Harrison Countj- 


Cynthiana 


234-2911 


Clifford Lowdenback 


Charles Sutherland 


Millersburg M. Inst. 


Millersburg 


484-3352 


W. D. Haynes 


John F^essley 


Nicholas County 


Carlisle 


477 


Robert Barlow 


Don R. Burton 


Paris 


Paris 


987-4545 


Lawrence M. Stamper 


Earl Redwine 


D. 38 Augusta 


Augusta 


756-4282 


Alice Kate Field 


Larry Stephenson 


Bracken County 


Brooksville 


735-3891 


Jarvis Parsley 


Jarvis Parsley 


Deming 


Mt. Olivet 


724-2700 


H. 0. Hale 


Billy Anderson 


Falniouth 


Falmouth 


654-3316 


Maurice B. McGlone 


Robert P. Atkinson 


Pendleton 


Falmouth 


654-3355 


Terry Cummins 


PhiUip Wood 


D. 39 Fleming Co. 


Flemingsburg 


845-6601 


Martin Marlar 


Joe Simons 


Lewis County 


Vanceburg 


796-5441 


Teddy Appplegate 


Donnie Gaunce 


Mason Countj 


R. 1. Maysville 


564-6409 


Elza Whalen, Jr. 


Herb Childers 


MaysviUe 


Maysville 


564-3856 


OrviUe B. Hayes 


Larry Wood 


St. Patrick 


Maysville 


564-5329 


Sr. M. Robert 


George W. Foreman 


Tollesboro 


Tollesboro 


798-2541 


Charles M. Hughes 


Alan Bane 


D. 40 George Rogers Clark 


Winchester 


744-Slll 


Letcher W. Norton 


Lewis Snowden 


Montgomerj Count\ 


Mt. Sterlinc 


266 


Calvin Hunt 


J. R. Cunningham 


Ml. Sterling 


Mt. Sterling 


956 


James McAfee 


James McAfee 


SI. Agatha Acad. 


Winchester 


744-6484 


Sr. Caroline Mary 


James H. Fanning 






REGION 11 




D. 41 Frankfort 


Frankfort 


223-8030 


Lee T. Mills 


Jack Black 


Franklin Count\ 


Frankfort 


223-8248 


Elmer C. Moore 


John Lykins 


Good Shepherd 


Frankfort 


227-923- 


Sr. Mary Petronilla 


Charles Furr 


M'oodford County 


Versailles 


873-5434 


Charles 0. Dawson 


Edward AUin 


D. 42 Anderson 


Lawrenceburg 


839-3431 


Henry Frazier 


Jack Upchurch 


Burgin 


Burgin 


748-5170 


Jack D. Johnson 


David Feeback 


Harrodsburg 


Harrodsburg 


734-3242 


Tebay Rose 


Jerry Gray 


Jessamine Countj 


R. 1, Nicholasville 88.5-4849 


Billy Lockridge 


Billy Chase 


Mercer County 


Harrodsburg 


734-4195 


Zeb Blankenship 


Tilden Deskins 


Western 


R. 1, Sinai 


9-4855 


Robert B. Turner 


Wiley Brown 


D. 43 Bryan Station 


Lexington 


299-4027 


R. L. Grider 


Robert Abney 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


252-5565 


Clyde T. Lassiter 


M Prewitt 


Lafayette 


Lexington 


277-5430 


J. L. Smith 


Adolph Rupp, Jr. 


Lexington Catholic 


Lexington 


277-4775 


Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 


Harry T. Starnes 


P. L. Dunbar 


Lexington 


252-0640 


P. L. Guthrie 


Louis Stout 


Sayre 


Lexington 


255-5780 


Dorm HoUingsworth 


Daniel H. Hill 


Tates Creek 


Lexington 


266-0115 


A. C. Thomas 


Richard Jones 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


986-3521 


L. R. Singleton 


Darrell Bicknell 


Estill Countj 


Irvine 


723-3537 


Luther Patrick 


James Kiser 


Foundation 


Berea 


986-4911 


Roy N. Walters 


Lester B. Abbott 


Irvine 


Irvine 


723-3616 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison 


Richmond 


6234959 


Patrick E. Napier 


Ray VenciU 


Madison Central 


Richmond 


623-1530 


James B. Moore 


Don Richardson 


Model 


Richmond 


623-7450 


Walter Marcum 


Shirley Keams 



THE KENTUCKY mOH SO 


TOOL ATHLETE I 


^OR JANUA 


RY, 1966 


Page Seven 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 






REGION 12 




D. 45 Boyle County 


Danville 


236-5447 


Roy R. Camic 


Dickie Parsons 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


355-2541 


James Ledford, Jr. 


Doug Pendygraft 


Danville 


DanviUe 


236-6373 


Don R. Rawiings 


David Cottrell 


Garrard County 


Lancaster 


792-2146 


Johnnie Ray LasweU 


Dale Moare 


HustonviUe 


HustonviUe 


346-3831 


Cecil Purdom 


.Albert Wall 


Ky. School for the Deal Danville 


236-5132 


Robert T. Baughman 


James D. Morrison 


McKinney 


McKinney 


346-2942 


M. C. Montgomery 


Mike Candler 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


365-7018 


Lester M. Mullins 


Jim Reynolds 


Stanford 


Stanford 


365-2191 


Norman McGuffey 


Dienzel Dennis 


D. 46 Casey County 


R. 4, Liberty 


787-6151 


Nathaniel Buis 


Charles Kinney 


Liberty 


Liberty 


787-6951 


Stanley E. Bryant 


Bob Payne 


Monticello 


Moniicello 


348-4681 


Eldoi E. Davidsan 


Jae W. Harper 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


866-2545 


Vertis E. Tarter 


Allen Feldhaus 


Wayne County 


MonticeUo 


348-3311 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Gerald Sinclair 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 


5614250 


CoUas L. Simpson 


Oscar L. Fitzgerald 


Eubank 


Eubank 


379-4661 


J. B. Albright 


Gilbert Gaddis 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


678-5229 


Bob R. Overbly 


Samuel L. Cowan 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


376-2213 


W. Norris Manning 


I andon Sexton 


Nancy 


Nancy 


678-4942 


Bobby G. Sullivan 


Garvis Burkett 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


354-2511 


L. M. Stephens 


Danny Trent 


Pulaski 


Somerset 


679-1574 


Murrell P. Stewart 


Bll Mauney 


Shopville 


Shopville 


274-3181 


Hobert R. Thompson 


Hulen Wilson 


Somerset 


Somerset 




W. B. Jones 


Doug Hines 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


864-2331 


C. Frank Bentley 


Joe Gregory 


Hazel Green 


E-'st Bernstadt 


84'^-2i35 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Noel Karr 


Lily 


Lily 


8644330 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


864-2181 


Leighton Watkins 


Roy Gene Woolum 






REGION 13 




D. 49 Annville 


AnnvUle 


364-2721 


Jason Kuipers 


Jerry Hacker 


Brodhead 


Brodhead 




D. A. Robbins 


Billy Riddle 


Clay County 


Manchester 


598-3737 


Robert Campbell 


Henry Garrison 


Livingston 


Livingston 


453-2121 


Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


McKee 


McKee 


287-2631 


Herman Brockman 


Wade Evans 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


256-2953 


Cleston Saylor 


Jack L. Laswell 


Oneida 


Oneida 


847-2202 


Harold Holderman 


Winston Kilgore 


Tyner 


Tyner 


364-3170 


James W. Wilson 


R. B. Morris 


D. 50 Barbourville 


Barbourville 


54S-31''9 


Charles Singleton 


H. D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


528-3902 


D. P. Parsley 


Bill Smith 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


546-4136 


Clinton B. Hammons 


Donald Bingham 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


528-5429 


P. M. Broughton 


Alton Taylor 


Whitley County 


Williamsburg 


6915 


Warren Peace 


Clyde E. HiU 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


65O0 


James L. Davis. Jr. 


/.'-n LpForce 


D. 51 Bell County 


FtoevUle 


337-2329 


James A. PursifuU 


Willie Hendrjckson 


Henderson Settlement 


Frakes 


337-3618 


Herby J. Roark 


Wayland Jones 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


337-2435 


Chester L. aick 


G. B. Hendrickson 


Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


248-1000 


Shelvie Fuson 


Darell Storm 


PineviUe 


PineviUe 


337-2439 


Effie Arnett 


John Brock 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


337-3300 


W. L. Knuckles, Jr. 


Don Fedderson 


D. 52 Cumberland 


Cumberland 




C. E. Calloway 


Freddie Parsons 


Evarts 


Evarts 


837-2502 


Nicholas Brewer 


Oharle^ Hunger 


HaU 


Grays Knob 


573-1950 


Charles R. Steele 


James Burkhart 


Harlan 


Harlan 




Arthur K. King 


George Francis 


Loyall 


Loyall 


573-1331 


W. C. McFarland 


Charles A. Davis 


Lynch 


Lynch 


848-5486 


Jack Isaacs 


Edward Miracle 


Pine Mountain 


Pine Mountain 




Caleb Lewallen 


Vernon Conley 


Wallins 


Wallins Creek 


664-3444 


John H. Howard 


James L. Howard 






REGION 14 




D. 53 Fleming Neon 


Fleming 


855-7597 


Roy T. Reasor 


Ralph Roberts 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


832-2184 


Henry E. Wright 


James F. Francis 


Kingdom Come 


Linefork 




I. L. Frazier 


Harold Cornett 


Letcher 


Letcher 


633-2524 


Jeff B. Mayes 


D. C. Taylor 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


633-2339 


J. M. BurWch 


Goebel Ritter 


D. 54 Buckhorn 


Buckhorn 


398-7176 


Fred W. Johnson 


Winfred Smith 


Dilce Combs 


Jeff 


436-2500 


Homer Jones 


Harvey Combs 


Hazard 


Hazard 


436-3711 


John C. Stringer 


Roscoe Shackelford 


Leatherwood 


Leatherwood 


675-4431 


Ronald V. Woods 


Lloyd Smith. Jr. 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


672-2337 


P. P. Estridge 


R. B. Singleton 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


436-4541 


°aul H. Colwell 


\lbert 1 "ombs 



Page Eighl 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 19i?r; 



School 



Addrei; 



Te!. No, PrincJpal 



Casch 



D. 55 Brcathitl 


Jackson 


666-2805 


Millard Tolliver 


P'airce 0. Woods 


Carr Creek 


Carr Cresk 


642-3585 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


R. 2, Hazard 


251-2207 


Alice H. Slone 


George W. Cornetl 


Hindman 


Hindman 


785-5361 


Vesper Singleton 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackson 


666-5164 


James B. Goff 


James B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


785-5783 


Edward Madden 


James Moore 


Oakdale Christian 


R. 1, Jackson 


666-5422 


Willard Trepus 




Ri\-erside Ciiristiai 


Lost Creek 


666-2359 


Harold E. Bamett 


Doran Hostetler 


D. 56 Hazel Green Acad 


Hazel Green 


662-4475 


Mrs. Henry A. Stovall 


Will Dublin 


Lee Count\ 


Beattyville 




Gordon Cook 


Heber Dunaway 


Owsley Co. 


Booneville 


593-2815 


W. 0. Gabbard 


J. D. Seale 


Powell Couiit,\ 


Stanton 


6634475 


Russell Bowen, Jr. 


James L. Davis 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


668-2645 


Bill C. Hurt 


Granville Deaton 






REGION 15 




D. 57 Blaine 


Blaine 


652-3624 


Max E. Calhoun 


Joe P. Blankenshii: 


Flat Gap 


Flat Gap 


265-2164 


W. H. Conley 


Jesse Salyer 


Inez 


Inez 


298-3264 


Ru'^sell Williamson 


Bobby Williamson 


Louisa 


Lou:sa 


638-4574 


J. I. Cheek 


William E. Haines 


Meade Memorial 


Williamsport 


789-5050 


Harold L. Preston 


Howard W. Wallen 


Oil Springs 


Oil Springs 


297-3674 


Virgil Porter 


Paul Williams 


Paintsvillc 


Paintsville 


789-3881 


Paul W. Trimble 


,Tim Wheeler 


Salyersville 


Salyersville 


349-2414 


Creed Arnett 


Robert L. Slone 


Van Lear 


Van Lear 


789-4932 


Hysell Burchett 


Howard Ramey 


Warfield 


Warfield 




Russell H. SlCPP 


John WiUiams 


D. 58 Betsy Laync 


Betsy Layne 


GR 8-2255 


D. W. :-Ic-,vard 


Thomas Boyd 


Garrett 


Garrett 


358-3461 


Burnice Gearheart 


John Campbell, Jr 


McDowell 


McDowell 


377-6202 


Lloyd Stumbo 


Pete Grigsby Jr. 


Martin 


Martin 


285-3011 


Philip Dingus 


Dcnzil Halbert 


Maytown 


Langley 


285-3346 


Edwin V. Stewart 


Lois E. Frasure 


Prestonsburc 


Prestonsburg 


886-2252 


Woodrow Allen 


Jack F. Wells 


Waylajid 


Wayland 


358-3911 


James V. Bolen 


James F. Francis 


Wheelwright 


Wheelwright 




Boone Hall 


Don Wallen 


D. 59 Dorton 


Dorton 


639-2832 


Charles Wright 


Fleetwood Johnson 


Hellier 


Hellier 


754-8184 


Paul L. Owens 


Bob Walters 


Mullins 


R. 1, Pikeville 


432-2733 


Phenis Potter 


Bun Jack Bumette 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


7-6870 


Berry Thacker 


John Lee Butcher 


Virgie 


Virgie 


639-2774 


Fred W. Cox 


Dale Trivette 


D. 60 Beliry 


Belfry 


353-7362 


W. F. Doane 


Jim Hutchens 


Elkhorn Cit> 


Elldiorn City 


754-7981 


James V. Powell 


George Carroll 


Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


835-2286 


Nelson Hamilton 


Ronald Francisco 


Johns Creek 


R. 1, Pikeville 


437-3361 


James T. Dotson 


Aubrey Taylor 


Phelps 


Phelps 


456-9310 


J. H. Cromer 


James E. Carter 






REGION 16 




D. 61 Bath Countj 


Owingsville 


674-2501 


E. L. Karrick 


Thomas M. Evans 


Breckinridge Trnc 


Morehead 


784-4181 


Reedus Back 


Dale McNeely 


ezel 


Esel 


725-4545 


Conrad Rowland 


Henry E. Cochran 


Menifee Count> 


Frenchburg 


768-2373 


Hiram C. Walters 


J. W. Ballard 


Morgan Count\ 


West Libertj 


743-3705 


Elmer D. Anderson 


Charles E. Cain 


Rowan Count.\ 


Morehead 


784-4153 


Russell Boyd 


Warren Cooper 


D. 62 Carter 


Carter 


474-6121 


William N. Collins 


Paul Webb 


Hitchins 


Hitchins 


474-5784 


Leonard Marshall 


Roy F. Murphy 


Olive Hill 


OUve Hill 


286-2481 


Glenn M. Sparks 


Jack Fultz 


Pri chard 


Grayson 


474-5421 


John R. Hartig 


Dicit Vincent 


Sandy Hook 


Sandy Hook 


RE 8-5225 


John H. Vansant 


Jesse J. Adkins 


D. 63 Greenup 


Greenup 


473-3781 


Ethel McBrayer 


Ramoy Fle'.cher 


McKell 


South Shore 


9'',2-3323 


Charles E. Mullins 


Robert Crotty 


Raceland 


Raceland 


836-8221 


H. R. Bowling 


Tom Hamilton 


Russell 


Russell 


836-3531 


Frank V. Firestine 


Marvin Meredith 


South Portsmoutli 


South Portsmouth 


932-3221 


William Ryan 


William Ryan 


Wurfland 


Wurtland 


836-3931 


Charles Banks 


Larry Jordan 


D. 64 Boyd County 


R. 2, Ashland 


739-4428 


Cobble Lee 


Harold Tate 


Catlettsburg 


Catlettsburg 


739-4663 


Jack Clifford 


Larry McKenzie 


Fairview 


Ashland 


324-9226 


Webb Young 


George Cooke 


Hol>- Family 


Ashland 


324-7040 


Sr. Mary, C.D.P. 


Robert L. Gilmore 


Paul G. Blazer 


Ashland 


3254706 


Clyde Hunsaker 


Harold Cole 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Page Nine 



FLAGET — CLASS AAA FINALISTS 




^* 



(Left to Right) Front Row: William Noonan, Mike Riggs, Allan Hume William \Uadorq Terrv 
Cecil, Ronald Kurtz, John DiCello, James Baits, Mike Qurnkert, Mike Hiffdon Rav Bible. Kenny 
Rieger, Dan Robinson. Second Roy: Robert Robinson, Jim Brown Eernie Kre-ner John Siegel Dave 
Norris. Dave Henglin, Wally Vertrees. Steve Boone, Bob McGrath Phil DeeH, Mike lenkms Paul 
Hughes, George Nicholas. Third Row: Clifford Robinson. Ron Roth. Herman Vaughan. Dave Bratcher. 
Jim Gray, Pete Mattingly, Mike Wright. Bill Troutman. Pat Rvan. Kevin Thompson. Leo Sullivan. 
Mike Haskens. Wm. DeSensi, Eugene Weihe, Paul Gwiazdowski. Fourth Row: Eddie Chavers. Mike 
Schmitt, Terry Meagher, Louis Kulp, Jim Mitchell, Oscar Brohm. Mike Potter, Steve Reed, Dave 
Steiger, Richard Board. 

MIDDLESBORO — CLASS AA FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: George Cadle, Kermit Owens, Wallace Bolton. Larry Thacker. Dong' 
Rainfi, Greg Page, Gary Medley, Bill Tarnblazer, Howard Bailey, John O'Boyle, Doug Williams. Second 
Row: David Davis, Tom Barton, Larry Idol, David Jenkins, Deaver Spriggs, Bob Smith, Lewis Huff, 
James Lake, Hank Barnes, David Dalton. Third Row: Alan Abelson, Burton Brackett, John Rodgers, 
Randy England, Danny Massengill, Tom Smith, Orville GuUey, Bob Haley, Bill Green, Craig Yeary. 

HARRISON COUNTY — CLASS AA. REGION 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jim Monroe. Jim Mullen. Ron Darnell. Bill Talbott. Tom Pierce, Jim 
Whitehead, Carl Cummins. Terry Box, Larry Wiley. Second Row: Don Smith. Mike Kjarns. Terry 
Perrant, John McGill, George Pierce, Jim Juett, Eddie Butler, Rick Chasteen. Larry Levi, Rick Arnold, 
Don Spicer ThrdRow:Bob Ammerman. Jim Prather, Allen Hollar. Dave Palmer, Jim Furnish, Mike 
Rimas, Gary Hill, Rick Powell, Tevis Gray, Sam Pierce, Harry Dence. Fourth Row: Jerry Casey. Roger 
Gasser, Mike Ammerman, Dan Pierce, Ted Taylor, Jerry Ingram, Gayle King, Mike Taylor, John Talbott. 



Pa,i;e Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 

It is Christmas time as this column 
ii- being penned and a new year is waiting. 
Surrounded by scores of Christmas cards 
which have come from friends all over Ken- 
tucky, the Dutchman is grateful for the 
blessings of friendship throughout 1965. 

1965 had its happy moments as well as 
its sad ones. In the happier vein there was 
the naming of Ernie Chattin as Mr. Recrea- 
tion of the Year. Other stellar occasions 
were the colorful presentation of the State 
Basketball Tournament by Ted and Joe 
Billy, an enjoyable clinic sashay over the 
Commonwealth meeting old friends and 
making new ones, and the introduction of 
the Game Guv of 1965 at the Annual State- 
wide Sports Banquet. 

A sadder note was sounded as the old 
year passsed. A letter came from a long 
time friend, Aaron Turner, principal of 
North Warren High School, telling of the 
passing of W. L. Gardner who served as 
principal of Park City High School for the 
past 18 years. Aaron extolled the virtues of 
Mr. Gardner, whom we all knew and loved. 
We called him "Woody." 

Memories came flooding back with the 
receipt of this letter. The Dutchman rem- 
embered a good looking kid who played one 
of his first basketball games at Glasgow 
Junction High School with your writer as 
the official. No better athlete ever stepped 
on the floor in Kentucky, few were ever as 
talented, and certainly no one could rate 
higher in the category ol Kentucky gentle- 
men than Woody Gardnei, 

Woody went on to becoming a Corn Cob 
Pipe winner and it was thih same Kentucky 
gentleman who nominated David Wood to 
the Game Guy of 1962 and it was David 
Wood who carried off the honor. Aaron 
Turner says Kentucky has lost a dedicated 
administrator and a lover of all sports as 
well as a man who helped to mold the lives 
of many young men and women, and we 
add to the following: "Lives of great men 
all remind us that we can make our lives 
sublime and departing leave behind us 
footprints in the sands of time." 

As the old year bowed out the Dutch- 
man attended a party sponsored by the East 
Jeffersonville Lions Club of Fern Creek for 
physically handicapped boys and girls which 
could well serve as a model for occasions of 
a similar nature all over Kentucky. With 



Fern Creekers Warren Stout, Jim Kirk, 
Archie Hornbeck and Warren's son, Cliff, 
taking the lead, physically handicapped 
youngsters were given a party which they 
will never forget. The Dutchman salutes 
this club via an Abou Ben Adhem Award. 

With the increasing interest in the 
Game Guy Program of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association, such occasions 
for less fortunate boys and girls well mean 
the difference between ihappiness and lives 
of loneliness and sadness. The greatest 
thing which comes to us from our associa- 
tions in sports is not the championship but 
rather the smile on a face where one didn't 
exist before. 

From Cletus Hubbs, Jr., of Eminence, 
comes a request for a ruling on the follow- 
ing situation: Team A has two players on 
the score book with the same number. Both 
of these players participate in first half, 
but not at the same time. It is not dis- 
covered, however, until half time that this 
has happened. The two players remain on 
the book with the same number during the 
second half. The ruling here is that there 
is no violation unless both of these players 
with the same number participate at the 
same time. 

While we are on play situations let us 
get straight on this one: A-1 has not drib- 
bled. He places the ball on the floor and 
straightens up. He then picks the ball up 
again. May he then dribble? No. Placing the 
ball on the floor and picking it up constitut- 
ed the completion of a dribble and any subse- 
quent dribble would be a violation. This 
situation has been happening over Kentucky 
and it is being pointed out to the Dutch- 
man that the Globetrotters do it all the 
time. To this we reply that the Globe- 
trotters break just about every rule in the 
book. 

From my old buddy, Courtney Clark, the 
sage of the high country around Ashland, 
comes an ash tray in the shape of a skillet 
advertising the University of Southern Mis- 
sissippi in Hattiesburg. That is where 
Courtney's son. Jeep, is coaching basketball, 
and Courtney is one of the proudest male 
parents this scribbler has ever met. Thanks 
for the memento, Courtney, and keep puff- 
ing away on your cob pipe. 

We have a friend in Calloway County, 
in the heart of the Purchase, in the person 
of William B. "Buffalo Bill" Miller, prin- 
cipal of Callowav County High. Bill writes 
the following: "Congratulations on the fine 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Page Eleven 



job Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion is doing- for the young people of Ken- 
tucky! I read your column each time the 
Journal comes around. In fact, your column 
prompted me to write this letter of recom- 
mendation." 

"I have a fellow I would like to recom- 
mend for the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor A- 
ward. I am enclosing a brief biography of 
his teaching life. Mr. Buron "Boots" Jeffrey 
has been a teacher, coach, principal - coach, 
and county school superintendent for 41 
years. He began his teaching career in Pu- 
laski County where he taught for one year, 
1925-26. In the second semester of the 1925- 
26 school year he moved to Lynn Grove High 
School at Lynn Grove, Kentucky, where he 
served as teacher, coach, and principal-coach 
until 1950. In 1950 he became Superin- 
tendent of Calloway County Schools where 
he is presently serving. In these years, count- 
less numbers of young people have come 
under his influence. Many of his students 
are now serving mankind in all walks of 
life. He is vitally interested in all young 
people everywhere. Therefore, I would lilke 
to recommend him for this honor." 

The first Corn Cob Pipe of Honor A- 
ward for the year of 1966 has been sent to 
"Boots" Jeffrey — may his tribe increase. 

Incidentally, Preston "Ty" Holland is 
located in that country, and it is a safe bet 
that any place this fellow Holland goes you 
will find his goodness rubbing off on some- 
body else. That's just the kind of fellow 
"Ty" Holland is. 

Watching the Los Angeles Rams play 
the Baltimore Colts on coast to coast tele- 
vision brought a thrill to this Dutch writer 
as he watched the one and only Tommy Bell 
officiate that important classic. Ted, Joe 
Billy and others who are almost in the 
Dutchman's age bracket, remember a 
scrappy little quarterback playing in high 
school in Lexington who went on to become 
a top-flight basketball official and then 
rose to the heights to become one of the 
top-flight football officials. Practicing law 
in his spare time. Tommy must have a legal 
mind filled with the Kentucky statutes, the 
football statutes and the basketball statutes. 
Just one of these categories makes nervous 
wrecks out of most of us but our Tommy is 
so cool and collected that he can under shoot 
Harry Stephenson on the golf course any 
time Harry gets his clubs out. 

If any of you people know the name of 



the mountaineer joker who sent the Dutch- 
man a Christmas present in the form of a 
comb and hair brush please let us know. 
This writer needs that present like he needs 
a hole in his head. Right now a good guess 
is that it came from a character in the 
Whitesburg country by the name of Goebel 
Ritter. 

As the Dutchman closes his column 
with a wish for a haowy new year, he passes 
on the following philosophy: 

"Live for someti^ino", have a nurpose, 
And that ouroose keen in view, 
Driftinsr like a helmless vessel, 
TVou cans't ne'er to life be true." 



The Basketball Hall of Fame 

Dnrino- the sphool vear 1964-65. twentv- 
one additional K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
made contributions or pledges to the Basket- 
ball Hall of Fame, bringing the total num- 
ber of contributing schools to forty-six. Of 
this number, twenty-seven schools have tak- 
en out or will take out Group Membership 
at $100. 0'O each. Contributing members are 
listed below. 

Kentucky school men and those in other 
States have used various methods in raising 
money for Basketball Hall of Fame Group 
Memberships. The following have proved 
most successful and least obiectionable: 

1. Hold Hall of Fame Night (collection 
at game). 

2. Ask sports writers to assist in pro- 
motin<r nlan calling for fans to mail in small 
checks to school athletic fund. 

3. During radio broadcast of gam_e, ask 
listeners to send contributions to school ath- 
letic fund. 

4. Ask service clubs for contributions. 

5. Solicit student contributions. 

6. Ask Pep Club to underwrite member- 
ship. 

7. Purchase membership from athletic 
fund receiots. 

BASKETBALL HALL OF FAME SCORE BOARD 



$100 Contribut-ions and 


Pledqes 


Allen County 


Dayton 


Morgan County 


Bishop David 


Durrett 


Owensboro 


Rloomfield 


Ezel 


Pikeville 


Bourbon County 


Harlan 


Plet.<iure Ridge Park 


Breathitt 


Hazard 


Reidland 


Caneyville 


LfOg'an Co. A. A. 


Rowan County 


Carr Creek 


Mason County 


St. Mary's (Whitesville) 


Cavema 


Midway 


Sayre 


Daviess County 


M. M. I. 


Tomnkinsville 


ConfribuHons Less Than $100 


Beechwood 


Holmes 


Prichard 


Calhoun 


Knott County 


Pulaski County 


Campbell County 


Livingston Centra] 


1 ShQpville 


Campbellsville 


Monti cello 


Somerset 


Central 


Nancy 


Valley 


Ferguson 


Paints ville 


Wayne County 


Henry Clay 







Paee Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Guest Editorial 

LJtiT'S KEEP UP 
THE PROGRESS 

Before they toss up the ball to start the new 
basketball season, we would like to say a few words 
about the emphasis placed on the conduct of bench 
personnel during the 1964-65 season. 

We all recognize the rather unique aspects of 
high school basketball, particularly as they relate to 
the emotional environment surrounding the game. Last 
year the National Basketball Rules Committee drafted 
Rule 10-7 in an effort to spell out the proper conduct 
of aU bench personnel. 

Along with this rule change went an appeal to 
coaches, principals and game officials to enMst their 
cooperation in seeing that the undersirable aspects 
of team and spectator sportsmanship be removed and 
that interscholastic basketball remain a wholesome 
activity, making a very worthwhile contribution to 
the over-all educational program of the school. 

While reports received concerning last year's 
efforts were extremely encouraging, there were, un- 
fortunately, a few officials and coaches who "didn't 
get the word". So that we can continue to improve 
in this area, we are renewing our plea for a complete 
understanding of the interpretation of Rule 10, Section 
7, of the 1965-66 Basketball Rules. 

The COACH must accept the fact that he is res- 
ponsible for setting an example of sportsmanship and 
self-control that will not only contribute to a healthy 
game atmosphere, but will also permit him to do a 
better job as coach and leader of his team. He should 
insist that his players respect the authority of the 
game officials and accept their decisions without 
verbal or visible signs of protest. 

The OFFICIAL must remember that during the 
contest he is entrusted with the responsibility of 
administering the game according to the rules as 
written. As long as he does so, he will have the com- 
plete support of the State Association. If an official 
fails to accept this responsibility by "setting aside a 
rule to avoid an unpleasant situation", he is most 
assuredly inviting trouble. 

The HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL is recognized by 
the IHSA as the official representative of his school. 
Though he may delegate authority to members of his 
faculty — the ultimate responsibility for the conduct 
and actions of members of the school coaching staff 
is his alone. It is strongly recommended that each 
principal meet with his coaches for the purpose of 
discussing exactly what he expects from them in re- 
gard to their responsibiUties and conduct before, 
during, and immediately alter an interscholastic con- 
test. Of particular concern is the necessity for a clear 
understanding of the restrictions placed on a coach 
(and other bench personnel) during the game. 

Rule 10, Section 7, specifies quite clearly what 
those on the bench may or may not do. Bench per- 
sonnel are prohibited from engaging in any actions 
which would indicate objection to an official's de- 
cision, or which would invite undesirable crowd reac- 
tions. It requires coaches to remain seated on the 
bench except during certain situations which are 
speUed out in the rule. 

Under these provisions, a coach may leave the 
bench to encourage or direct his players only while 
the clock is stopped. He may also leave the bench 
for certain other very specific duties that include (1) 
signaling his players to call a time-out, (2) to confer 
with a substitute, or (3) when necessary to confer 
with personnel at the scorer's table. 

If this rule is to be properly enforced, it wUl 
take the cooperation of everyone concerned with 



In Memoriam 




WOODFORD LLOYD GARDNER 

Woodford Lloyd Gardner who taught 
and coached at Park City High School for 
nine years before becoming its Principal in 
1948, died on December 11, 1965, from an 
apparent heart attack. 

Woodford graduated from Cave City 
High School in 1932. During his high school 
years, he was outstanding in basketball and 
baseball. He attended Western Kentucky 
State College where he played basketball as 
a freshman. He was in professional baseball 
for about three years, playing with Mobile, 
Alabama, and Kilgore, Texas, in the minor 
leagues. Later he returned to Western to 
complete his Master's Degree in Education. 
At Park City Mr. Gardner earned the repu- 
tation of being one of the most efficient and 
capable school administrators in Barren 
County and the Third District. His love for 
sports was evident in the many years he 
gave to coaching. A man of dynamic person- 
ality, he gained the love and resptect of eve- 
ry boy who was associated with his teams. 

Mr. Gardner was an active member of 
the Park City Methodist Church. He was 
affiliated with the Park City Lions Club, 
Masonic Lodge, and was a Shriner. 

Survivors include his wife Capitola Ar- 
terburn Gardner ; two sons. Woody Jr., Soph- 
omore at Western Kentucky State College, 
andn Randy, age 9, in the fourth grade at 
Park City School. — W.B.B. 



keeping basketball the fine game it is. While the 
officials have been instructed to enforce this rule 
without warning, it should be the responsibility of 
school administrators to impress u*>on their coaches 
the need for observing this rule so that it will not be 
necesary to assess teahnical fouls for violation of 
Rule 10-7. 

— The Illinois Interscholastic 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Page Thirteen 



VALLEY— CLASS AAA, REGION 2. DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Ri^ht) Front Row: Jack Diemer, Steve Redmon, Andy Arnold, Gary Hicks, Mike Wells, Mike 
Tacket, Steve Sells, Kenny Morris, Mirr. Ray Enirlish. Second Row: Coach Arnold, Ricky Perry, Tom 
Jones, Mark Wilson, Bill Young, Fred Bullard, Mike Pahey, Gary Dugr^rins, Mgr. Stan Savori. Third 
Row: Ray Norman. Carl Cox, Doug McConnaughhay, George Fahey, Doug Anderson, Clark Sebree, 
Tom Grisham, Tom Pope, Mgr. Bob Mannahan. Fourth Row: Coach Anderson, Lou Bonknight, Richard 
Smith, Gary EIrod, Darrell Carter, William Ashby, R. D. Knight, Doug Grabhom. Mgr. Dicky Beard. 
Fifth Row: Coach Spencer. Mike Disney, Greg Jaggers, Bill Gradner, Randy Duvall, David Anderson, 
Leslie Helton, Mike Camfield. 



FROM THE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 

(Continued from Page Two) 



Finley, Albert R. 
Fraley, BiU 
Frye, Gil 
Fryrear, David 
Gaither, Gene 
Galuk, Walter M. 
Golden, Billy Joe 
Goode, Earl A. 
Graham, James 
Graham, Ronnie 
Harper, Robie 
Henderson, Hugh 
Henson, Tony 
Hinton, Henry 
Hobhs, Charles 
Holthouser, Ora L. 
Hughes, Paul P. 
Kelly, Charles 
Kloufetos, Spiro 
Kuhl, Lawrence 
McCargo, Frank 
McNamee, Jack 



Madon, Robert L. 
Metzger, Don 
Miller, Leemon O., Jr. 
Nash, Dennis B. 
Omer, Harold G. 
O'Nan, Norman 
Pack, James W. 
Radiunas. Eddie 
Scilyer, Henry E. 
Sharp, Lloyd 
Shuck, Thomas G. 
Stoess, Henry L. 
Singleton, Ronnie H. 
Smith, William E. 
Stokes, Bob 
Thompson, Thomas A. 
Triplette, Herbert 
Wallen, Howard W. 
Ward, Robert L. 
Weiner, Dick 
Williams, Paul W. 
Wirtz, Howard 
Wrieht. James Lloyd 
New Track Film 
The new track film, THIS IS TRACK AND FIELD, 
was released for distribution last July. The film is 
produced under the sanction and supervision of the 
National Federation and allied groups. It is -the twenty- 
fourth in the series of official rules fibns. Wilson 
Sporting Good'; Co. and Wheaties Sports Federation 
are again serving as co-sponEors of the film as they 
have all previous films. 

The scenes for THIS IS TRACK AND FIELD were 
filmed on the new all weather track at Hobbs High 
School, Kobbs, New Mexico. The host state association 
was the New Jlexico High School Activities Association. 
Track and field personnel were chosen from the Hobbs 
High School. Members of the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations and allied 
groups served as members of the Technical Staff, and 
thereby assure the authenticity of the rules for the sit- 



uations filmed. Outstanding area track and field offi- 
cials appeared in the film. 

Track and field officials, coaches, participants and 
fans have long desired audio visual help to understand 
the basic rules of running, jumping, vaulting and 
throwing. THIS IS TRACK AND FIELD is produced to 
provide a better understanding of the regulations under 
which modern track and field events are conducted. 
The words — "Swifter — Higher — Stronger" used in 
the Olympic Motto introduces a panorama of track and 
field situations. The fihn is recommended for all inter- 
ested in this age old sport. 

A print of the film has been secured by the Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association, and has been 
placed on loan with the Bureau of School Service, Col- 
lege of Education. University of Kentucky. 
Coach of the Year Clinic 

The Second Annual Kodak Coadh of the Year Clinic 
will be held at the Brown Hotel, LouisvUle, Kentucky, 
on February 4-6, 1966. The clinic is for football coaches. 
It is co-directed by Duffy Daugherty and Bud Wilkin- 
son. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

fl,isl' Como'lfH .Miuary ^^ 

If one telephone namber is piven for an official listed, 
it is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two nam- 
bers are driven, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Allen, Harry Gordon, Box 163, Prestonsburg, 874-2516 
Allen, James W., 3444 Monel Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Antonini. William H.. 4128 Mill Creek Drive, Shively, 448-3079 
Atwell, Charles D., Lewisport, CY 5-3655, 5-9400 
Baker, Ralph. 1529 State St., Bowling Green, 2-9802 
Blackburn, Adrian, Scott Court, Prestonsburg, 886-2401, 886- 

3080 
Bradford, Robert L., 9 Tremont, Ft. Thomas, 781-1217. 761-3600 
Brinegar, Elvin, 5111 Lansill Drive, Apt. G-75, Lexington, 

277-8500. 277-5122 
Butler. Donald A., 2966 Chippewa Drive, Owensboro, MU 3- 

3175, MU 4-1451 
Butler, Ronald E., 644 North Seminary St.. Madisonville, 252-0372 
Chaney, L. Michael. Box 1000, Pine Knot. 354-3466 
Clark, Owen B., 106 Kentucky Ave... Georgetown. 2047, Lex- 
ington 252-8717 
Collins, Jack, 8333 Jadwin. Cincinnati, Ohio, 821-7791, 825-1500 
Crutcher, Joseph L., 115 Edelen St., Vine Grove. 877-2448, 4- 

3837 
Dinsmore, HariT V., 252 South Highland, Winchester. 744-5721, 

744-4618 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



HENDERSON — CLASS AA, REGION I, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Richard Moss, Robert Cobb, Gary Satterfield, Lee Gold, Mike Herron, 
Larenzo Banks, Donald Taylor. Wylie Summers, Eddie Hunt, Bobby Page. Second Row: Kenny Rideout, 
Paal Hennessy, Lop Satterfield, Buzzy Groves, Jimmy Bebout, Tom Lowden, Richard Jennings, Jay 
Davis, James Thomas, Ronnie Woody. Larry Martin. Third Row: Billv Frver, Coach James Ward. Coach 
Philip Collins, Skip piinter. Con Cave. James White, Dude Wheeler, Tom Latta. Roger Davis, Bill 
Latta. Coach Don Phillips, Coach Bill Dawson. Fourth Row: Charles Hamilton. David Deron, Dave 
Shields. Gabe Davis, Charles Folder, Larry Shelton, David Beavens, Jackie Willingham, Mac Grace, 
Mike Willingham, Richard Morris, Ryan Head. 



Elder, Charles J.. Jr., 5314 Euclid Ave., Valley Station, 921- 

9376, 367-6423 
Fisher, Michael. 6111 Count Turf Drive. Valley Station, 937-2593 
Flinchum, L. Paul. Brockton. Apt. 120, Richmqnd 
Cover. Luid J., Box 34. Monticello. 348-5911, 348-5911 
Green. Walt. 411 N. 26th St., Middlesboro, 248-4B69, 248-1000 
Griffith. Rudolph, Jr., Prestonsburg, TU 6-3036 (Bus.) 
Grunkemeyer. Michael. 3138 Willis Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Harrell. Bill D.. 129 Alton Ed.. Shelbyville, 633-4601, 633-2344 
Hensley, Spencer D., 403 South 7th St., Padueah 
Hooper. David Elliot, 503 Pyke Road, Lexington, 254-7869, 

254-6170 

Wayland. 358-3861, 358-2341 

935 Richardson, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-3037, 



Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 661-5792, 



Hughes, Charle 
Hunt, Jack L. 

647-6222 
Jacob, John J., 2754 Montan 

621-4426 

James, Jackie L.. 9404 Ponder Lane, Valley Station, 937-3726 
Jenkins. James D., Route No. 1, Bowling Green, 842-3088, 

842-5954 
Kingsley, Douglas F., 2603 Dartmouth Drive, Owensboro, MU 

3-5171 
Koharian, Bruce E.. Richmond Hall, Box 693, Murray College, 

Murray, 762-3718 
Lally, James J., 3013 Pamela Way, Louisville, 451-3699, 584- 

8301 
Latkovski, Anastasius, 2114 Edgeland Ave., Louisville, 459- 

5360. 636-2525 
Lester, J. L.. 216 N. Broadway, Georgetown. 1802 
Marema. Jack G., Annville, 364-2446, 364-3320 
Maynard. Lonnie, Freeburn, 456-3563 

Mays, Charles R., Route No. 1, Box 235. Corbin, 628-4160 
Morris, Charles. Route No. 1. Box 17, Lily, 864-4379, 864-4340 
Parsons, Roy, 705 27th St., Ashland. 324-7994. 324-6191 
Pollock. Carl L., Hardinsburg, 756-2398 
Reeves. Curtis Ray, 608 Barkley, Falmouth. 654-5241 
Rehfuss, Arnd M.. 125 Brookwood Drive. Alexandria, 635-5088. 

694-6112 
Rose, Wally, 623 Southridge, Lexington, 299-5881 
Rowe, Steve, 705 Josephine Drive, Bowling Green, 842-0646 
Schmidt. Frank L.. 4902 Rural Way, Louisville, 964-5613 
Scott. Donald, Red Bird Mission, Beverly, ED 7-3300 (Bus.) 
Scott. Tinker, College Station, Box 239, Murray 
Sergent, James, 3716 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, 325-2474, 325- 

2474 
Skidmore, Richard Lynn, Route No. 1, Waynesburg, 379-4315 
Snorton, Claude. Jr., 107 W. Edmunds. Hopkinsville. 886-6575 
Staples, Jerry, 803 Letcher St.. Henderson, 826-4882, 826-9085 
Stokes, William R., Route No. 1, Lewisburg, PA 6-6729. PA 

6-2441 
Tackett, Johnny Cai-mel, Route No. 1, Box 49, Rush, 928-3052 
Tarry. William Robert, Route No. 5, Glasgow, 678-2539 
VanTatenhove, Kenneth. Annville, 364-2445, 364-3320 
Vest, Walter Thomas, Mize, 725-4431 
Vories. Richard. 1211 Wilson Rd., Bellevue. 781-1391 
Watkins, Yancey Lee. 11 Congress Drive, Morganfield, 389- 

1542, 389-1454 
Wells, Milford, Patton St., Prestonsburg. TU 6-6101. TU 6-22B2 



Winnecke, John E., 1502 Brentwood, Owensboro, 684-2604, 

684-5285 
Wright. Raleigh, Broad Bottom, 432-2319 
Zogg, Joe F., Box 1218, Owensboro, MU 3-0152, MU 3-7301 



Films 



The films listed below arc in the Film Library of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky College of Education. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscriptions service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials, 

Tennis 

ADVANCED TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil. Bill Tilden 
narrates and demonstrates, showing advanced tech- 
niques of tennis. 

BEGINNING TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, IV2 reels, (14 min.), 
$2.50 
Shows how the tennis instructor teaches tennis to 
beginning and advanced students. Includes an amalysis 
of the basic fundamentals of tennis— serving, forehand 
and backhand drive, forehand and backhand volley, 
and the smash. Shows actual play situations in which 
these fundamentals are emphasized, and also includes 
individual demonstration and analysis. 

Gymnastics 

GYMNASTICS, PART I, j-s-c-a, IVa reels (17 min.), $2.50 
Introduces the basic principles of gymnastics and 
follows the routines developed by polished performers 
3n the parallel bars, the rope climb, and the long horse. 
Attention is given to the rolls, handstands, and hand- 
springs, twists, and somersaults that are basic to 
tumbling. (Hoefler). 

GYMNASTICS, PART II, j-s-c-a, 11/2 reels (17 min,), 
$2.50 
Inh'oduces the gymnast to the fundamentals of free 
exercise routines. Stresses the importance of smooth 
action as well as strength, farm, balance, and ability 
to develop the difficult routines. Demonstrates rings, 
side horse, and the high bar. (Hoefler). 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Page Fifteen 



LARUE COUNTY — CLASS AA, REGION 2. DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Seated in Front: Mgr. David Nicholas. First Row: Ass't. Coach Jack Mitchell, Terry 
Hazle, Mike Cundiff, David Walters, Mike Williams, Raymond Wells, Ronnie Fletcher, Pat Burd, James 
Cantrell, Richard Poore. Second Row: Ass't. Coach Clarkie Mayfield, Mike Milby, Merle Edlin, Richard 
Taylor, Leslie Salsman, David Cundiff, George Gilpin, James McKenzie, Larry Crady, Scotty Marcnm, 
Coach Clarence Caple. Third Row: Bill Hazle, Jerry Akermon, Harvey Ragland, Bill Greenleaf, Danny 
Rock, Mike Nichols, Wayne Lyons, William Masden, George Handley, Billy Poore. 



What Is An Official? 

Between the exuberance of the winner and the 
downhearted dismay of the loser we find a creature 
called an official. Officials come in assorted sizes and 
shapes but usually are dressed in the same type of 
uniform. All, however, have the same creed — to watoh 
every play of every quarter of every game and to 
call the plays to the best of their abilities as they see 
them. 

Officials are found everyhere — on the field, in the 
gym, on the track, on the mat, on the diamond, in 
the pool — on top of, running 2iround, jtunping over, 
cUmbing through, and always with whistle ready, look- 
ing, looking, looking for some infraction. Fellow 
officials rib them, athletes tolerate them, spectators 
boo them, coaches criticize them, wives adore them, 
sons and daughters idolize them, and mothers worry 
about them. An official is Courage in cleats, Spirit in 
stripes, Wisdom with a whistle and despite the fact 
that they get paid for their work, they have a devotion 
to duty above and beyond that one normally finds in 
a day's work. 

When the game is close, the officials are incompe- 
tent, indecisive, and stupid. When it is one-sided, they 
are merciless, whistlenhappy, careless and domineering. 

An official is a composite. He looks like a gentle- 
man, acts like a traffic cop, is as fussy as an old 
grandmother with her sewing basket, and as immacu- 
late as a debutante. 

To himself, an official has never missed a play, 
called a ball a strike or split a second incorrectly with 
a stop watch. He has the eyes of an eagle, the keen 
mind of an Einstein, the judgement of Solomon and the 
speed and graceful motion of Joe DiMaggio and Jessie 
Owens, all rolled into into one. 

To the men who work with him, he is always out 
of position, runs like a truck, steals calls from under 
his partner's nose, is blind as a bat, stupid as a mule, 
and is utterly incapable of making a correct decision 
on anything except who should drive. 

An official likes trips out of town (with mileage), 
few training sessions, well-coached teams, considerate 
coaches, polite players, dry fields, cool crisp days, and 
the quiet satisfaction of having been a part of a perfect 
football day. He cares not for wet games, tough deci- 



sions, screaming coaches and irate fans. 

An official is a wonderful creature. You can criti- 
cize him but you can't intimidate him. You can ques- 
tion his judgment but not his honesty. He is the sym- 
bol of fair play, integrity and sportsmanship. He is a 
hard-working, alert, determined individual who is mak- 
ing a great contribution to the American way of life 
through athletics. 

— Peter Billick, Rochester, New York 



The Athlete's Heart 

The notion that the athlete's heart is an abnormally 
and unhealthfuUy enlarged heart has long been ex- 
posed as a myth. The heart of the trained athlete is 
now considered normal and its counterpart — the 
loafer's heart — abnormal. 

The athlete has been judiciously guided by com- 
petent leadership to extend himself benefically beyond 
the early stages of fatigue in a progressive training 
program. As a result, his heart pumps a greater out- 
put of blood per minute with fewer beats. It relaxes 
longer and more completely between beats. Its 
strengthened musculature emoties the filled chambers 
more effectively. The heart now works far more effici- 
ently at rest and far more capably during activity. 
This is no more than the normal function of the heart: 
to propel blood to the body tissues as required. 

The most fundamental element of all sports — 
both contact and noncontact — is the ability to endure. 
Fatigue first shows subtly in the finer muscles that 
are essential to refined skilled movement, and then 
more obviously in impaired gross performance. The 
athlete who "lasts" (skillfully) is less prone to injury. 
The athlete who "outlasts" his opponent (again skill- 
fully) achieves. 

The athlete's heart, being efficient, can divert a 
considerable amount of oxygen away from its own 
needs to meet the needs of other body tissues. Its im- 
proved capability to supply adequate oxygen to the 
body as required and to remove, equally adequately, 
the metabolic wastes, is the essence of endurance. 
As the body's prime endurance muscle, the athlete's 
heart enlarges only moderately if at all, and reverts 
to initial sdze if rigorous training ceases. The effects 
of training on the heart and on the whole cardiovascu- 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



NEWPORT CATHOLIC — CLASS AA, REGION 3, CHAMPION 




(Left to Rigrlit) Front Row: Dan Schabell, Phil Osterhage, Mike Gubser, Eddie Zieglcr. Mike Sherdian, 
Dave Little, Ron Crosswaite. Second Row: Joe Fischer. Mike Gentrup. Nick Maiorino, Gary Johns, Greg 
Smith, Bob Egan, Bob Kelly, John Rappio, Pat Sheridan. Third Row: Mike Votel. Jerry Bertke, Jim 
Schneider, Larry McClaron, Bob Macke, Greg Ladenbager, Terry Mann, Mike Fey, Joe Klare, Jack 
Neiser. Fourth Row : Tom Goetz, Greg Klein, Ron Radenheimer, Ken Lemberg, Ed Huber, Rick Muench, 
John Wimberg, Dave Kremer, Jim Dollar, Bill Drews. 



lar system are more clearly reflected in one's tolerance 
to prolonged activity. 

There is no evidence to show that exercise has 
ever damaged a normal heart in a properly conditioned 
healthy athlete. Hearts are weakened by disease or 
congenital defects, not by participation in sports. How- 
ever, since considerable stress is necessary to "train" 
a heart and keep it trained, this same stress can be 
detrimental or debilitating if disease or defect is pre- 
sent. Thus cooperative medical and athletic supervi- 
sion is a must for activity programs. 

IVIedical evaluation should precede the onset of a 
rigorous exercise program by the sports enthusiast 
of any age. If a heart abnormality is found exercise 
may be prescribed, but only if careful supervision is 
assured. Sports involvement easily bypasses the natural 
inclination to rest and the athlete can find himself 
exerting beyond his intentions. While the normal heart 
will become improved, an impaired heart may not be 
able to tolerate this increased load. 

Athletic leadership, therefore, must be sensitive to 
symptoms that indicate the need for medical reexami- 
nation: breathlessness, rapid pounding heart, or ex- 
treme weakness or shakiness that last for more than 
ten minute after exercise; broken sleep or unusual 
restlessness during the night following strenuous ex- 
ercise; or fatigue that holds over through the next 
day. These may be signs that the athlete pushed too 
far too fast. They may indicate the athlete's lack of 
attention to other aspects of training such as rest, 
nutrition, and healthful living in general. Or they may 
suggest the presence of a previously undetected heart 
problem. 

While few can aspire reaUstically to the athlete's 
heart that permits a sub four-minute mile or the 
running of the marathon, it is realistic to make an 
improvement on a loafer's heart. The loafer's heart 
is only seemingly healthy. Its level of tolerance is 
geared only to the relative sedentary Ufe that produced 
it, and may not suffice at moments of unusual stress 



or emergency. The loafer's heart is also vulnerable 
to American urban society's characteristic stresses 
such as emotional pressures and excessive smoking. 
Such stress may be particularly hazardous because it 
is now known that many young presumably healthy A- 
mericans have unrecognized early stages of degenera- 
tive heart disease. 

The athlete's heart must not be considered the 
exclusive property of the varstiy athlete or, neces- 
sarily, his permanent possession. It is an attainment 
to be earned through engaging in regular suitable en- 
durance-type exercise, each in one's own way ac- 
cording to respective interests, capabilities, and limita- 
tions. 

— National Federation and The A. M. A. 

THE PURPOSES OF COMPETITION 

The purposes of competition dictate the nature of 
any athletic program. A lack of understanding of 
this principle results in confused thinking and, in 
some situations, develops conflicts in administration. 

Misunderstanding results when a person or group 
does not differentiate between the reasons for pro- 
fessional athletics and athletics which are sponsored 
by educational instiutions. Trouble ensues when a fan 
or official uses the same standards to judge profes- 
sional and school athletics. 

Unless the interscholastic program serves educa- 
tional purposes, it has no place in the school program. 
School athletic policies must be determined on the 
basis of the effect athletics have on the education of 
the student. When this principle is observed, the 
conduct and nature of the program is crystal clear. 

Professional sports are, of course, entertainment. 
They are a phase of show business. "This is perfectly 
legitimate. Their purpose is different from that of 
interscholastic athletics. Because of the differences in 
purposes of educational sports and professional sports, 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Page Seventeen 



ASHLAND — CLASS AA, REGION 3, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left To Right) Front Row: Mgr. Condit Steil, Dan Hickman. Mike Simmons, Panl Hill, John Radjanas, 
Jim Ward, Gary Layman, Bob Mahan, Tobey Tolbert, Jim Skaggs, Rodney White, Trainer Emmor 
Evans. Second Row: Ass't Trainer Tom Bamette, John White, Bob Salyers Bill Gannon, Arthur 
Brooks. Pat Hickman, Paul Nichols. Jeff Ward, Leroy Whetsel, John Moore, John White, Don Hender- 
son, Ralph Felty, Buzz Daniels, Mgr. Dan Dove. Third Row : Coach Tom Kingery. Coach Rex Miller, 
Les Carver, Vic Marsh, Gary Grizzle, Don Lentz, Tom Lyons, Guy Gibbons, Bob Bradford. Roger 
Frazier, Les Lyons. Ed Meadows, Jim Tackett, Bill Brown, Coach Layman, Coach Curtis. Fourth Row: 
Ed Steil, Mike Harris, Steve Ward, Bill Culberetson, John Thomas, Buddy Figley, Bill Swimm, Frank 
Gibbons, Larry Sparks, Walt Mynhier, Bob Oakley, Ellis Gillnm, Larry Webb. 



it is necessary that there be separate and individual 
standards for each level. The knowledge and accept- 
ance of this fact dictates that officiating procedures 
in professional sports and for the school-college com- 
munity cannot be identical. 

While it may be perfectly justifiable for officials 
of professional games to tolerate abuse from profes- 
sionEil coaches, unsportsmanlike acts by school coaches 
and players cannot be permitted. The contention that 
abuse from coaches is excusable because it isn't per- 
sonal is, of course, a most ridiculous alibi. Nothing is, 
nor can be, more personal than a coach's or player's 
abuse of an official. Because such abuse is excused at 
the professional level, makes it in no way acceptable 
at the interscholastic level and it must not be tolerated 
there. 

This fact is increasingly important with the pre- 
sent coverage of Basketball Rule 10-7. Now both the 
coach and the fans are cognizant of how a baseketball 
coach is required to behave. In former years, the 
average fan may not have known what proper con- 
duct was for a coach. As a result, he may have sup- 
ported and "chimed in" when the coach vented his 
emotions on the offcials. 

At the present time, all knowledgeable basketball 
spectators and the officials know that the coach is 
wrong, both ethically and by rule, when he leaves the 
bench. The spectators are aware that the coach com- 
mits a foul by so doing and has, in effect, called it 
upon himself. 

The professionals are not particularly concerned 
with contributing to the education of those who par- 
ticipate in their games. By contrast, unless participa- 
tion in interscholastic athletics does contribute to the 
participant's education, there is no place for athlefics 
in the school program. Such contributions can, and 
will, be made only when coaches accept the decisions 
of officials promptly and consistently penalize those 
coaches who are violating the standards of the game. 

—Cliff Fagan, Nat'l Fed. Ex.-Sec'y. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky- 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
K.H.S.A.A. Building, Lexington, on Saturday 
morning, December 18, 1965. The meeting 
was called to order by President Foster J. 
Sanders at 10:00, with Board members Don 
Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, Sherman Gish, 
Preston Holland, Don R. Rawlings, and 
Gran C. Teater; and Assistant Commissioner 
J. B. Mansfield present. The invocation was 
given by Preston Holland. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by 
Gran C. Teater, that the reading of the 
minutes of the October 9th meeting be 
waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Assistant Commissioner, acting for 
Commissioner Ted Sanford who was unable 
to be present, reported that the 1965 foot- 
ball championship playoffs had been very 
successful. Ticket sales in the preliminary 
games and in the finals were good. He re- 
commended that each of the four teams 
participating in the playoffs in Lrcxington 
be allowed an additional amount of $200.00 
for incidental expenses. Don C. Davis moved, 
seconded by Preston Holland, that the ap- 
propriations recommended be allowed. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater, Chairman of the Trophy 
Committee, reported that his Committee had 



Page Eighteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



BELFRY — CLASS AA, REGION 4, DISTRICT 2. CHAMPION 




(Left CO R.sht^ Front Row: Mgrs. Donald Wallen and Greg Chapman, Mascot Robbie Vipperman, Mgrs. 
Darid Johnson and Kevin Vamey. Second Row: Harry Catron, Eugene Isom, Ken Small. Mike DeGeorge, 
Bob Bargett, Larry Hensley, Terry Varney, Donald Plummer. Ronald Martin, Frank Guyton, Leon 
Siggers, Eugene Hunt. Paul Hampton. Virgil Lockard, Coach Millard Bevins. Third Row: Coach Albert 
Vipperman, Wally Bevins, Jasper Webb, Jody TcKld, James Stepp. Donald Hacknev, Dannv Hatfield, 
Scotty Smith, Randy Scott, Freddy Warf, Leslie Estepp, Ronald Scott, Robert Taylor, James Runyon, 
Ronnie Brooks. Coach Frank AUara. Fourth Row: Paul May, Jimmy Sullivan. Calvin Durham, Freddy 
Atkins, Terry Scott, Leon Guyton, Mike Lowe, Jim Lowe, Randy Runyon, Mike Smith, Harold Borders, 
Greg Higgins, Jim Lockard, Larry Smith, David King. Gary Varney. 



met at the K.H.S.A.A. office on October 23, 
1965, at which time sealed bids for the 1966 
district and regional basketball trophies were 
opened. He stated that the Committee ac- 
cepted the bids of the Sport Shop, Glasgow, 
Kentucky, for both district and regional 
trophies. The price per set of the district 
trophies was $36.00 and $47.00 per set of 
regional trophies. 

The Assistant Commissioner reported 
that the Commissioner planned to divide the 
schools into three classes in track. Class 
AAA will be the schools in Jefferson County. 
The remaining schools will be placed in 
Classes A and AA. There will be four re- 
gions in Class AAA and eight in each of 
the other Classes. Don Davis moved, second- 
ed by Oran C. Teater, that in any class 
having less than eight regions, more than 
one contestant in eaoh event may represent 
the region so that eight contestants shall 
advance to the State Track Meet. The mo- 
ion was carried unanimously. 

The results of a baseball questionnaire 
sent out by the Commissioner were pre- 
sented. These questionnaires had been sent 
to other state offices. They concerned the 
number of games and innings a pitcher may 
pitch ; the number of games allowed during 
the season, and the selection of all-tourna- 
ment teams. 

The Assistant Commissioner read the 
correspondence concerning the Doug Parsons 
case which the Commissioner had asked the 
Board to review. In the opinion of the 
Board, By-Law 6, Section 3, does not ap- 
ply to the case of Doug Parsons, who at- 
tended school at Wayland High School in 
1964-65 and transferred to Betsy Layne 
High School this year. 



Don Davis moved, seconded by Preston 
Holland, that the 400-Yard Freestyle Relay 
replace the 200 yard event in the State 
Swimming Meets. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

President Sanders announced the oppoint- 
ment of Mrs. W. R. Bell, Rev. Richard 
Grenough, and Edgar McNabb to member- 
ship on the State Swimming Committee. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by 
Ralph C. Dorsey, that the next Board Meet- 
ing be held in Louisville on January 29, 1966. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Don 
Davis, that the summer meeting of the 
Board be held at Kenlake Hotel on July 
28, 1966. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Sherman Gish, that all bills of the Associa- 
tion for the period beginning October 1, 
1965, and ending November 30. 1965, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

mittee used the word "disposal" and this is 
interpreted to mean placing the ball on the 
floor at the designated spot when the lianded 
ball is refused. "Disposal" is used to con- 
note first attempting to hand the ball to 
the player, and then if it is not accepted, 
placing the ball on the floor. This applies 
either at the free-throw line when the ball 
is not accepted by the free thrower or out 
of bounds when it is not accepted by the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



Page Nineteen 



CAVERNA — BARREN RIVER EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Ballard, Dicky Daniell, Ricky Davis, Tim Tucker, Jerry Loesdon, 
Bruce Gentry, Paul Hay, Dennis Toms, David Johnson, Jerry Goodhue, Archie Hay, Mike Lawson. 
Second Row: Coach Jerome Ramsey, Bill Bastain, David Jackson, Sammy Thompson, Larry Wilkens, 
G. W. Esters, Dale Green, Dwayne Hatcher, Reecie Proffitt, Glen Clark, Randy Donselman, Burks 
McGlasson. 



designated thrower-in. 

8. Play: During a charged time-out sub- 
stitute A6 enters without reporting to the 
scorers or without being beckoned by an 
official. His entrance is not immediately 
noted, but it is discovered by the scorer or 
an official: (a) just before the ball is put 
in play; or (b) during a subsequent dead 
ball. 

Ruling: In (a) the infraction should be 
reported immediately and the free-throw 
for the technical foul awarded. In (b) the 
foul is discovered too late to assess a pen- 
ality. 

9. Play: Al prepares to make a throw- 
in. A2 legally takes position in front of Al 
inbounds within one foot of boundary line. 

Ruling: Legal. 

Comment: A2 is entitled to any position 
on the floor which he acquires legally. If a 
B player wants a position he must get there 
first. 

10. Play: Al prepares to make a throw- 
in. A2 legally takes position in front of Al 
inbounds within one foot of boundary line. 
A3, A4 and A5 line up behind A2 in tandom 
formation, perpendicular to the sideline. 

Ruling: Legal. 

11. Play: Team A ;has not occupied one 
of the second spaces along the free throw 
lane to which it is entitled in a free-throw 
situation. B3 moves into this space. After 
B3 has taken the space, A4 decides he wants 
it and pushes B3 out of position. 

Ruling: False double foul. A4 has com- 
mitted a foul when he pushed B3. If the 
pushing by A4 occurred before the ball has 
been Ihanded to or placed at the disposal of 
free thrower Al, it is a technical foul for 
unspsortsmanlike tactics. If the pushing 
occurs after the ball has been handed to or 
placed at the disposal of the free-thrower, 
A4 has committed an intentional personal 
foul. Play is resumed by a jump at the 



center circle after the last free-throw by 
player B3. 

12. Play : Is Play 7 of the 1965-66 Basket- 
ball Case Book, which is as follows, correct ? 
"Al scores a field goal, Bl retrieves the ball 
and is preparing to make the throw-in when 
Al requests a time-out. Ruling: the request 
should be granted. The ball is dead., there 
is no player control and the change-of -status 
is not imminent." 

Comment: Yes, the ruling is correct for 
the reasons given. That is, the ball is dead, 
there is no player control and the change- 
of-status is not imminent. If Bl were in his 
motion of passing the ball into the court, 
time-out would not be granted because 
chamge-of-status is imminent. The ruling in 
Case Book Play 7 is in conformance with 
the definition of the change-of-status and 
the coverage in Rule 5-8. 

13. Play: A6 reports to the scorer. He 
is ready and entitled to enter the game. 
Time for the end of the 2nd quarter expires 
before the ball next becomes dead. The 
scorer then sounds his signal to indicate a 
substitute is ready to enter. Must A6 com- 
plete the substitution? 

Ruling: A6 is not obliged to complete the 
substitution. If the official beckons him in- 
to the court and he enters, he has become 
a player. A6 is then eligible to start the 2nd 
half without further reporting and the play- 
er whom A 6 replaced mav reenter at the 
beginning of the 2nd half. However, it is 
not required that A6 complete the substitu- 
tion if he desires not to in this situation. 

14. Play: A6 reports to the scorer and 
is ready and entitled to enter the game. 
Play continues without the ball becoming 
dead and the clock stopping for a consider- 
able period of time, during which the game 
situation changes. This causes A6 to leave 
the scorer's table either voluntarily or at 



Page Twenty 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1966 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Dr. 



Lexington, Ky. 



Blazers-Adults (Kids Available) $18.95 ea. 

Trophies in stock at all prices — We engrave at our store 

We screen print our own sweat shirts 

2-3 week service — 36 minimum $ 1.95 ea. 

Ck)at Style Sweaters $12.95 & $13.95 

V-Neck white sweaters $ 8.25 & Up 

6" Chenille Letters Plain $ 1.35 ea. 

Adidas Track Shoes and Flats (in stock) 

#68 Baseballs (Excellent for Practice) $12.95 doz. 

Louisville Slugger & Adirondack (Pro) Bats in stock 

Most All Items for Baseball and Track in stock for Immediate Delivery 

CB9 "Corker" League Baseballs $17.95 doz. 

All Items quickly delivered by United Parcel 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



277-3977 



Dick Wallace 



the beckoning of his coach and to return to 
his players bench. 

Ruling: Even through A6 has reported 
to the scorer, it is not necessary that he 
complete the substitution. Since A6 is no 
longer at the scorers' table, the scorer should 
not signal the official for the substitution 
when the ball becomes dead and the clock 
stops. In effect, "A6 has withdrawn his 
substitition" although the phrase is not 
rules book language. 

15. Play: Team A has requested and has 
been granted a time-out. Coach A is con- 
ferring with his team near their bench. 
Coach of Team B asks the scorer to signal 
the official so that he may call the official's 
attention to what he believes to be a cor- 
rectable error. 

Ruling: Team A is entitled to its full 
time-out without interference and is charged 
for it. Following the notification that the 
time-out has expired, the scorer will notify 
the official of the request of the coach of 
team B. If the request of the coach of team 
B results in the prevention or correction of 



an error, no time-out is charged to team B. 
However, if no error has occurred nor no 
error is about to occur, or if it is too late 
to correct an error which has occurred, 
team B will be charged with a time-out. 
Team A is permitted its full time-out to 
prevent any attempt to exploit the intent of 
the rule. 

16. Play: The coach of team B has been 
granted the privilege of calling to the atten- 
tion of an official a correctable error. The 
official acknowledges that the correctable 
error has occurred, but it is too late to make 
the correction. One minute and 25 seconds 
been consumed by the official in inve&ti,gat- 
ing the situation and making his decision. 

Ruling: Team B is charged with one 
time-out. The fact that more than a minute 
was required by the official to make his 
decision is not considered to be the res- 
ponsibility of team B. The time-out is charg- 
ed to team B due to the fact that the coach 
was wrong in delaying the game to call at- 
tention to an error which could not be cor- 
rected. 



IF YOU ARE NOT USING OUR STUDENT COVERAGE 
NOW, A FEW MINUTES SPENT IN COMPLETING AND 
COMPARING THE CHART BELOW WILL SHOW 
WHETHER YOU SHOULD CONSIDER OUR POLICY 
FOR THE COMING YEAR. 



PRESENT OUR 
POLICY POLICY 



1. Accident Medical Expense Benefit — Maximum 

2. Limit for calls at doctor's office? 

3. Limit for X-rays or negative X-rays? 

4. Limit for Dental Expense, per tooth? 

5. Scheduled Surgery Benefits? 

6. Private Tutoring Benefit? 

7. Benefits payable regardless of other insurance? 

8. Coverage available on 24-hour basis? 

9. Available to employees? 

10. Does policy cover Athletics, except Football? 

11. Is Football Coverage available? 

12. Is policy approved by KHSAA? 

13. By Kentucky High School Football Coaches Ass'n? 

14. Is Claim Service prompt and is an interest shown 
in your special problems? 



$8,000 

NO 

NO 

NO 

NO 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 



NOTE: Items 2 through 5 provide for payment of reasonable 
and customary charges for services rendered. 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THESE 
COVERAGES, WE WILL BE HAPPY TO CALL ON YOU. 
JUST LET US KNOW. 



7<4e fCitu(f<lte4i> GomfMHif^ general agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 255-0837 



K. H. S. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 



District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following: 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 

No. ARX Last Bilt ball made by Spalding. 

Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament 

in Louisville. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams. All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistes, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and rect- 
angular glass backboards complete with oroals and nets in stock for at once 
delilvery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tiok-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play in our warehouse 
ready for immediate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium 
before tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, ED HENDLEY or C.A. BYRN, JR. are al- 
ways ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNTS 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
PHONE 451-0576 LOUISVILLE, KY. 

We SHiPlHf DaV Vou BuV 




CLASS A STATE CHAMPION LLOYD MEMORIAL 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Bob Wainscott, David Miller, Tom McClure, Dan Riley, 
Jerry Arnold, Tim Williams, Gerry Luken, Rick Hampton, Jim Roberts, Jerry King, Bill 
Embree, Mgr. Tim Hobbs. Second Row: Coach Jack Turner, Don Kuhn, John Roth, Mike 
Brown, Charles Vance, Dan Sterbling, Jim White, Mike Mann, Dan Miller, Mqr. Terry Roth. 
Third Row: Rusty Kordenbrock, Jon Long, Mike Cross, Bob McKay, Dick Wllmhoff, Terry 
Speagle, Sonny Dehner, Chuck Luken, Bill Brumback, Tim Wright, Richard Hance, Joe 
Ashley, Coach Roy Lucas. 



Lloyd 34-Carron County 7 
Lloyd 27-Dixie Heights 
Lloyd 19-Newport 
Lloyd 34-Bellevue 
Lloyd 23-CanipbeU County 



Lloyd 32-Ludlow 
Lloyd 59-Owen County 
Lloyd 46-Boone County 
Lloyd 48-Beechwood 7 
Lloyd 7-Dayton 18 



PLAYOFFS 



Lloyd 15-Mt. Sterling 14 
Lloyd le-FIeming Neon 13 
Lloyd 27-Old Kentucky Home 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY NIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

February, 1966 



Letter from the Commissioner 

To The District Tournament Manager: 
Will you please refer to your K.H.S.A.A. 
booklet which gives rules and regulations 
governing basketball tournaments. You 
should familiarize yourself vi^ith these rules, 
found on pages 27-35. Your special attention 
is called to the second paragraph of Tourna- 
ment Rule VI-A-3, relative to the enrollment 
of j'our disti'ict coaches in the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association. 

The forms for your varoius reports are 
self-explanatory. The report of games 
should be mailed to the manager of the 
regional tournament not later than Monday, 
March 7. Send your financial report, your 
checked eligibility lists, and the second copy 
of the report of games to the Commissioner 
as soon after the tournament as possible. For 
your convenience, the folloAving check list is 
given : 

1. Invite member schools to your tourn- 
ament AT ONCE, reminding each school to 
send each other member school in the dis- 
trict a COMPLETE preliminary list of play- 
ers on or before February 1, and to send you 
THREE copies of a final list one week prior 
to the district tournament. See Rule VHI. 

2. Announce the time of drawings in 
your letter. See Rule IX. 

3. At youi- meeting, conduct the draw- 
ings and select the officials. The state plan 
for division of tournament receipts is recom- 
mended. If any other plan is used, a majori- 
ty vote of the participating schools must be 
obtained. 

4. Your attention is called to the last 
paragraph of Tournament Rule V-A, which 
says: "An official shall not work a district 
or regional tournament in the district or re- 
gion in which he resides." Also note the new 
provisions of Tournament Rule V-C concern- 
ing twelve first team high school basketball 
games. 

5. The following procedure has been 
established by the Board of Control in the 
selection of tournament officials under au- 
thority given in Tournament Rule V-A: (a) 
Each school represented at the meeting may 
submit the names of one or more officials. 
There shall be a minimum of eight names 
on the list ol officials to be voted on. NO 
NAME SHALL BE MARKED OFF THE 
LIST, (b) Each school representative shall 
rank eight officials in the order of his pre- 
ference, the first choice being assigned eirfit 
points, the second seven points, etc. (c) The 
tournament manager shall communicate at 
once with the hisrhest ranking official or 
officials in order of their rank. If the official 
who is selected can not be reached within 
one hour of the time of his selection, or if 
he is not available, the tournament manager 



shall attempt to employ the next official or 
officials on the list in the order of their 
selection. If the tournament manager at- 
tempts to contact the official by telephone 
and there is no answer, the manager should 
check with the operator for a possible 
change in the official's number, (d) If two 
officials are tied on points, the highest rank- 
ing official shall be determined by flipping 
a coin, (e) If none of the officials on the list 
is available, the tournament manager shall 
have the sole responsibility of securing an 
official or officials for the tournament. 

6. Tournament Rule XV now says : "The 
Board of Control is authorized to select, 
standardize, and purchase trophies for all 
district and regional tournaments and the 
cost of these trophies shall be borne by the 
respective districts and regions." The Board 
has contracted with The Sport Shop, Glas- 
gow, Kentucky, to supply all of the official 
K.H.S.A.A. district first place and second 
place basketball trophies for the 1966 tourn- 
aments, each trophy complete with the Asso- 
ciation seal and engraving. Your trophies 
will be shipped to you prior to March 1. 

7. It is the responsibility of the tourna- 
ment manager to secure adequate police pro- 
tection. 

8. THE BOARD OF CONTROL HAS 
RULED THAT NOT MORE THAN 
TWELVE PLAYERS MAY BE IN UNI- 
FORM FOR ANY ONE TOURNAMENT 
GAME, AND THAT OTHER SOUAD 
MEMBERS SHALL NOT BE ALLOWED 
TO PARTICIPATE IN WARM-UP EXER- 
CISES, THIS BEING IMPLIED IN TOURN- 
AMENT RULE XI. 

9. Please ask your officials to designate 
the goals prior to the warm-up time for each 
game. 

10. You will receive three copies of a 
final eligibility list from each school. Have 
one of these checked by the coach of each 
competing team, before his team plays, for 
the twelve players he will use in each game. 
Use only one list for checking players on 
each team since the other two copies may be 
needed by the regional and state tournament 
managers. Send the Commissioner all of 
these checked copies with your other re- 
ports. Send the two unchecked conies of 
eligibility lists of the winner and runner-up 
to the manager of your regional tournament, 
along with one conv of vour report of games, 
not later than March 7. 

11. It has been ruled that the 2:00 
o'clock mentioned in Tournament Rule IV-B 
mav be considered Eastern St^mdard time 
or 1 :00 P.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME. 
This information concerning the starting 
time of the regional meeting should be giv- 

( Continued on Page Nine) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. xxvni— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 



Basketball Questions 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside 
or modify any rule. They are interpretations for some 
of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

17. Play: The request of the coaoh of team B that 
the scorer signal an official so that the coach may call 
attention to a correctable error Is granted. The official 
decides that the situation related by the coach was 
either not an error, not correctable, or reported too 
late to be corrected. 

Ruling: Time-out is charged to team B. 

18. Play: While the ball is dead and the clock is 
stopped, coach of team A asks the scorer to signal 
the official so that he, the coach, may have a confer- 
ence with tlie official at the scoring table for the pur- 
pose of calling attention to a correctable error. The 
scorer appears reluctant to signal the official for the 
conference. 

Ruling: The scorer is required to respond to the 
coach's request. It is not for the scorer to decide the 
validity of a coach's request. The coach must assume 
full responsisbOity and the scorer must be instructed 
by the referee to carry out the request of a coach 
made while the clock is stopped and the ball is dead. 

19. Play: With the score A 70 - B 71, the time 
expires for the 4th quarter. A technical foul is called 
on a player of team B before the official certifies that 
the game is over. 

Ruling: Team A is required to attempt the free 
throw for the technical foul immediateUy. If the free- 
throw is successful, the score is tied and there will be 
an overtime. The overtime will start with a jump ball 
at the center. The throw-in aspect of the penalty for 
the technical foul is ignored. 

20. Play: Al is awarded a free throw attempt. Bl 
stations himself at the top of the free-throw circle. Al, 
after his free-throw attempt, backs into or turns and 
runs into Bl. 

Ruling: Al is responsible for the contact. Bl is 
legally entitled to the position he has taken at the top 
of the free throw circle. 

21. Play: Al holds B2. The referee indicates a 
foul. A2 Tciises his hand and the scorer charges A2 
with 'he foul. Coaoh of team B recognizes this error. 

Ruling: This situation, that is, the charging of a 
foul to the wrong player, is not listed as a correctable 
error in 2-10, and, therefore, the coach is not permitted 
the privilege of a conference with the officials for 
p-i'pose.s of bringing such an error to their attention. 
However, the coach can apprise the officials of the 
situation in several ways. He may have his captain 
relay the information to the referee or umpire, or he 
could send in a substitute who would ask the captain 
to call the matter to the attention of the official, or it 
would be permissible for the coach to go to the scorer's 
table (as provided by Rule 10, Section 7, that has to 
do with the coach leaving the bench to carry out ne- 
cessary coaching duties) to report the error to the 
scorer so that the scorer, in turn, could review it with 
the officials. 

22. Play: Al and Bl cause a held ball. Team B 



is granted a time-out before the ball again becomes 
alive via the jump ball. Tall A2 takes a position in 
the circle in preparation to jump with Bl. May the 
coach of team B appesd this situation to the official? 

Ruling: No. This is not Usted under Rule 2-10 as a 
correctable error. However, the captain may respect- 
fully ask the official to check this matter. 'The coach, 
from the bench, can call his captain's (or players') 
attention to the error, without an infraction. There is 
no provision in the rule which wiU enable the coach 
to call this matter directiy to the official's attention, 
nor can the situation be corrected after the jump ball. 

23. Play: Prior to a free throw attempt by Al, B6 
replaces B2. The attempt by Al is successful. B2 re- 
ports to the scorer and desires to reenter. 

Ruling: B2 may not reenter before the next oppor- 
tunity to substitute after the clock has been started 
following his replacement. 

24. Play: Al is holding the ball prior to any drib- 
ble by him. He places the ball on the floor in front of 
him and then straightens to an upright position, after 
Which he reaches down to the floor and picks up the 
ball. 

Ruling: Legal. However, if Al subsequenUy dribbles 
he has committed a violation. 

25. Play: After the ball has been placed at the dis- 
posal of a free thrower and before the free throw has 
been attempted: (a) Bl and B2 exchainge places by 
crossing through the free throw lane; or (b) A2 comes 
across the top of the circle to slap Al on the back 
and to offer him some encouragement. 

Ruling: Violation in both (a) and (b). In (a), the 
"call" would be delayed until Al had completed his 
free throw attempt, and if the free throw was success- 
ful, this action by B would be ignored. If the free 
throw was not successful, a substitute throw would be 
awarded. In (b), this violation by A2 immediately 
ended the free throw and, unless it was a two-shot 
free throw or a free throw for a technical foul, the 
ball would be awarded to B out out of bounds on a 
throw-in. 

26. Play: After the official has handed the ball to 
free thrower Al or placed it at his disposal, coach of 
team A comes to the scorer's bench and requests a 
conference with the floor officials for the purpose of 
correcting an error. 

Ruling: The scorer should not signal the official 
in this situation. If he inadvertently does so, the 
official must not grant the coach's request for a con- 
ference. 

27. Play: Al is tnbounds while holding the ball near 
a side line. Bl is standing on the side Une when he 
touches: (a) the ball; or (b) Al. 

Ruling: In (a), Bl has caused the ball to be out 
of bounds and the ball is, therefore, awarded to team 
A for a throw-in. In (b), the touching of Al does not 
cause the ball to be out of bounds. 

28. Play: Bl commits a bonus penalty foul against 
Al. While the official is taking the ball to the fi-ee 
throw line, A3 commits a non-flagrant contact foul. 

Ruling: Foul by A3 is technical and the situation 
results in a false double foul. If the first free thi-ow 
attempt by Al is successful, he Is allowed a second 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



FEBRUARY, 196K 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 7 



Poblished monthly, except Jane and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. LexinETton. Ky. 40Sai 

Second class postage paid at Lexinirton. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Aasistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexinrton. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Don Davis 
(1963-67). independence; Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66). Horse 
Cave: Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68). Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate ;i.90 Per Year 

J>iom the Commissionei s (Z/jfice 

1966 District Tournament Sites 

1. Fulton 34. Covington Cath. 

2. Rei(Jland 35. Newport 

3. Wingo 36. Highlan<Js 

4. Murray College 37. Harrison County 

5. Lyon County 38. Bracken County 

6. Webster County 39. Mason County 

7. West Hopkins 40. St. Agatha Acad. 

8. Christian County 41. Frankfort 

9. Owensboro 42. Harrodsburg 

10. Muhlen. Central 43. Tates Creek 

11. Ohio County 44. Model 

12. Leitchfield 45. Garrard County 

13. Russellville 46. Russell County 

14. College 47. Somerset 

15. Austin-Tracy 48. London 

16. Metcalfe County 49. Clay County 

17. Elizabethtown 50. Williamsburg 

18. Memorial 51. Bell County 

19. Bardstown 52. Wallins 

20. Adair County 53. Fleming Neon 

21. Western 54. Hazard 

22. Ahrens 55. Carr Creek 

23. Southern 56. Lee County 

25. Louisville Male 57. Inez 

26. Waggener 58. Betsy Layne 

27. St. Xavier 59. Pikeville 

29. Shepherdsville 60. Elkhom City 

30. Henry County 61. Breckinridge Tr. 

31. Oldham Countv 62. Hitchins 

32. Grant County 63. Greenup 

33. Lloyd 64. Paul G. Blazer 

1966 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State College, (2) Webster 
County High School, (3) Owensboro Sports- 
center, (4) Western Kentucky State College 
(5) Taylor County High School, (6) Freedom 
Hall, (7) Freedom Hall, (8) Henry County 
High School, (9) Campbell County High 
School, (10) Mason County High Scliool, 
(11) Ea-stern Kentucky State College, (12) 
Danville, (13) Whitley County High School, 
(14) Breathitt County High School, (15) 
Prestonburg High School, (16) Morehead 
State College. 



News About Swimming 

The 1966 Class AAA State High Soliool 
Swimming Meet will be held at the Planta- 
tion Swim Club pool, 8609 Westport Road, 
Louisville on Friday evening and Saturday, 
February 25-26. There will be separate di- 
visions for boys and girls. The two divisions 
for Class AA, representing the smaller 
schools, are scheduled to be held at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky pool, Lexington, on 
March 25-26. 

Class AAA will include those high 
schools with an enrollment of 800 or more 
(grades 10-12), and Class AA will 
include those schools with an enrollment of 
less than 800. All-male or all-female schools 
with an enrollment of 400 or more are placed 
in Class AAA. Any school may enter a class 
above its classification. 

General regulations concerning the 
meets, as adopted by the Board of Control, 
appeared in the September issue of the 
ATHLETE. All rules appearing in the 1966 
scholastic section of the N.C.A.A. Swimming 
Guide will be followed unless there is some 
difference between these regulations and 
those adopted by tihe Board of Control. In 
such an event, K.H.S.A.A. rules will prevail. 
In its December meeting the Board of Con- 
trol replaced the 200- Yd. Freestyle Relay 
with the 400-Yd. Freestyle Relay, to comply 
with national recommendations. Attention is 
called to the fact that a contestant may en- 
ter three events, no more than two of which 
may be individual events. This K.H.S.A.A. 
rule differs from the N.C.A.A. rule. 

Only those swimmers who qualify for 
the finals will be given expense allowances 
for transportation, lodging and meals. 

STATE TOURNAMENT OFFICIALS 

The plan for the selection of State 
Basketball Tournament officials recommend- 
ed by the Board of Control to the Tourna- 
ment Manager for the 1965 tournament will 
also be used for the forthcoming 1966 
tournament. It is as follows: 

1. The Commissioner will send the 
names of all resident Kentucky Certified 
officials to K.H.S.A.A. principals. 

2. Head basketball coaches must rank 
eight (8) officials from this list. 

3. Principals will send the ballots to the 
Commissioner who will tabulate them. 
Points shall be as follows : 8-, 7, 6, etc. 

4. The official who is top ranked by the 
coaches in each section (two regions) will 
officiate in the State Tournament. In case of 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



Page Three 



a tie vote, the winner shall be determined 
by lot. 

5. If an official receives the highest 
ratings by the coaches in two sections, the 
official who receives the next highest rat- 
ing in the two sections shall also officiate in 
the State Tournament. 

6. Assignment in the State Tournament 
will be the responsibility of the Commis- 
sioner. 

7. The Commissioner will notify the 
elected officials. 

8. If the official w^ho is top ranked by 
the coaches in a section can not work, then 
the second ranked official will be selected. 



Football Clinic 

The Louisville Football Coaches Associ- 
ation will conduct its annual clinic, the 
Louisville Championship Football Clinic, in 
Louisville on April 15-16, 1966, during 
K.E.A. week. 

High School coaches on the program 
will be: Coach Bob Dunaway, Coojoer High 
School, Vicksburg, Mississippi; Ron Cain, 
Seneca High School. Louisville; and Dick 
Walker, Waterson High School, Columbus, 
Ohio. 

The first session of the clinic will be 
held at Trinity High School, St. Matthews, 
Kentucky, on Friday evening, beginning at 
6:30. College coachess will speak at this 
session. The Saturday session will be held at 
the Medical Arts Building, Eastern Parkway, 
Louisville, beginning at 9:00 A.M. This ses- 
sion will end at 3 :00 P.M. 

The tuition for each person in attend- 
ance, prior to April 1, will be $3.00. It will 
be $5.00 at the door. Advanced registrations 
should be mailed to Coach Charles W. Kuhn, 
1103 South Chesley Drive, Louisville 19, 
Kentucky. 



K.H.S.C.A. Notice 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr of the 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
calls to the attention of Principals, Athletic 
Directors, and Coaches that membership in 
the K.H.S.C.A. runs from March 1, 1966, to 
February 28, 1967. Two coaches in each 
school have their fees paid from district 
basketball tournament receipts. Other 
coaches should mail their aDDlications, along 
with their fees of SI. 00 each, to Mr. Ohr, 
whose address is Irvine High School, Irvine, 
Kentucky. 



In Memoriam 




R. A. Belt 

On the night of January 8, R. A. Belt 
had witnessed a close basketball game 
between his home school team, the Dawson 
Springs Panthers and the South Hopkins 
Tomcats. He went to his office located in the 
school and sat down at his desk where, while 
probably reviewing mentally the game he 
had just witnessed, he died "with his boots 
on" in the surroundings he loved so well. He 
had often expressed the wish that this 
would be the manner of his passing. 

Mr. Belt began his teaching career at 
Greenville in 1919. He moved to Fordsville 
in January, 1920, and took over teaching 
and coaching chores, remaining there for 
two years. His next assignment was as 
teacher and coach at Tolu for a period of 
nine years. During this period his teams 
were winners of the Regional Tournament in 
1930 and 1931. They advanced to the State 
semi-finals in 1930, and to the finals in 1931. 

His next period of service was at Fre- 
donia from 1931 until 1936. when he became 
Sunerintendent of the Dawson Springs 
School System, leaving off coaching duties 
for full time administration. Several months 
ago he was awarded a plaque for having the 
lontrest tenure as a Kentucky School Super- 
intendent. 

Mr. Belt was a native of Crittenden 
Countv and was a Navy Veteran of World 
War I. He was a graduate of the University 
of Kentucky and a member of Phi Beta 
Kaooa. He was honored and re=ipected by his 
associates in the Educational field. The hun- 
dreds of former studen+s nassing under his 
suoervi^ion will lone hold him in fond mem- 
ory for his dp'dication and efforts in fulfilling 
their educational needs. — S.B.P. 



Pago Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 

What a difference a year can make! 
Early in 1965 the Dutchman wrote the fol- 
lowing about the erstwhile sports official, 
Ben Edelen, who is now an income tax con- 
sultant: "About this time of the year 
coaches, sports writers, principals and offi- 
cials from all over Kentucky beat a path to 
Ben's plush offices in Buechel. They hope 
for refunds from Uncle Sam but are assured 
only a free cup of instant coffee from "Ole 
Ben." How this chap can smile as he says, 
"No refund for you ; you still owe," is 
beyond the comprehension of the usual 
jovial Charlie Ruter, Johnnie Carrico, Joe 
Billy and the Dutchman." This comment 
must have touched the former whistler be- 
cause "Ole Ben" has reversed the order for 
these "four horsemen" and is saying, "Uncle 
Sam owes you ; now will you have a free 
cup of coffee or are you still bothered by last 
year's ulcers?" 

Ben Edelen has devoted one wall of his 
office to pictures of sportsmen who have 
both won and lost in the "Internal Checker 
Game" with Uncle Sam. On the "Wailing 
Wall" are pictures of Umle Ed, Der Baron, 
Peck Hickman, Earl Kuby, Dean Eagle and 
Pee Wee Reese, among many others. Get 
your picture there and then dn the "Refund 
Shuffle" when it comes back rather than 
goes to our bearded Uncle. 

Seeing Pee Wee's picture on Ben's 
"Wailing Wall" recalls a gull story told to 
Pee Wee and the Dutchman at Hillerich and 
Bradsby's annual World Series dinner this 
month by "Junie" Hillerich. Junie operates 
the Louisville Slugger "House of bats and 
golf clubs" when he is not golfing. 

As a kid, Junie caddied at the Audubon 
Goll Club. One day an elderly gentleman 
hit a drive on a par three hole which stopped 
only a few feet from the cup so Junie gave 
it a helpful little kick to score a "hole in 
one." When the old gentleman found his ball 
in the cuji he was so happy that Junie de- 
cided to do this more often and spread lots 
of happiness. The result was a rash of 
"holes in one" at this one hole on this one 
course. At dinner one evening his dad, the 
elder Hillerich, was concerned and confused 
wondering how so many "aces" could be 
scored at the same golf course. It was then 
that voung Junie Hillerich courted disaster 
by telling how helpful his educated toe had 
been. Plates started to fly as his dad, the 
owner of the Louisville Slugger Company, 
"blew his stack." The cold hard fact was 
that Hillerich and Bradsby was giving a set 
of woods and irons to anybody scoring a 



"hole in one," and young Junie's toe 'had 
really put a crimp in the profits of the bat 
and golf club manufacturer. 

Each month somebody nominates Dan- 
ville's Don Rawlings for a Com Cob Pipe 
award. The Danville Principal, who is a 
member of the Board of Control, won this 
award more than a year ago — and nobody 
will ever deserve it more. You've got a lot 
of friends, Don! 

When Kentucky's sports history is writ- 
ten, it must record that Paducah's Otis Din- 
ning is one of the greatest Kentuckians ever 
to tread across the campus of Western Ken- 
tucky State College or to lead a gang of 
eager schoolboy competitors onto a basket- 
ball floor. Because of the leadership Otis has 
given to hundreds of boys and girls, this fine 
coach is honored with the Corn Cob Pipe for 
the month of January, 1966. 

The Abou Ben Adhem award goes to a 
mountain school this month. Principal Paul 
Trimble, Coach Jim Wheeler and Oran Tea- 
ter of Paintsville High may well be proud 
that sports officials have written the Dutch- 
man to say that the courteous treatment 
accorded them at that sportsmanship center, 
plus the neighborly attitude of its students 
and fans, causes them to select Paintsville 
for the Abou Ben Adhem citation. May your 
tribe increase! The Dutchman doffs his fe- 
dora to Oran Teater and his staff who are 
serious about building character and out- 
standing sports at the same time. 

Only two months remain for you to 
nominate the courageous bov or girl who is 
overcoming a physical handicap in your area 
for the Game Guv Award. Let the Dutchman 
know of the handicapped lads and lassies, as 
well as the sports in which they are engag- 
ing so he can inform Kentucky and award 
them the lionheart statuettes. 

Bob Gour of Bowling Green sends on 
the information that the Park City has 
started an Officials Association. One by one 
these associations are beginning to blanket 
Kentucky. Bob also wants the Dutchman to 
tell him when a goal counts when the game 
ends with the ball in the air. O.K., Bob, here 
goes! 

Any time the ball is in the air on a le- 
gitimate try when the game ends, the goal 
will count unless it is subsequently touched 
by a player, thus endinor the trv. If basket 
interference or goal tending by the defensive 
team takes nlace, the goal counts. If, how- 
ever, the ball hits a plaver or the floor and is 
in t^e air when the period ending sional 
sounds, the basket will not count because 
the try ended when the ball touched the 
player or the floor. It is possible to score 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



Page Five 



Football Officials' Ratings On Sportsmanship Of 
K. H. S. A. A. Member Schools - 1965 



SCHOOL 



Anderson 

Atherton 

Austin-Tracy 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bath County 

Beech wood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Bishop David 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 

Bryan Station 

Burgrin 

Butler 

Caldwell County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Carroll County 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Christian County 

Corbin 

Crittenden County _. 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dayton 

DeSales 

Dixie Heights 

duPont Manual 

Durrent 

Eastern 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 



En 

Evarts 

Fairdale 

Falmouth 

Fern Creek 

Fla&et 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Ft. Campbell 

Ft. Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gamaliel 

Garrard County 

George Rogers Clark 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Hall 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Henry County 

Highlands 

Hiseville 

Holmes 

Hopkinsville 

Iroquois 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

K. M. I. 

Ky. School for Deaf . 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

LaRue County 

Lebanon 









OTHER 


SCHOOL 
















COACH 




OFFICIALS 






CROWD 






TEAM 


G 


F 


P 


E G 


F 


p 


E 


G 


F 


p 


E 


G 


F 


5 


5 


1 


31 


8 





4 


30 


9 







30 


12 


1 ; 


3 


1 





37 


4 








33 


7 







35 


6 





9 








16 


8 








12 


11 







16 


8 


\ 


3 








19 


1 








18 


2 







17 


3 





13 


1 





37 


10 








30 


15 







32 


13 


2 


6 








31 


6 








26 


8 




1 


28 


7 


2 


3 


3 





27 








1 


21 


6 







22 


5 


1 : 


6 


2 





37 


6 








36 


5 







33 


8 


1 


2 


3 





34 


2 








33 


3 







32 


4 





7 


1 


1 


35 


4 








27 


11 







30 


9 


1 


4 


1 





29 


2 








26 


6 







25 


4 


1 


16 


1 


4 


31 


14 


1 


1 


31 


16 




u 


33 


14 


1 


8 








31 


8 








27 


10 







25 


10 


3 


5 


3 





38 


2 








37 


3 







35 


4 


1 


10 


4 





28 


9 


1 





25 


8 




1 


23 


11 


1 ; 


12 


2 


3 


24 


14 








20 


17 




1 


22 


14 


'' 1 


6 








34 


4 








28 


10 







30 


7 


" 


8 


2 


1 


36 


6 








34 


7 







30 


8 


2 1 


8 


1 


3 


18 


7 





1 


14 


9 




1 


15 


9 


1 i 


7 


1 


1 


44 


6 








40 


7 







43 


7 


' 


6 


2 


2 


31 


5 








28 


8 







30 


6 


« 1 


8 


1 





30 


6 








25 


10 







28 


9 


« 1 


8 








39 


5 








33 


10 







34 


11 





11 


4 


9 


18 


9 


5 





14 


13 




1 


13 


19 


s 1 


9 


1 





28 


7 








26 


8 




2 


23 


12 


1 ! 


9 








17 


4 








9 


10 







13 


8 


1 


13 


3 





18 


13 


2 





16 


16 


1 





12 


17 


•* ! 


2 








32 


2 








30 


4 







28 


6 


« 


5 








34 


2 








29 


7 







28 


8 


1 


3 








34 


5 








30 


e 




1 


25 


8 


" 1 


6 





1 


22 


6 








21 


6 







20 


5 


•' 


5 








16 


5 








14 


6 







17 


3 


1 


3 


2 


1 


30 


3 








27 


5 







28 


5 





7 


4 


2 


23 


10 





1 


24 


10 







20 


13 


1 


8 








28 


3 








23 


8 







22 


9 


" 


8 


9 


2 


32 


8 


6 


2 


33 


10 







32 


13 


1 


10 


(i 


1 


22 


9 


4 


2 


20 


17 







22 


15 





9 








40 


5 


2 


1 


35 


11 







37 


10 





13 


4 





37 


12 


1 





35 


14 







33 


16 


1 1 


18 


2 


2 


38 


16 








28 


20 




2 


36 


17 


1 i 


7 


6 





29 


10 








26 


13 








27 


6 


6 


15 








30 


12 








26 


16 







25 


17 





16 


1 





24 


10 


1 





18 


16 







24 


11 





4 


1 





37 


4 








36 


4 







36 


4 


1 


12 


2 


5 


32 


11 








29 


15 







20 


17 


6 


5 


1 


1 


23 


5 








20 


8 





1 


21 


4 


1 


11 


2 





37 


11 








33 


14 








27 


18 


1 


14 


3 


2 


42 


16 








41 


17 








40 


18 





3 








28 


2 








29 


2 








28 


2 


1 


3 








39 


2 








35 


8 








34 


9 





1 








29 











27 


2 








27 


2 





4 








38 


5 








36 


7 








36 


7 





6 


3 





39 


4 








35 


7 


1 





37 


5 


1 


12 


2 


1 


34 


4 








32 


6 








27 


9 


2 


3 








31 


2 








30 


3 








30 


3 





3 








33 


2 








29 


6 








32 


3 














27 











27 











23 


4 





10 








15 


10 








13 


9 


3 





14 


g 


3 


5 


5 


5 


25 


6 





6 


19 


9 


1 


6 


17 


9 


7 


9 


1 





30 


6 








27 


8 


1 





30 


5 


1 


6 


1 


3 


31 


4 








27 


3 


3 


2 


27 


3 


2 


6 








41 


5 








37 


9 








36 


10 





8 


3 


1 


29 


4 


1 





27 


7 








24 


8 


1 


2 








21 


2 








20 


3 








22 


1 





4 


1 





23 


4 








21 


5 





1 


22 


4 


1 


7 





7 


47 


3 


1 





42 


7 


2 





42 


7 


2 


2 








36 


1 








36 


2 








33 


2 


1 


4 


1 


3 


23 


4 





2 


23 


2 


1 


3 


21 


7 


1 


2 








23 


3 








23 


3 








23 


3 





4 


1 





28 


6 








21 


13 








19 


13 


1 


8 


5 


2 


31 


8 


1 





28 


12 








26 


14 





2 








39 


2 








38 


3 








38 


3 





9 








21 


10 








18 


14 








22 


10 





5 


5 


2 


30 


1 


2 





28 


4 


1 





28 


4 


1 


7 








17 


7 








14 


9 


1 





15 


8 


1 


12 








29 


7 








22 


12 


2 





23 


10 


3 


3 








48 


3 








46 


6 








50 


1 





4 


1 





6 


5 








6 


6 








6 


6 





6 


1 





27 


7 








24 


6 


2 





24 


9 


1 


9 


1 





3fi 


7 








36 


7 








34 


9 





6 





1 


30 


4 








29 


4 





1 


30 


4 











1 


12 





1 





12 





1 





9 


3 





12 








33 


10 








31 


11 


1 





31 


11 


1 











16 











16 











15 


1 





1 








25 











25 


1 








23 


3 





3 


3 





31 


2 








29 


4 








30 


2 





U 


1 





36 


10 


1 





33 


13 


1 





34 


13 





10 


1 





31 


6 


3 


1 


26 


13 





1 


28 


12 






Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



Leslie County 
Lib- 



Lincoln Institute 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Loyall 

Ludlow . 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp 

McKeil 

M. C. Napier 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Madisonville 

Male 

Mavfield 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesboro 

M. M. I. 

Morgan County 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas County 

North Hardin 

North Warren 

Old Ky. Home 

Oldham County 

Owen County 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic __„ 

Padui^ih Tilghman 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park Citv 

Paul G. Blazer 

P. I.. Dunbar 

Pike 



illc 

Pleasure Eidge Park 

Prestonsburg 

Raceland 

Rowan County 



Sayr 



Shawnee 

Shelby County -_. 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Simon Kenton 

Somerset 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Tates Creek 

Temple Hill 

Thomas Jefferson 
Tompkinsville — . 

Trigg County 

Trinitj- 

Union County 

Valley 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Warren County 

Western 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Whitley County _. 

Williamsburg 

Woodford County 
Wurtland 



SK 


2 


2 





29 


3 








28 


4 








28 


3 


1 


?.(\ 


7 


1 


1 


24 


2 





1 


22 


4 





3 


21 


3 


1 


11 


6 


2 


2 


11 


6 


2 


2 


12 


6 


2 


1 


11 


ft 


2 


3?. 


17 


4 





36 


17 








33 


15 


2 


4 


31 


15 


3 


3?, 


4 








35 


1 








32 


4 








27 


9 





13 


9 


3 


7 


19 


13 








15 


15 


2 





19 


11 


2 


SS 


13 


1 


1 


30 


10 








27 


12 







31 


9 





?.n 


2 





1 


20 


2 





1 


21 


2 







20 


2 


1 


34 


3 


1 





32 


4 


2 





30 


8 







30 


8 





27 


16 


2 





30 


15 








29 


15 







27 


15 


1 


35 


1 


1 





26 


1 








26 


1 







23 


3 





?J, 


1 


1 





24 


2 


1 





19 


7 







16 


8 


3 


f.1 


5 


2 





24 


8 


1 





24 


9 







22 


9 


2 


as 


7 








27 


7 





1 


26 


8 







27 


7 


1 


23 


9 








24 


7 


1 





22 


9 







21 


10 


1 


25 


4 








25 


4 








24 


5 







25 


4 





3S 


9 


2 





41 


8 








38 


10 







37 


11 





25 


5 








25 


5 








24 


5 







26 


4 





24 


7 








24 


6 








23 


8 







21 


10 





19 


10 


1 





19 


10 








19 


9 







21 


8 


1 


34 


6 


4 


1 


39 


6 


1 





34 


7 




3 


35 


6 


4 


31 


2 








37 


1 








32 


1 







30 


3 





25 


6 








26 


5 








23 


7 







18 


12 


1 


39 


5 








41 


3 








38 


5 







38 


6 





16 


5 








18 


2 








13 


8 







14 


7 





37 


3 








38 


2 








38 


2 







38 


2 





34 


9 


1 





36 


8 








31 


13 







32 


10 


2 


2K 


5 


1 





31 


3 








26 


8 







28 


6 





30 


2 


5 


1 


33 


5 








31 


6 







28 


7 


3 


44 


4 








43 


6 








35 


12 







44 


4 





H 


10 


2 





12 


9 







6 


15 








8 


12 


1 


54 


13 


3 





64 


6 








55 


16 


2 





62 


7 





32 


10 








30 


9 


1 


2 


29 


11 


2 





30 


10 


2 


2ft 


8 








28 


5 








20 


13 








22 


10 


1 


20 


7 


1 





16 


7 





6 


15 


9 


1 


3 


14 


9 


4 


32 


3 








29 


6 








27 


8 








26 


9 





33 


4 


1 





36 


2 








35 


3 








34 


3 


1 


30 


6 


1 





32 


6 








28 


9 








26 


1(1 


1 


24 


7 


4 


2 


28 


6 


2 


1 


26 


8 


s 





23 


8 


3 


10 


11 


1 


1 


15 


7 


1 




13 


10 








15 


7 


1 


36 


3 








35 


4 








33 


6 








33 


6 





21 


8 


3 


1 


20 


9 


2 


2 


19 


7 


3 


4 


18 


9 


4 


32 


8 


2 





33 


8 


1 




32 


10 








30 


11 





2K 


6 








29 


4 








27 


3 


1 


2 


27 


6 





34 


6 








33 


6 


1 





30 


10 








31 


8 


1 


2ft 


8 





1 


27 


7 








21 


8 


5 





21 


7 


2 


21 


6 








18 


6 


2 





19 


6 


1 





20 


6 





24 


1 


1 


2 


25 


3 








21 


6 


1 





23 


4 


1 


27 


6 


1 


3 


28 


3 





4 


21 


10 


5 





19 


15 


2 


22 


4 


4 


3 


28 


3 


2 





24 


5 


1 


3 


24 


4 


1 


32 


11 


3 


1 


35 


12 








28 


15 


4 





36 


11 





29 


12 


1 





32 


9 


1 





30 


11 


1 





31 


8 


2 


20 


4 


3 


4 


26 


4 


1 





25 


5 


1 





22 


8 





25 


20 


5 


3 


36 


17 








32 


18 


3 





27 


18 


6 


29 


9 


1 





28 


11 








28 


11 








27 


9 


2 


27 


9 


1 





28 


8 








25 


11 








26 


9 


2 


37 


4 


1 





38 


4 








35 


7 








38 


3 


1 


40 


4 








40 


4 








36 


7 


1 





35 


8 


1 


4 











3 











3 











4 








27 


6 


1 





32 


2 








26 


6 


1 


1 


27 


7 





30 


12 


1 





32 


11 








28 


15 








28 


11 


3 


30 


5 


1 


1 


31 


5 








28 


7 


2 





31 


5 


1 


36 


4 








35 


4 


1 





30 


7 


1 


2 


35 


5 





14 


3 


2 


1 


18 


2 








16 


4 








16 


4 





13 


8 


2 


2 


16 


7 


1 


1 


16 


8 





1 


15 


9 





IX 


13 


3 


8 


27 


14 





1 


26 


14 


2 


1 


23 


15 


4 


22 


9 


2 





25 


7 








19 


12 





1 


20 


10 


1 


24 


3 


1 


1 


27 


2 








26 


3 








28 


4 


1 


26 


15 


2 


1 


30 


13 


1 





28 


14 


2 





30 


13 





32 


5 








27 


10 








25 


12 








23 


13 


1 


37 


9 


1 





39 


S 








38 


8 


1 





39 


9 





3X 


5 








38 


5 








35 


8 








39 


4 





IK 


1 








18 


1 








17 


2 








17 


2 





31 


3 








29 


5 








30 


2 


2 





28 


5 





33 


15 





2 


36 


13 


1 





34 


15 





1 


29 


17 


2 


20 


10 


8 


8 


32 


14 








29 


16 


1 





30 


13 


3 


24 


9 


3 





27 


9 








21 


8 


5 


2 


19 


11 


5 


13 


10 


2 





22 


3 








19 


« 








15 


8 


2 


3 











2 











3 











3 








24 











24 











24 











21 


3 





30 


2 


2 





31 


3 








29 


4 


1 





31 


3 





19 


7 


3 


2 


24 


5 





2 


18 


9 





4 


19 


7 


2 



Schools' Ratings On 
Football Officials 

The following ratings were received on football 
officials registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1965-1966. 
The numbers foUowing each nEune represents respect- 
ivelj the number of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor 
ratings given to the official. 



Adams, Calvin K., 0-3-1-0; Adkins, James A., Jr., 
2-5-1-0; Adkins, WendeU L., 1-1-0-0; Albright, James R., 
7-34-1; Allen, Clyde E., Jr., 0-1-0-0; Anders, Raleigh 
A., 5-11-2-2; Anderson, E. W., Jr., 6-5-0-0; Atkinson, 
Charlie, 8-2-1-0; Ausmus, WiUiam, 0-1-0-0; 

Ballaban, Thomas, 2-1-0-0; Barbour, Morris, 0-1-0-0; 
Barlow, Bill B., 7-4-2-0 Bartels, John T., 1-5-2-0; Beck, 
C. Norman, 3-5-1-0; Beheler, Donald Stuart, 6-4-1-0; Bell 
Clarence T., 1-1-1-0; Bennett, Howard, 2-2-0-0; Benton, 
James L., 0-4-0-0; Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., 14-0-1; Bero, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1%6 



Page Seven 



James J., 0-1-0-0; Bivins, George W., 4-3-O-0; Black- 
burn, Adrian, 2-4-1-0; Blackburn, Tennyson R., 0-1-0-0; 
Blanton, Homer, 5-1-1-0; Blosser, Kermit A.,1-(WW); 
Bocook, Earl, 2-0-0-0; Boeh, Bill, 6-8-2-0; Boemker, Bob, 
0-2-0-0; Bond, Jack C, 4-3-0-0; Bordy, Phil, 3-4*0; 
Bastic, L. M., Jr., 8-10-1-0; Bowman, E. G., 12-5-0-0; 
Boyles, Jerry F., 6-2-1-0; Brizendine, Vic, 7-11-0-0; 
Brock, John H., 5-11-3-0; Brotzge, Maurice J., 6-15-3-0; 
Brown, Bill, 14-11-1-0; Brown, Herman G., 4-&-1-2; 
Brown, John W., 8-1-0-0; Bullock, Teddy, 1-1-0-0; Burke, 
Daniel F., 3-2-0-0; Burke, David Dean, 5-2-0-0; Burke, 
Harry R., 18-4-0-2; Burkhart, James G., 1-2-0-0; Burton, 
James E., 3-4-0-0; Burton, Jolin, 5-5-1-1; 

Cain, Paul D., 4^-0-0; Caiman, E. C, Jr., 2-2-0-0; 
Canaday, Jacy Glenn, 0-3-0-0; Canady, Ray Blair, 
5-84-1; Canter, John, 5-10-2-1; Calberg, John H., 1-1-0-0; 
Carlson, David A., 6-4-0-1; Carroll, James L., 2-1-3-0; 
Cassell, David F., 24-0-0; Cecil, A. Morris, 7-6-0-0; 
Chinn, Ralph, 5-8-1-0; Cisco, Robert N., 2-3-2-1; Qark, 
Charles Louis, 2-1-1-0; Qark, Maxie B., 0-1-0-0; Qark, 
Owen B., 4-5-1-0; Clemmons, Sam, 3-2-0-1; Clouse, Very! 
R., 0-2-0-0; Clusky, Joe, 3-0-0-0; Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 
3-6-1-0; Collins, C. E., 4-5-0-0; Cook, Richard N., 0-4-0-0; 
Corea, Frank, 2-2-0-0; Cowan, Robert L., 4-4-4-0; Cox, 
Jerry H., 0-3-2-0; Grace, James E., 3-0-0-1; Craft, Al- 
bert B., 6-8-0-0; Craft, Bill, 7-5-4-1; Criniti, Frank, 3-0- 
0-0; Cullen, Charies E., 3-7-1-1; Gulp, WiUard E., 10- 
5-2-0; Curnutte, James R., 1-0-0-0; Current, EUis Ray, 
3-3-2-1; 

Dallman, James W., 3-2-1-0; Davis, Qyde E., 4-1- 
00-; Davis, Curt, 5-14-1-0; Davis, Ralph C, 1-0-0-0; 
Deaton, Dan, 4-0-0-0; DeMont. Robert W., 0-7-0-0; De- 
Muth, Paul E., 64-0-2; Dennedy, Robert, 1-4-0-0; Dent, 
Donald L., 6-5-1-0; Denton, Charles, 4-7-1-0; Denton, 
Wihiam J., 2-3-0-0; Detenber, Gene H., 2-15-6-0; Dial 
Jack W., 1-0-0-0; Dixie, Cornelius, 5-1-0-0; Dizney, Alan, 
2-1-1-2; DoU, Louis E., 1-3-1-0; Donald, Edward W., 
0-2-0-0; Dorsey, James, 5-1-0-0; Douglas, Wayne, 2-0-1-0; 
Downey, Robert F., 3-0-0-0; Drake, Dick 4-8-0-1; Duff, 
Eari, 9-9-0-2; Durkin, Jack, 7-2-0-0; 

EUiott, Carroll L., 5-5-2-1; EUis, Johnny, 3-3-1-0; 
Elovitz, Cari, 136-0-1; Ernst, Edward R., 2-7-0-0; 

Fallon, Robert J., 6-5-04; Fandrich, William W., 
12-2-0-0; Faust, Jack, 246-6-0; Fenimore, Qarke E., 
1-2-1-0; Ferguson, Jesse S., 2-2-0-1; Ferguson, Thomas 
L., 1-0-0-0; Fey, AUen, 7-5-0-0; Fields, Ronald M., 5-8- 
0-0; Fish, Leland G., 54-1-1; Florence, Robert H., 8-2- 
0-0; Flynn, Robert D., 4-11-04; Forbes; John W., 
1-5-0-0; Fortney, Robert Lee, 4-10-3-0; Foster, Berry- 
man E., 6-0-0-0; Foster, Joseph W., 54-1-0; Frakes, 
Chester L., Jr., 0-1-1-0; Fraley, Bill, 2-5-0-1; Frankel, 
Louis S., 1-2-1-0; Franklin, James A., 6-1-0-0; Frazer, 
Tom Roe, 6-1-1-1; Frecka, Jerry, 2-0-0-0; Freese, Oliver 
T., 0-1-0-0; Fruit, William E., 2-5-0-0; Fryrear, Bill 
P., 7-8-1-0; Fucci, Dom, 12-5-0-0; Fugate, E. Hugh, 
3-2-04; Fuller, Wilton H., 7-2-1-0; Funkhouser, Roy A., 
11-6-0-O; 

Galuk, Walter M., 7-7-0-1; Garrett, Richard A., 
4-1-0-0; Gentry, Dale J., 2-3-1-0; Gettler, John F., 
6-6-04; GiUigan, Jack, 34-0-0; Golden, Billy Joe, 
16-9-0-0; Gour, /,^o, 34-0-0; Grace, diaries K., 6-5-24; 
Grace, Hickory, 04-1-1; Graham, Jim, 2-3-1-0; Greene, 
Paul Dutch, 0-1-1-0; Greenoe, Richard H., 1-3-24; 
Grieco, Joe,l-4-0-0; Griffith, Lauren, 1-3-0-0; Griggs, 
John M., 13-6-0-0; Gruneisen, Sam, 14-1-0; 

Hadden, Newell, Jr., 7-7-0-0; Haffey, Stan, 3-3-0-0; 
Hagan, Joe, 2-114-0; Hagerman, Bart, 14-3-1; Hagy, 
Harold J., 3-0-0-0; Hall, Dale, 0-2-0-0; Hall, Henry N., 
3-11-0-2; Hall, John R., 6-5-0-0; Hall, Kennetli, 3-6-0-0; 
Hall, Richard T., 2-5-0-0; Hanes, Edward C, 8-11-1-0; 
Harris, Jerry, 7-3-1-0; Harris, Russell, 7-7-0-0; Hatfield, 
Gene E., 34-0-1;, Hawkins, Will A., 7-3-0-0; Hedge, 
David W., 44-1-1; Heinichen, Carl, 0-1-0-0; Heinze, 
Frank, 24-6-0-0; Heinze, John G., 23-3-1-0; Hellard, 



George D., Jr., 8-24-0; Hendon, L. J., 10-2-0-0; Hicks, 
Lloyd, 0-1-0-0; Hill, Earl F.. 8-5-6-2; Hofstetter, Joe, 
5-2-0-0; Holbrook, William M., 4-3-24; Holeman, D. 
Fletcher, 10-10-1-0; Holland, David W., 5-2-0-0; HoUings- 
worth, Ralph D., 6-3-0-0; Holman, S. T., 8-6-4-1; Huber, 
Carl W., 24-2-3; Hughes, Paul P., 4-2-1-0; Hughes 
Robert E., 8-6-1-2; Huston, Roderick J., 0-3-0-0; Hyn- 
son, Fred R., 64-2-1; 

Idol, BiUy Joe, 8-8-0-0; Idol, Lloyd, Jr., 6-0-0-0; 
Ishmael, Stephen A., 0-2-0-0; 

Jahnigen, Robert E., 2-0-0-0; Jarrell, Frank W., 
5-0-0-0; Jenkins, Beryl M., 1-1-1-1; Jenkins, Kean, 6-5- 
1-0; Jennings, Michael, 6-2-0-0; Johnson, Gordon M., 
2-0-0-0; Johnson, Harry A., Jr., 7-3-0-0; Johnson, Stan 
W., 9-2-1-0; Jones, J. Carl, 10-6-4-1; Jones, Jack W., 
1-0-0-1; Jones, William A., Jr., 10-3-0-0; Junker, Edwin 
G., 0-1-0-0; 

Kallaher, James E., 7-10-0-0; Karr, Don, 3-5-1-2; 
Kathman, Bernie, 1-1-0-0; Kauffman, Victor C, 4-1-1-0; 
Kemper, Rus.s, 4-0-0-0; Kerr, Kenneth, 6-11-0-0; Kessel, 
H. R., 1-0-0-0; Kimble, Frank, 3-2-0-0; Kraft, H. Nellis, 
7-9-0-0; Kraesig, Charies F., 34-3-3; Kratzenberg, 
Ralph, 4-0-0-0; 

Lally, James 2-1-0-0; Lambert, Indn G., 6-10-0-2; 
Lancaster, Morris B., 2-1-0-0; Landers, John F., 5-6-0-0; 
Lange, William E., Jr., 0-2-2-5; Lawson, Leland, 3-3-1-0; 
Leahy, Pat, 4-9-3-0; Ledbetter, Paul M., 1-6-1-0; Leh- 
man, Donald A., 1-5-0-0; Lenahan, Thomas F., 6-13-2-1; 
Liber, James, 1-1-1-0; Lindon, Bob, 6-10-0-3; Lingo, 
Henry E., 6-3-2-0; Locke, WUliam F., 0-4-0-0; Logan, 
Eli, 6-e-O-l; Lotz, Robert W., 7-3-2-0; Lowe, Gene T., 
15-84-1; Lowe, Stan, 12-5-04; Lusby, George, 5-7-2-0; 
Lutz, Charles J., 2-0-0-0; 

McCoUum, Bob, 0-1-0-0; McConaciiie, Bud, 1-8-1-1; 
McCowan, Connell, 2-5-2-0; McDougal, Alf, 6-7-2-0; Mc- 
Fadden, Jimmie, 7-2-1-0; McGehee, Gordon, 114-1-0; 
McGlasson, Gene, 6-5-0-0; McGuire, Jack, 1-2-1-0; Mc- 
Kuiney, Adelle F., 4-6-0-0; McKenzie, Robert L., 0-2-0-0; 
McLane, Albert I., 0-2-1-0; McLemore, Jack T., 3-8-0-1; 
McNamee, Jack, 7-3-1-1; McPeek, Tahnadge, 8-5-0-2; 
McSheffrey, James E., 0-6-0-0; 

Madon, Robert Lee, 4-6-0-0; Magruder. Earl L., 
4-5-1-1; Malone, James F., 0-1-0-0; Marsili, Lee A., 
5-12-0-0; Matthews. Billy D., 9-2-1-0; Mattingly, Charles, 
7-8-0-0; May, Charles E., 0-1-1-0; May, E. B., 22-7-3-0; 
Mayhew, William M., 7-5-1-0; Maynard, Joe E., 8-3-1-0; 
Mayo, Henry L., Jr. 7-5-1-2; Mays, Raymond K., 1-0-0-0; 
Meeks, Jack F., 6-12-0-1; Mehnige, James, Jr. 6-0-0-0; 
Mercke, Frank R., 3-14-0-2; Mercker, George E., 3-7-0-0; 
Metzger, Don 1-2-0-0; Mickey, Elbert W., 1-1-0-0; Miller- 
haus, W. J., 5-2-0-0; Minta, John H., 3-8-0-0; MitcheU, 
Emmett, 4-8-0-0; IVlitchell, Vyron W., 6-2-0-1; Moody, 
William R., 14-2-0; Mooneyhan, James H., 4-6-2-0; 
Mordica, William A., 4-0-1-0; Morgan, Richard, 4-7-1-0; 
Morris, Gene L., 5-0-0-0; Morrissey, Rockne, 4-6-3-0; 
Morse, Richard K., 6-7-0-0; Moss, Howard, 8-4-0-0; 
Mouser, H. D., 0-1-0-0; MueUer, Dick, 0-2-2-0; Mullins, 
B. E., 6-54-0; Muntan, Peter J., 5-6-3-2; Murray, 
Thomas, 6-5-0-0; 

Nassida, Frank R., 1-0-0-0; Neal, Gene, 124-1-0; 
Nevil, Vernon E., 0-2-3-0; Nickell, Carl Duane, 11-2-0-0; 
Noland, Douglas, 8-3-1-0; Nord, Bertrand J., 64-2-0; 
Nord, Ed., 1043-0-0; Nord, Gilbert, 4-9-0-0; Norwood, 
Thomas R., 2-6-1-0; Nutter, Larry E., 8-2-0-0; 

Odil, WUUam Randall, 0-3-1-0; Oldham, Ben, 5-7-2-0; 
Omer, Harold G., 4-6-1-0; O'Nan, Norman, 11-1-0-0; 
O'Neal, Bud, 2-8-2-6; Orem, Dale Linton, 0-1-0-0; Os- 
borne, Ted G., 6-64-1; Overby, H. E., 8-6-2-0; Owens, 
Charies C, Jr., 24-0-0; Owens, R. L., Jr. 0-3-1-0; 

Pace, Donald, 2-0-1-0; Parker; Bob L., 1-1-1-0; Par- 
ker, Francis V., 2-2-0-0; Parsley, Clyde E., 5-3-0-0: 
Pate Lloyd W., 13-2-1-0; Peecher, W. Lloyd 1-1-0-0 
,Peeno, Harry, 5-3-5-1; Pegaijsch, William E. 5-5-0-0 
Perry, Tom, 2-0-1-0; Pinson, Eugene, 4-0-1-0; Plate, 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



Arthur C. O-l-O-O; Porco, Kenneth J., 0-2-0-0; Powell, 
Logan. 6-10-1-0; Powers, Tom, 1-2-1-0; Prather, Wilber 
E., 3-9-1-2; 

Rapp, William, 0-1-0-0; Raque, Ronald, 0-4-0-0; 
Rawls, L. Townes, 0-1-0-0; Ray, Bob, 7-6-0-0; Ray, 
Shirley G., 6-1-1-0; Reaves, F. B., 0-1-0-0; Reddington, 
Jim, 4-9-5-0; Reece, Fred, 13-5-0-1; Reece, Jerry T., 
3-1-0-0; Reed, Gordon, 10-3-1-0; Renfro, John E., 6-3-0-3; 
Richardson, Dennie C.,Jr., 0-1-1-0; Riggins, Jason M., 
2-2-0-0; Riggs, William T., 54-1-1; Ring, BiU, 5-7-0-1; 
Robinson, Don L., 3-0-0-0; Rodgers, Tom H., 12-5-2-1; 
Roettger, W. H., 6-3-2-0; Roof, Jerry C, 0-1-0-0; Ross, 
Roy G., 2-0-0-0; Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 1-13-3-0; RusseU, 
Gary Evan, 7-2-0-0; RusseU, Joe, 13-3-0-1; Russell, 
Kenneth E., 1-0-0-0; Russman, Godfrey F., 4-10-1-0; 

Sacra, Gresham, 7-2-1-0; Sanders, Mel, 11-3-0-0; 
Sapp, Edward, 2-7-3-1; Sawyer, Thomas G., 2-0-0-0; 
Schad, Jim. ,1-2-1-0; Scharfenberger, Irv, 0-3-0-0; Schier- 
ing. Jack H., 0-3-1-0; Sohlioh, Paul E., 5-8-3-0; Sdimitt, 
K. F., 8-4-2-1; Schmitt, Paul E., 3-5-2-0; Sohrecker, 
Dennis R., 4-5-1-0; Schuble, Charles E., 3-5-1-1; Schwet- 
schenau, Paul, 1-5-0-1; Sconce, John, 0-1-0-0; Scott, W. 
L., 5-6-0-1; Seale, Wilham E., 8-4-1-3; Selhnan, John 
B. 0-1-0-0; Selvy, Curt, 11-6-1-1; Shanks, Thomas E., 
5-4-2-0; Shaw, John H., 8-5-0-0; Shirley, Michael D., 
Jr., 2-0-0-0; Showalter, John, 5-6-3-0; Sloan, Wally, 7-9- 
3-1; Smith, Edgar J., 1-16-2-1; Snook, Patrick, 6-4-0-0; 
Snyder, Gus, 6-1-0-0; South, Stanley Parks, 0-0-1-0; 
Spencer, H. Edward, 3-0-0-0; Staley, E. G., 5-6-2-0; 
Staples, Jerry, 0-1-0-0; Staten, Joe, 8-5-2-0; Stephens, 
Herbert D., 1-0-0-0; Stephenson, Harry 5-4-0-0; Stevens, 
William D., 7-10-1-0; Strain, Richard P., 6-6-1-0; Strong, 
Amett, 10-6-1-1; Sucietto, Richard, 14-0-1; Sullivan, A. 
G., 4-3-2-2; Sullivan, Don Chris, 8-7-0-1; Swarts, Joseph, 
1-2-0-0; Swinford, John, 3-3-0-1; 

Tackett, Jay, 3-6-0-1; Talbot, William G., 2-3-1-0; 
Taylor, Dennis H., 9-1-0-0; Taylor, Ronald Louis, 0-3-1-0; 
Thomas, Charles, 1-2-0-0; Thomas Frank M., 2-1-0-0; 
Thomas, Raymond E., 114-0-3; Thompson, Jack, 1-9-0-0; 
Thompson, Jack F., Jr., 7-16-5-0; Thompson, Ralph, 
3-1-0-0; Thompson, Tom, 2-5-0-0; Thnmering, George E., 
5-8-1-0; Trautwein, Jim, 2-6-0-0; Treas, Joe W., 2-4-1-0; 
Trimer, Norman E., 0-7-2-2; Trunzo, Nicholas P., 3-5- 
0-0; Tussey George, Jr., 5-1-2-1; 

VanHoose, Jack D., 24-3-0; VanWrk, Alvia S., 
24-0-0; Van Meter, David G., 2-14-0-1; VanZant, Jim, 
1-0-0-0; Varner, Gene, 2-0-0-0; Vaughan, Dick, 3-1-1-0; 
Vennari, Paul, 3-0-0-0; Vennell, Robert H., 4-0-0-0; 
Vinciguerra, Philip, 6-()-0-0; 

Wagner, Jim, 8-6-0-0; Waide, Harry D., 1-3-1-1; 
Walker, Julian R., 4-6-0-1; Walker, Paul R., 6-11-1-0; 
Waller, Bobbie E., 8-9-1-0; Wanchic, Nick, 15-8-^0; 
Warfield, James A., 4-5-1-2; Warren, Kenneth A., 
3-8-2-0; Washaleski, Thomas, 3-1-1-0; Washer, Stanley, 
4-6-0-1; Watts, Shirley, 15-6-1-0; Weaver, Qyde Ivan, 
1-1-0-0; Webb, Ralph Dudley, 3-0-0-1; Welch, Bill. 
2-3-0-0; Welch, J. D., 4-6-1-0; Welch, Robert J., Jr., 
1-0-0-0; Werkowitz, Jack, 4-3-1-0; White, James, 6-7-1-0; 
Wigginton, A. M., Sr., 0-1-0-0; Willey, Harold L., 1-0-0-0; 
WiUiams, Bert O., 0-1-0-0; WilUams, Gene, 8-5-0-0; WU- 
liams, James H., 3-2-0-0; Willis, Donald A., 3-2-1-0; WU- 
son, Louis O., 5-8-0-0; Wise; BiUy V., 17-6-0-1; Wise, 
Jack, 15-9-0-1; Womack, William H., 5-1-1-1; Wray, 
Robert, 104-0-1; Wyatt, William J., 14-2-0; 

Yanity, Joseph B., Jr., 1-1-0-0; 

Zaranka, Benny J., 9-8-0-0; Zehner, Albert, 3-4-0-1; 
Zimmer, Tom, 5-6-0-0; Zlamal, Raymond K., 0-2-0-1. 

The Flying Dutchman 

(Continued from Page Four) 
without making a try provided the signal 
ending the period has not sounded. Example: 
A-1 may bounce the ball off the floor into 
the basket and score, or off a player, pro- 



vided time did not run out while the ball was 
in the air. 

From St. Augustine Paris'h in Louisville, 
Reverend Arthur J. Hartman writes he is 
trying to interest the right people in build- 
ing Community Recreation Buildings. More 
power to you, Reverend Hartman. These are 
needed all over Kentucky. 

Here's a closing thought: Don't wear 
your wishbone where your backbone ought 
to be. 

HOSPITALITY COMMITTEE 

The following events and functions of 
the Hospitality Committee in connection 
with the State High School Basketball 
Tournament will be of interest to tourna- 
ment visitors: 

DANCES will be held in the Convention 
Center (formerly the Armory at 6th and 
Walnut Street) on Thursday and Friday 
nights, March 17 and March 18 from 10:30 
P.M. to 1:00 A.M. The admission price is 
$1.00 per couple or individual. 

GOLF courses of the city and county 
will be available for free usage to State 
Tournament visitors. 

THE RECBJ^ATION CENTER (West 
Wing of the Fairgrounds) will be open to all 
students for free basketball and tennis daily. 

INFORMATION CENTERS — Desks 
will be set up and manned at both the Ken- 
tucky Hotel and Freedom Hall at the 
Fairgrounds. Students may register for all 
the hosoitality events at either the Ken- 
tucky Hotel or Freedom Hall Information 
Centers, but coaches may only register at 
Freedom Hall Information Center. They 
must show their identification cards and 
have the names checked off the list of 
coaches which will be provided by the 
K.H.S.A.A. 

'hospitality room at Freedom Hall 
for basketball coaches, assistant basketball 
coaches, athleltic directors and school 
principals will be opened daily, 30- 
minutes before game time. All who will be 
eligible to enioy the Hosmtalitv Room 
should come prepared with their identifica- 
tion cards from the various associations, etc., 
as two uniformed attendants will be on duty 
at the door to expedite admittance to the 
room. 

PRACTICE ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 
teams — Princinals of coaches desiring 
practice accommodations may phone or write 
to Louisville Male Hip-h School and make ar- 
rangements with Prin. Fo'^ter J. Sanders, 
for iisf^ of various Louisville e^vmnflsiums. 

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION BADCES 
— All students, in order to particinate in the 
entertainment features of the Hospitality 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



Page Nine 



Program and receive special prices, must 
have identification badges which may be 
picked up when they register at the Infor- 
mation Desks in the Kentucky Hotel lobby 
or at Freedom Hall. 

TRANSPORTATION — Cabs displaying 
signs will charge a flat rate to the Fair- 
grounds from the hotel district as they did 
at the previous Tournament. Buses will be 
identified with signs and will give special at- 
tention to service from downtown to the 
Fairgrounds at regular rates. 

PARKING OF SCHOOL BUSES at the 
Fairgrounds has been handled at the rate of 
25c per bus. It has been requested by the 
police that, in order to handle buses expedi- 
tiously and to place them all in a special 
parking area, they use the same Gate No. 2, 
off Crittenden Drivce, as will be used by 
Tournament Officials. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Saturday afternoon, January 29, 1966. The 
meeting was called to order by President Foster J. 
Sanders at 2:00, with Board members P/Iorton Combs, 
Don Davis, Sherman Gish, Preston Hollsmd, Don R. 
Rawlings, and Oran C. Teater; Commissioner Theo, A. 
Sanford and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. The invocation was given by President 
Sanders. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the reading of the minutes of the December IStih 
meeting be waived, since members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Sherman Gish, 
that the following regulations concerning the fees for 
regional basketball tournament officials be adopted: 
The official shall receive a fee of $25.00 per game and 
a transportation allowance of 8 cents per mile for all 
necessary travel. In the event that it is necessary for 
the official to remain overnight at the tournament site, 
he shall be paid an additional $10.00 per day for lodg- 
ing and meals. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There was a general discussion of possible new 
proposals to be submitted by the Board of Control to 
the forthcoming 1966 Delegate Assembly of the Associa- 
ation. Action on the proposals was deferred to a later 
meeting. 

The Commissioner reported that there had been 
two ties in the district tournament balloting, and that 
he had broken these ties on the basis of what he con- 
sidered the merits of the cases, following a directive 
from President Sanders. Oran C. Teater moved, sec- 
onded by Preston Holland, that the action of the 
President and the Commissioner be approved, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to break district bas- 
ketball tournament ties in future years on the basis 
of the merits of the cases until tiiis plan is changed by 
the Board of Control. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner reported that bids for telecast- 
ing the final game of the State Basketball Tournament 
would be opened on February 1. 

The Commissioner reported that he had received 
several inquiries in recent months concerning whether 
or not the use of registered officials in second team 



athletic contests is required under present K.H.S.A.A. 
regulations. He stated that, under the By-Laws head- 
ing in Association rules, the following appears: "Gov- 
erning AU Contests Between Teams Representing 
Member Schools." He further stated that it was his 
belief that a strict interpretation of this rule should 
not apply to teams below the junior varsity or second 
tegjn level, but that it was his intention to interpret the 
rule concerning the use of registered officials as apply- 
ing to first and second team athletic contests, beginning 
in the school year 1966-67. He asked members of the 
Board whether or not they agreed with this proposed 
interpretation, and there was unanimous agreement 
on this interpretation as a matter of Association policy. 

The Commissioner reported that two member 
schools of the Association had been suspended during 
the current school year for short periods of time be- 
cause it was his opinion that school representatives had 
violated the provisions of By-Law 17. Each coach had 
removed his team from the basketball floor before 
the end of the game. The Temple Hill High School 
;had been suspended for a period of two weeks, begin- 
ning December 6, 1965; and the Sayre High School had 
been suspended for the same period of time, beginning 
January 24, 1966. 

Assistant Commissioner Mansfield reported that 
plans were being completed for the registration of 
basebodl umpires during the forthcoming season, and 
that Athletic Director Harry Stephenson of Transyl- 
vania College will conduct a School for Baseball Offi- 
cials at the K.H.S.A.A. office on February 5, 1966. 
Those officialj invited to attend the school will conduct 
baseball clinics in their areas, and assist in the regis- 
tration of umpires. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Oran C. 
Teater, that the Track regulations appearing in the 
September issue of the ATHLETE be amended as 
follows in the events for girls: Substitute 880 yd. Run 
for 660 yd. Run, omit 75 yd D-n;=h -^M 100 yd. Hurdles. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Don R. Rawl- 
ings, that ail bills of the Association for the period 
beginning December 1, 1965, and ending December 31, 
1965, be allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 

Letter from the Commissioner 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
en to your winner and runner-up. 

12. Send Secretary Ohr of the Kentucky 
Coaches Association the list of district 
coaches to be enrolled in his organization 
and remittance for these, and send the Com- 
missioner the various reports mentioned 
above as soon as possible. 

13. Tournament Rule VI-A-3 provides 
that the district representative to the annual 
meeting may be allowed for expenses an 
amount not to exceed $50.00. Since this is a 
maximum and not necessarily a fixed 
amount, the delegate should be asked to 
submit an estimate of the cost of his lodg- 
ing, transportation, and meals because of 
his representing the district at the annual 
meeting. 

Sincerely yoiu"s, 
Ted Sanford 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



Basketball Questions 

(Continued from Page One) 
free throw. Team B is given a free throw for the foul 
by A3. Play is resumed by a center jump following £ill 
the free tlu-ow attempts. 

29. Play: Before there has been any score, Al and 
A2 dribble or pass the ball in the mid-court area, while 
team B maintains a deep zone defense. 

vRuling: Because the score is tied, team B is 
responsible for action. If team A does not voluntarily 
provide action by passing or dribbling into the scoring 
area, the official should warn and point to team B after 
about thirty seconds. After this warning, at least two 
players of team B must advance to aggressively force 
action If ball and at least two players of A remain in 
the mid-court area. If the bcdl is advanced out of the 
mid-court area into the scoring area, and is then 
returned to the mid-court, B has another five seconds 
ir< which to force action. Failure by B to act is a 
technical foul. 

30. Play: While behind in the score, A continues to 
hold, dribble or pass the ball in the mid-court area, 
with no opposition from B. 

Ruling: After about 30 seconds, the first part of 
which the official will estimate and the last 5 seconds 
of which he may count while using a chopping hand 
motion, the responsible team (A) should be warned 
without stopping the clock. Thereafter, for the remain- 
der of the period, and whUe A is responsible, team A 
has appro.ximately 5 seconds in which to advance 
the ball beyond the mid-court area, unless in the 
meantime, one or more players of team B advance to 
provide action in the mid-court. If the ball is advanced 
clearly beyond the mid-court and returned, a new 5- 
second count is started. 

31. Play: Team B is behind in the score and is on 
defense. Team A has two nlayers in the mid-con rt 
area and is holding the ball. Two team B players move 
into the mid-court area about ten feet away from the 
A players. They make little or no effort to force tLc 
play. 

Ruling: This does not constitute an active attempt 
to secure the ball. The defense must establish a posi- 
tion within six feet of the player with the ball. Failure 
to become at least this aggressive will draw an offi- 
cial's warning after thirty seconds or a technical foul 
after five seconds, once a warning has been given 
during the period to that team and it is responsible for 
action. 

32. Play: A6 reports to the scorer during the final 
thirty seconds of the first hait. The half expires with- 
out a substitution opportunity. The coach of team A 
advises the substitute to start the second hall. Must 
the player again report to the scorer? 

Ruling: Yes. The substitute is required to report 
to the scorer again before he enters the game to be- 
come a player. The substitution was not completed 
because tlie substitute was not signalled by the official 
to come onto the court. 

33. Play: Substitute A6 has reported to the scorer 
and is ready to enter as the official: (a) is hsinding 
ball to the free thrower; or (b) is starting to toss the 
ball for a jump; or (c) has reached count of 4 on a 
throw-in. 

Ruling: A change of status is about to occur in (a), 
(b), and (c). The scorer should not signal nor should 
the official beckon the substitute onto the court. 

34. Play: Al, in the mid-court area is being legally 
guarded by Bl. Al earnestly attempts to advance the 
ball by dribbling. However, more than 5 seconds is 
consumed. 

Ruling: The official wUl not start a held ball 5- 
second count while the dribbler is making a bona fide 
attempt to advance the ball out of the mid-court area. 



35. Play: Al scores a field goal. Bl takes ball out 
of bounds at end of court for the throw-in. He passes 
ball parallel to the end line to B2 who also is out of 
bounds at end of court. After 3 seconds have expired, 
B2 requests time-out. 

Ruling: Official should grant the request. When 
bcdl is next put in play, team B wiU have the throw-in 
privileges which prevailed before the charged time-out. 

36. Play. Is 01 a legal number? 

Ruling: It is not illegal. However, it falls in the 
same category as 00 or three-digit numbers and it is 
not recommended. 

37. Play: Team A, leading in the score, advances 
the ball beyond its mid-court. Al holds the ball. No 
B player takes legal guarding position against him. Al 
holds the ball for an extended period in the neighbor- 
hood of two minutes. 

Ruling: There is no held ball. B. can secure a held 
ball in this sistuation only by placing one of its team 
members in legal guarding position against Al, that is, 
the player with the ball. 

38. Play: Prior to tossing the ball for a jump, the 
official confirms there are 2 seconds of time left in 
the period. After a legal tap and after thee ball has 
touched the floor, the backboard, or a player, it goes 
out of bounds. The official then discovers that the timer 
neglected to start the game clock. 

Ruling: The referee is justified in declaring the 
period over if, in his opinion, he is positive that two 
or more seconds were consumed after the game clock 
should have been started. 

39. Play: While seated on the bench and without 
using words or actions to incite, the coach instructs 
his team while the clock is running. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. A coach may 
instruct his team while sitting on the bench, as long 
as he does not tend to incite. 

40. Play: Can a foul which is penalized with a 
bona.' attempt be one element of a false double foul? 

Ruling: Yes, and very frequently it is. 

41. Play: A throw-in by Al is legally batted by Bl 
so that -'. strikes thrower-in Al while Al is out of 
bounds. 

Ruling: learn B is awarded the ball out of bounds 
for a uuow-in. 

42. Play: Team A is two minutes late for the start 
of the second half. 

Ruling: Technical foul. One free throw is awarded 
team B and, following the free throw attempt, team B 
is given the ball for a throw-in from out of bounds at 
at mid-court on either side. 

43. Play: Al starts his movement for a field goal 
attempt. Al pushes Bl as Bl holds Al during the try. 
The ball goes in A's basket. 

Ruling: Double foul. The goal does not count. Play 
is resumed with a jump at center. 

44. Play: Near expiration of time for the second 
quarter, Al is fouled after he has started his throwing 
motion, which is continued with the ball going in the 
basket but time expires before the ball leaves his 
hand. 

Ruling: Goal does not count. One free throw is 
awarded. Foul is penalized before period ends. 

45. Play: A6 is entitled and ready to enter when a 
field goal is scored. Should the scorer sound the horn 
or the official stop the clock? 

RuHng: No. The clock should not be stopped for 
the express purpose of permitting the substitution. 
Time-out may be requested by players on the court for 
this purpose. If time-out is called, or the clock is 
stopped by the official for another reason during the 
dead ball, substitutes may enter. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



Page Eleven 



TRACK ASSIGNMENTS 

Track regulations adopted by the Board of Control 
provide that the state shall be divided into classes 
and regions by the Commissioner who will assign the 
schools to the regional sites. The 1966 assignments are 
as follows: 

TRACK — GIRLS 

Paducah Region — Ballard, Calloway, Lone Oak. Lyon 
County, Madisonville, Murray, North Marshall, Paducah, St. 
Mary. 

Bowling Green Region — Adair, Austin-Tracy, Central City, 
Cub Run, Franklin Simpson. Greenville, Hiseville, Park City, 
Russellville. Temple Hill, TompkinsviUe, Warren County. 

Fort Knox Region — Caneyville, Fort Knox, Greensburg, 
Henderson, Henderson County, LaRue County, Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic, Taylor County. 

West Jefferson Region — Butler, Carroll County, Eminence, 
Holy Rosary. Loretto, Oldham County, Thomas Jeefferson, 
Valley, Western. 

East Jefferson Region — Angela Merici. Durrett, Eastern, 
Fern Creek, Lady of Mercy, Sacred Heart, Seneca, Shelbyyille, 
Ursuline. 

Lexington Region — Anderson, Boyle County, Bryan feta- 
tion, Danville, Franklin County, Harrison County. Harrods- 
burg, Lexington Catholic, Paris. Woodford County. 

Richmond Region— Bush. Evarts, London. McCreary County, 
Montgomery County, Monticello, Mt. Sterling, Whitley County. 

Morehead Region — Boyd County. Breckinridge Training, 
Fairview, Flat Gap, Fleming County, Louisa, Paintsville, Paul 
G. Blazer, Raceland, Russell. 

TRACK - CLASS A BOYS 

Paducah Region — Ballard Memorial, Calhoun, Dawson 
Springs, Earlington, Ft. Campbell, Fulton, Hickman County, 
Lyon County, Murray, Murray College, Providence, Reidland, 
St. Mary (Paducah). Trigg County. 

Bowling Green Region — Auburn. Austin Tracy, Bnstow, 
Central City, College, Cub Run, Cumberland County, Edmon- 
son County, Gamaliel, Greenville, Hiseville, Hughes - Kirk, 
Metcalfe County, North Warren, Park City, Russellville, 
Temple Hill. , .„ 

Fort Knox Region — Bardstown, Bloomfield, Campbellsville, 
Caneyville, Caverna, Clarkson. Grayson Catholic. Hancock 
County, Leitchfield, Lebanon. Munfordville, St. Mary's (Whites- 
ville), Springfield, West Hardin. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Dayton, Eminence, 
Falmouth, Gallatin, Ludlow, Maysville, Trimble County, Wil- 
liamstown. 

Lexington Region — Anderson, Frankfort, Georgetown. 
Good Shepherd. Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Millersburg 
Military Institute, Mt. Sterling, Nicholas County. Paris, Sayre, 
Shelbyville. 

Richmond Region — Berea. Burgin, Ferguson. Foundation, 
Jackson, Madison, Monticello, Mt. Vernon, Shopville. Stanford. 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville. Buckhorn, Bush, Flem- 
ing-Neon, Harlan, Jenkins. Lily, London, Lone Jack, Loyall, 
Pineville, Riverside Christian, Wallins, Williamsburg. 

Morehead Region — Bath County, Blaine, Breckinridge 
Training, Catlettsburg, Fairview, Feds Creek, Flat Gap, Johns 
Creek, Martin, Menifee County, Morgan County, Mullins, Oil 
Springs, Paintsville, Pikeville, Prichard, Raceland. 

TRACK — CLASS AA BOYS 

Paducah Region — Attucks. Caldwell County, Calloway 
County, Christian County, Crittenden County, Hopkinsville, 
Lone Oak, Mayfield, North Marshall. Paducah. 

Henderson County Region — Daviess Coun i, Henderson, 
Henderson County, Madisonville. Ohio County. Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic, Union County, Webster County. 

Bowling Green Region — Adair County. Bowling Green, 
Butler County, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow Greensburg, La- 
Rue, Taylor County, Todd County, TompkinsviUe, Warren 
County, Wayne County. 

Fort Knox Region — Breckinridge County, East Hardin, 
Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Henry County, Kentucky Military 
Institute, Meade County, North Hardin, Old Kentucky Home, 
Oldham County, St. Joseph. Shelby County. Shepherdsville. 

Bellevue Region — Boone County, Campbell County, Carroll 
County, Covington Catholic, Dixie Heights. Grant County, 
Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Newport, Newport Catholic, Pend- 
leton County, Simon-Kenton. 

Lexington Region — Bourbon County. Boyle County, Bryan 
Station, Clark County, Danville, Dunbar, Franklin County, 
Garrard County. Harrison County, Henry Clay, Jessamine 
County, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, Scott County, Tales 
Creek, Woodford County. 

Richmond Region — Clay County, Corbin, Cumberland, 
Evarts, Hall, Hazard. Hazel Green, Knox Central, McCreary 
County, Madison Central, M. C. Napier, Middlesboro, Pulaski 
■. Qunty, Somerset, Whitesburg, Whitley County. 

Morehead Region — Belfry, Boyd County. Elkhorn City, 
Fleming County, Louisa, McKell, Mason County, Paul G. 
Blazer, Prestonsburg, Kussell, Virgie, Wurtland. 



TRACK — CLASS AAA BOYS 

Butler Region — Butler, Central, Flaget, Male, Manual, 
Shawnee. 

Atherton Region — Atherton, DeSales. Durrett, St. Xavier, 
Southern. Thomas Jefferson. 

Valley Region — Bishop David, Fairdale, Iroquois, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Valley, Western. 

Eastern Region — Eastern, Fern Creek, Seneca, Trinity, 
Waggener, Westport. 

Certified and Approved Officials 

Three additional officials have qualified 
for the Certified rating since the list of 
these higher rated officials appeared in the 
January issue of the ATHLETE. They are: 
Paul E. Boyles, Ralph M. Casteel, Lawrence 
Newsom. The name of Richard Sucietto 
should be added to the list of Approved 
basketball officials. 

A New Sport For Kentucky 

By Dr. O. H. Gunkler 

Dir. of Phys. Ed. and Ath. Berea College 

Throughout the high schools of America 
the game of soccer is rapidly increasing 
in popularity. School people in Kentucky in- 
terested in encouraging a broad participa- 
tion in athletics might well consider soccer 
in their program. Both schools that field 
football teams in the fall, and schools that 
do not play football, could furnish activity 
that would serve a group of boys who other- 
wise would have no chance to play in a fall 
program of interscholastic athletics. 

Football appeals to the large, robust 
athlete who en.joy.'? a body contact sport. The 
small or medium-sized boy is frequently at 
a disadvantage in football. In soccer the size 
of the man is relativelv unimportant, for 
premium is placed on ability, speed, coordi- 
nation, mastery of skills and team play. 
Some of the world's outstanding soccer 
players are medium or small-sized men. 

Soccer is an inexpensive sport. Expen- 
sive pads and uniforms are not needed. The 
game can be played with ordinary gymna- 
sium or basketball shoes, although as the 
player developes he would prefer playing in 
soccer shoes. A long sleeved or quarter 
sleeved jersey, long socks and elastic waist 
trunks complete the uniform. Equipment no 
more expensive than the regular physical 
education uniforms could be used. The game 
could be played as an extramural contest 
until interest and skill is developed to the 
point when soccer could be included in the 
school's interscholastic program. 

There is some leeway in the size of the 
field, although in general a field the size of 
a football field would be satisfactory. 

The same field could be used for both 
games. This is a common practice. The mark- 
ings for one game would not interfere with 
the other. Dual purpose goal posts can be 
developed. 

One of the criticisms directed against 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1966 



ANNOUNCING FOR 1966-1967 

The Special Football Plan Designed For Kentucky 
High School Football Coaches Association Will Be 
Offered In Connection With An Excellent Student 
Accident Coverage For Your Schools. 

Your Inquiries Will Be Answered Promptly. 



7<4e KifUfdest GomfMH4^ 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121 LAFAYEnE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY. Mgr. 

Life Department 
LEXINGTON. KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 255-0837 



modem interscholastic athletics is that so 
few boys participate in proportion to the 
number enrolled in school. If soccer were in- 
troduced and the boys given a chance to de- 
velop skill in this area a new sport with a 
minimum of expense could be introduced in 
the athletic program. 

Soccer is always included and higihly 
regarded in the Olympic Games. The United 
States has yet to gain any recognition in 
this sport, so important to the rest of the 
world. As soccer continues to grow and de- 
velop in this country the day may not be too 
far away when America can field a team 
which would bring honor to her in yet an- 
other sport. Soccer is probably more univer- 
sally played than any other team sport in 
the world. Our foreign students at Berea 
College have helped to promote this game. 
They have developed skills from early child- 
hood and their footwork is spectacular. In 
a relatively short time, however, our Ameri- 
can bovs develop rapidly enough to play a 
creditable game of soccer. The American 
love of competition stands them in good 
stead. 

The following publications would be 
helpful : 
The Official Collegiate-Scholastic Soccer 



Guide, National Collegiate Athletic Bureau, 

Box 757, Grand Central Station, New York 

17, N.Y. 

Frank F. DiClemente, Soccer Illustrated, The 

Ronald Press, 15 East 26th Street, New 

York City, 204 pages, 113 illustrations. 

$4.00. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

If one telephone number is sriven for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Boyles, Paul E., 809 Belfonte Rd., Flatwoods, 836-5497, 324- 

1174, ext. 302 
Casteel. Ralph M., Casteel Hardware Company, East Berns- 

tadt, VI 3-2732. VI 3-2730 
Meeks. Jack F., 5th Street Road, Corbin 
Newson, Lawrence, 818 Fair Franz Drive, Ashland, 325-7581, 

325-1625 
Perkins, William E., 481 Erie Road, Lexington 

Dutchman's New Job 

The city and county parks systems and 
recreation programs of Louisville and Jeffer- 
son County are scheduled to be merged by 
July 1. Charlie Vettiner, county parks and 
recreation superintendent, will become head 
of the merged operation which may be the 
largest combined program in the nation. Mr. 
Vettiner is the ATHLETE'S Flying Dutch- 
man and the long-time basketball clinic 
director for the K.H.S.A.A. 



SUTCLIFFE'S SALUTES 

the many individuals whose tireless eiiorts make our 

Kentucky tournament the success that it is the 

hundreds of behind-the-scenes specialists who know 
their jobs and do them so well 

COACHES 



Try Sutcliffe's — supplying team 
and school athletic supplies for 
more than 60 years. 



Try Sutcliffe's fast shipping service 
from our huge Louisville warehouse 
stocks. 



Use Sutcliffe's field force of speci- 
alty school representatives whose 
business it is to help coaches and 
principals with their athletic equip- 
ment budget. 



Use Sutcliffe's for anything in 
athletic supplies from handballs to 
electric scoreboards. 



Sutcliffe's solicits your interest, 
your inquiries, and your orders. 




UTCLIFFE CO. 



INCORPORATED 



BOX 959 LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 




K.H.S.A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following: 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 

No. ARX Last Bilt ball made by Spalding. 

Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament 

in Louisville. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams. All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and rect- 
angular glass backboards complete with ffoals and nets in stock for at once 
delilvery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play in our warehouse 
ready for immediate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium 
before tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, ED HENDLEY or C.A. BYRN, JR. are al- 
ways ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNTS 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
PHONE 451-0576 LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Wf ShipThp DaV Vou Buy 





r 





HighSc/ioo/Athlete 



THE KENTUCKY SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 
1966 CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING TEAM 




(Left ro Right) Front Row: Earl Jones, Jimmy Whitehouse, Dan Dickerson, Larry Crowe, 
Virgil Ritchie, Joe Gary Flint, Edward iMyers, Joe Triplette. Second Row: Ass't Coach Will 
D. Evans, Richard Lewis, Grady Curlin, Larry Cook, James Earl Hardin, Earl Wayne 
Moore, Larry Kerr, Coach W. Edward Murray, Jr. 



Official Organ of (lie 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

March, 1986 



Modern Ides of March 



Tilt ayni lij^hts yleam iikt a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Fridaj night : 

For basketball biJckons '•( ome!" 



A r^harp-shooting mite is king tonight 
The Madness of March is running. 

The winged feet fly. the ball sails high 
And field goal hunters are gunning. 



Tin toliu - clasl. u ->ih- un llci^li 
And race od a .•shimmering fiooi 

R('l>tes^i(ins die. and paiti-sans \\i' 
III a s>nal a( rlaimin!.' roai 



Oil Championship Trail toward a hoi} grail 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



SiiKt tiiiK began Uk iii.--liiu t.^ ot man 
Pro\e cave ;ind current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Arc relatixp iindei the skin 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



AAiili «ai uti\e- lenM. tbt final defense 
Iv the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And libert^ linger.'- still 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 



Goals of Athletics 

By Rhea H. Williams 
Editor's Note: The article below appeared in a 
recent issue of the Texas Interscholastic Leaguer. Dr. 
Williams, who writes a "Postscripts on Athletics" 
column, is State Athletic Director of the Texas Uni- 
versity Interscholastic League. 

Goals of professional athletics are not 
the same as those of amateur athletics. Pub- 
licity men of the professionals sell their 
product so strongly that they are causing 
confusion of goals and philosophy in ama- 
teur educational athletics. 

There are three basic differences be- 
tween the professional and the educational 
goals of athletic competition. First, the pro- 
fessional's attitude toward game officials is 
based on selling tickets. If protests arouse 
fan interests, then they are condoned. 

The educational attitude is based on 
sportsmanship. Once officials are accepted 
by both teams, their decisions are to be 
respected, regardless of fan reaction. 

Second, the professional is concerned 
with creating a spectacle. The goal is to 
excite fans to make them want to see more. 
Benefit to Players 

The amateur philosophy aims at the 
good accruing to the players. The fan is ap- 
preciated, but the whole program is aimed 
at creating a climate of optimum educational 
benefit to players and to fans. 

Third, the profession! program is strict- 
ly commercial. Its goals are all designed to 
make more money. Player protection is of 
secondary interest. 

The amateur program places ultimate 
value on player protection and benefits. 
Respect for Officials 

The participant in educational athletics 
is trained to play well and hard and to ac- 
cept rulings with good siDirit. He is tausrht to 
play to win, but to gain from the contest, 
win, lose or draw. 

Rulings of game officials in Drofessional 
event are often greeted with wild emotional 
expressions of dismav or feiomed disbelief. 
There is seldom a professional football, bas- 
ketball, or baseball game where some unde- 
sirable words are not srvoken, where fisti- 
cuffs don't break out, where some plavers 
are not ejected for unsportsmanlike conduct. 



Emotions Sell Tickets 

The professionals strive to make the 
game exciting to attract more paying custo- 
mers. Altercations between players, coaches 
and officials seem to promote ticket sales. 

There is no place in educational athletics 
for such conduct. The purpose of educational 
athletics is to train athletes, fans and 
coaches to control their tempers, to accept 
decisions of game officials without protests, 
to be good citizens and to demonstrate good 
sportsmanship. 

The loss of these goals would make it 
impossible to justify scholastic athletics as 
educational endeavors. 

Administrators and coaches must never 
lose sig'ht of the fact that games should be 
played for the student, the school and the 
community in such a way as to develop de- 
sirable, ethical character traits. 

The sale of tickets is a primary require- 
ment of professional athletics. The high 
school athletic program is basically educa- 
tional and should never be promoted or de- 
veloped as a commercial enterprise. The 
focus must be on the welfare of the student, 
the student body and the educational pro- 
gram of the school. 

Athletics ai'e only a part of the school 
program. True, they are an integral part, 
but they should never receive more than due 
emphasis in the curriculum. 

The band, pep squad and other related 
activities of the athletic program are bona 
fide educational activities, if properly direct- 
ed. Difficulties arise when student organiza- 
tions and athletes are u«ed to the detriment 
of the entire student body and the school 
program. This tendencv must be avoided 
in high schools. There is no justifi- 
cation for imitating professional athletics by 
prodncinie spectacular emotional events. 

Profe«sional teams are fast selling their 
very "soul" to television and other media for 
more monev. The mass media have insisted 
and directed that schedules and game breaks 
be rearranged for their convenience: that 
exorbitant s^'lai'ies be paid to attract plavers 
to ioin specific league teams in order to o-aui 
greater viewer prestiee, and are makine: 
other demands in order to obtain the best 
television contracts. 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 8 



M.\RCH. 196f 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second clBiS postage paid at Lexingion Kentucky. 

Editor THKO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD 01 CON'lROl 

President Foster J. Sanderi (1962 66 Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1 9fi.i.691. Murray 

Directors — Morton Combi (1964-68 i. Can Creek; Don Davi 
(1963-67). .independence; Ralph C. Dorsej (1962-66), Horsi 
Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69). Danville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68). Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

jt*iom the Commissioned s Dfflce 



REPORTS NOW DIE 

1. 1965-66 Ba.sketball Participation List 

2. School'.s Repoi't on Basketball Official,^ 

3. Official's Report on Schools 
(Ba.sketball) 



Spring Meets 



Tentative dates have been set for the 
various spring: meets and tournaments in 
rifle marksmanship, baseball, track, golf and 
tennis. Thev are as follows : 

April 30. State Rifle Championship 
Lexington 

May 9-11, district baseball tournaments 
(sites given below) 

Ma.v 13-14, regional track meets foi 
boys and girls (sites given in February i.ssuc 
of ATHLETE) 

May 17, regional golf tournaments for 
boys and girls (sites given below) 

May 21, State Track Meet (Classes A 
A A, and Girls), Lexington 

May 21, State Track Meet (Class AAA). 
Louisville 

May 24-25, Cxirl.s Statt (Jolf Tourna 
ment, Louisville 

May 24-25, Boys' State Golf Tourna- 
ment, Fort Knox 

May 27-28, regional baseball tourna- 
ments (sites given below) 

May 27-28, regional tennis tournamenti- 
for girls and boys (sites given below) 

June 3-4, Boys' and Girls' State Tennis 
Tournaments, Loui.sville 

June 8-9. Statt Baseball Tournament 
Lexington 

In assigning schools to districts and 
regions for spring meets, the principal 
source of information is the blue statement 
form filed by the school principal when he 
enrolls his school in tht Association. If a 
coach is listed for a sport, it is assumed that 
tht school sponsoi's a team in that sport. In 



some instances the coach of a particular sport 
may not have been assigned at the time the 
statement form was filed, and in other in- 
stances the principal may have decided that 
a sport for which a coach was named will 
not be sponsored by the school this year. 

Principals should study the assignment 
ol schools by districts and regions which 
appears below to determine whether or not 
the listings for their schools are correct. The 
State Office should be notified only if the 
name of the school should be added to or 
omitted from any of the lists eriven. 
RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP 

Boone County, Bryan Station, Frankfort, Fort 
Camnbell. Heni-y Clay Lwisville Male, McKf^U, M. M. 
I., Oldham County, Owensboro, Paul G. Blazer, St. 
Joseph Prep., Trinity, Western. 

BASEBALL 
Padueah Region 

Chritsian County District — Attucks. Christian Coun- 
ty, Dawson Springs, Fort Campbell, Hopkinsville, 
Trigg County 

Murray District — Benton, Calloway County, Mur- 
ray. Murray College, Nirth Marshall. South Marshall 

Padueah District— Ballard Memorial, Heath, Lone 
Oak, Reidland, St. Mary. Tilghman 

Mayfield District — Carlisle County, Fancy Farm, 
Fulton County, Hickman County, Lowes, MajrfieW, 
Symsonia 

Caldwell County District— Caldwell County, Crit- 
tenden County, Fredonia, Livingston Central, Lyon 
County 

Owensboro Region 

Henderson District — Henderson County, Providence, 
St. Vincent, Union County, Webster County 

Leitchfield District — Butler County, Caneyville, 
Clarkson, Edmonson County, Grayson County Catholic, 
Leitchfield 

Ohio County District — Breckinridge County, Fords- 
ville, Hancock County, Meade County, Ohio County 

Daviess County District— Calhoun, Daviess County, 
Livermore, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic. St. Mary 

Madisonville District — Earlington, Madisonville, 
Rosenwald, South Hopkins, West Hopkins 

Central City District — Bremen, Central City, 
Drakesboro, Graham, Greenville, Hughes-Kirk, Muh- 
lenberg Central 

Bowling Green Region 

Bowling Green District— Bowling Green, Bristow, 
College, Franklin-Simpson, North Warren. Richards- 
ville, Warren County 

Auburn District, — Adairvllle. Auburn, Lewisburg, 
Olmstead, Russellville, Todd County 

Glasgow District — Allen County. Austin Tracy, 
Glasgow, Hiseville, Park City, Scottsville, Temple Hill 

TompkinsviUe District — Clinton County, Cumber- 
land County, Gamaliel, Metcalfe County, Tompkins- 
viUe 

Caverna District — Caverna, Cub Run, LaRue 
County, Memorial, Munfordville 

North Hardin District— East Hardin, Elizabeth- 
town, Elizabethtown Catholic, Fort Knox, North Har- 
din, West Hardin 

Campbellsville District— Adair County, Campbells- 
ville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. Charles, 
Taylor County 

St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Fredericktown, 
Lebanon Junction, Mt. Washington, St. Catherine, St. 
Joesph Prep., Shepherdsvlile, Springfield, Williisburg 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



Page Three 



Jefferson County Region 

Pleasure Ridge District — Bishop David, Butler, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Valley, Western 

Central District — Ahrens, Central, Flaget, Shawnee 

Trinity District — duPont Manual, Louisville Country 
Day, Louisville Male, Trinity 

Southern District — DeSales, Fairdale, Iroquois, 
Southern, Thomas Jefferson 

Eastern District — Aquinas, Eastern, Kentucky 
MiUtary Inst., Seneca, Waggener, Westport 

St. Xavier District — Atherton, Durrett, Fern Creek, 
St. Xavier 

Newport Region 

St. Henry District — Boone County, Dixie Heights, 
Lloyd, St. Henry, Simon Kenton 

Covington District — Beechwood, Covington Catholic, 
Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow 

Silver Grove District — Bishop Brossart, Campbell 
County, Highlands, Silver Grove, St. Thomas 

Walton-Verona District — Falmouth. Grant County, 
Pendleton, Walton-Verona, Williamstown. 

Newport District — Bellevue, Dayton, Newport, 
Newport Catholic 

Maysville District — Bracken County, Deming, 
Fleming County, Lewis County, Mason County, Mays- 
ville, St. Patrick, ToUesboro 

Lexington Region 

Woodford County District — Anderson, Frankfort, 
Franklin County, Georgetown, Scott County, Woodford 
County 

Bourbon County District — ^Bourbon County, Harri- 
son County, Millersburg Military Inst., Nicholas Coun- 
ty, Paris 

Garrard County District— Boyle County, Danville, 
Garrard County, Harrodsburg, Jessamine County, Ken- 
tucky School for the Deaf, Mercer County, Stanford 

ShelbyviUe District— Lincoln Institute, Oldham 
County, Shelby County, ShelbyviUe, TaylorsviUe 

Liberty District— Brodihead, Casey County, Crab 
Orchard, Liberty, McKinney, Memorial, Mt. Vernon 

Eminence District- Carroll County, Eminence, Gal- 
latin County, Henry County, Owen County, Trimble 
County 

Lexington District— Bryan Station, Henry Clay, La- 
fayette, Lexington Catholic, Tates Creek 

Richmond District— Berea, Estill County, Irvine, 
Madison, Madison Central, Model 

London Region 

Somerset District- Burnside, Eubank, Ferguson, 
Pulaski, Somerset 

Lee County District- Clay County, Lee County, Mc- 
Kee, Oneida Institute, Owsiley County, Powell County, 
Riverside Christian 

Harlan District— Cumberland, Evarts, Harlan, Hall, 
Lynch 

Elkhorn City District— Belfry, Elldiorn Qty, Flem- 
ing-Neon, Jenkins, Johns Creek, Phelps, Pikeville, 
Virgie 

Hazel Green District — ^Bush, Hazel Green, Lily, 
London 

Monticello District — ^McCreary County, MonticeUo, 
Pine Knot, Russell County 

Middlesboro District— Barbourville, Bell County, 
Corbin, Lone Jack, Middlesboro, Whitley County, Wil- 
liamsburg 

Hazard District — ^Buckhom, Combs Memorial, Haz- 
ard, Leslie County, Letcher, M. C. Napier, Whitesburg 
Morehead Region 

Ashland District— Ashland, Boyd County, Catletts- 
burg, Fairview, Louisa 

South Portsmouth District — Greenup, McKell, Race- 
Ismd, Russell, South Portsmouth, Wurtland 



Montgomery County District— Bath Coimty, George 
Rogers Clark, Menifee County, Montgomery County, 
Mt. Steriing 

Morehead District— Breckinridge Training, Ezel, 
Hitchins, Olive HUl, Prichard, Rowan County, Sandy 
Hook, Morgan County 

Paintsville District— Blaine, Flat Gap, Inez, Meade 
Memorial, Oil Springs, Paintsville, Van Lear, Warfield 

McDowell District— Garrett, Martin, Maytown, VIc- 
Dowell, Prestonsburg, Wheelwright 

GOLF FOR GIRLS 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, CampbelLs- 
viUe, Clarkson, College, Hopkinsville, Owensboro, 
Tompkinsville, Warren County 

Jefferson County Region — Eastern, Fern Creek, 
Oldham County, Westport 

Lexington Region — Beechwood, Frankfort, Clark 
County, London, Somerset 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Hazard, Paintsville 
GOLF FOR BOYS 

Princeton Region — Benton, Caldwell County, Chris- 
tian County, Crittenden County, Ft. Campbell, Fulton, 
Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Murray, North Marshall, Padu- 
cah, St. Mary 

Bowling Green Region — Adair County, Allen Coun- 
ty, Bowling Green, College, Elizabethtown, Ehzabeth- 
town Catholic, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, RusseUville, 
Scottsville, Tompkinsville, Warren County 

Owensboro Region — Daviess County, GreenviUe, 
Henderson County, Madisonville, Meade County, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic, F^rovidence, St. Vincent, 
Todd County 

Bardstown Region — Bardstown, Bloomfield, Boyle 
bounty, CampbellsvUle, Danville, Ft. Knox, Harrods- 
)urg, Lebanon, Lebanon Junction, Old Kentucky Home, 
it. Joseph, Shepherdsville, Springfield 

Frankfort Region— Clark County, Frankfort, Frank- 
lin County, Harrison County, Henry Clay, Jessamine 
County, Lafayette, Millersburg JWilitary Inst., Mt. Ster- 
ling, Oldham County, Paris, ShelbyviUe 

East Jefferson County Region — Atherton, Durrett, 
Eastern, Fern Creek, Kentucky Military Inst., Louis- 
ville Country Day, St. Xavier, Seneca, Thomas Jeffer- 
son, Trinity, Waggener, Westport 

West Jefferson County Region — Ahrens, Bishop 
David, Butler, DeSales, duPont Manual, Fairdale, Fla- 
get, Iroquois, Male, Pleasure Ridge Park, Shawnee, 
Southern, Valley, Western 

Covington Region — ^Beechwood, Campbell County, 
Covington Catholic, Dayton, Dixie Heights, Highlands, 
Holmes, Holy Cross, Lloyd, Ludlow, Mason County, 
Maysville, Newport, Newport Catholic, St. Henry 

Somerset Region — Berea, Cumberland, Foundation, 
Garrard County, Harlan, Irvine, Knox Central, London, 
Lynch, Madison, Madison Central, McCreary County, 
Middlesboro, Model, Somerset 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Breck- 
inridge Training, Fairview, Hazard, Jenkins, Martin, 
Maytown, Paintsville, PikeviUe, Prichard, Prestonsburg, 
Russell 

TENNIS FOR GIRLS 

Murray Region— Ft. Campbell, Henderson, Hender- 
son County, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Murray 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, College, 
Greensburg, Owensboro, Warren County 

Memorial (HardyvUle) Region— CampbellsvUle, Ca- 
verna, Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown Catholic, LaRue 
County, Meade County, Memorial, Taylor Coimty 

West Jefferson County Region— Butler, Central, 
Fairdale, Holy Rosary, Loretto, Thomas Jefferson 

East Jefferson County Region— Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Lady of Mercy Academy, Presentation, Shelby- 
viUe, Ursuline Academy, Waggener 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



Belle\aie Region — Beechwood, BelleNoie. Highlands, 
Llo>-d, Notre Dame Academy 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Breckinridge Training, 
Fairview. Russell 

Richmond Region — Franklin County, Hazel Green, 
Hennry Clay, London, McCreary Countj', Somerset, 
Woodford County. 

TENNIS FOR BOYS 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, Caldwell 
County, Caverna, College, Ft. Campbell, Franklin- 
Simpson, Glasgow, Hopkinsville. Madisonville, Mem- 
orial, Russellville, Warren Countj' 

M'est Jefferson Region — Aquinas, Bishop David 
Butler, Fairdale, Iroquois, Pleasure Ridge Park, Sou- 
thern, Thomas Jefferson, Valley, Western 

Fort Knox Region — Campbellsville, EUzabethtown, 
Elizabethtown Catholic, Greensburg, Henderson, Hen- 
derson County, LaRue County, Meade County, Owens- 
boro, St. Joseph Prep. 

East Jefferson Region— Durretl, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Kentucky Military Inst., Louisville Country Day, 
Seneca, Trinity, Waggener, \\'estport 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, DeSales, du- 
Pont Manual, Flaget, Male, Shawnee, Si. Xavier 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevuo, Covington 
Catholic, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Mason 
County, Mays\'ille, Newport, Newport Catholic 

Lexington Region — Danville, Franklin County, 
Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Henry Clay, Lafayette. 
Montgomery County, Millersburg Military Inst., Shelby- 
ville 

Richmond Region — Ashland, Breckinridge Training. 
Foundation, Garrard County, Hazel Green, London. 
McCreary County, Prichard, Somerset 



Approved Official 

Since the lists of higher rated officials 
appeared in the January and February Is- 
sues of the ATHLETE, one additional offi- 
cial has qualified for the Approved rating. 
He is Jim DowTiey, Paducah, Kentucky. 



A Rah Deal For Athletic Students 

By Dr. Max Rafferty, Superintendent 

of Public Instruction, California 

If there is one stereotype irrevocably 
embedded in the great body of American 
folklore, it is that of the muscle-bound and 
moronic campus athlete. He is today and has 
been for many years the butt of so many 
"avant garde" jokes that he has become a 
permanent cliche, like the college widow and 
the absent-minded professor. 

The sophisticates claim the athlete is 
stupid. Yet in every high school where I'vf 
ever worked, the grade-point average of the 
athletes was above that of the student body 
as a whole. 

The lank-haired leaders of our current 
literati sneer at the varsity letterman for 
his .iuvenile enthusiasms and his willingness 
to die for dear old Rutgers. But they them- 
selves are quite openly and ardently guilty 
of enthusiasms over such strange causes as 
the apotheosis of Joan Baez and the possible 
canonization of Mario Savio, and they seem 
ready to die at a moment's notice for a smile 



from Ho Chi-Minh or even for the slightest 
relaxation of the built-in scowl of Mao Tse- 
tung. 

By comparison, dying for Rutgers has 
its points. The intellectual vials of wrath are 
constantly overflowing onto the hapless head 
of the athlete because of his hopeless Philis- 
tinism and his alleged inability to communi- 
cate with his peers save in monosyllable 
grunts. 

Yet the halls of Congress and the board 
rooms of giant industrial complexes are 
alike populated by a striking number of ex- 
athletes who seem to have no difficulty 
whatever in communicating, and the Phillis- 
tine mentality of such former contenders on 
the playing fields as Douglas MacArthur, 
John F. Kennedy and Justice Byron (Whiz- 
zer) White may be left safely for history to 
.I'udge. 

It is presently fashionable to condemn 
athletic scholarships as anti-intellectual, and 
to demand that the alumni stop recruiting 
burly sons of coal miners to advance the 
colors of old alma mater every Saturday af- 
ternoon. 

Why? 

If an athletic scholarship will permit a 
youngster who couldn't otherwise afford 
four years at Random U. to go there, what's 
wrong with that? And as for coal miners' 
sons, we don't have enough of them in col- 
lege either. 

If I had my way I'd abolish all the 
hypocritical recruiting restrictions which 
furnish such regular and sensational fodder 
for our newspaper sports pages, and I would 
substitute instead the following very simple 
rules for athletes in our institutions of 
higher learning: 

1. Any individual or organization which 
wants to seek out muscular young men and 
pay their way through college is welcome to 
do so. 

2. The muscular young men must pass 
the same entrance exams and meet the same 
scholastic requirements as their less muscu- 
lar classmates. 

3. The athlete's course of study must 
be of comparable status and difficulty with 
that of the non-athlete. 

4. Nobody gets any special considera- 
tion in testing or grading, and flunk-out 
rules apply to evervone equally. 

These four little commandments would 
do the trick, I think. As the annual football 
season gets under wav, I have to confess a 
lifelong fondness for the gridiron gladiators. 
Over the vears, I have seen a remarkable 
number of them fiorhting and even dvine for 
their country, and remarkably few of them 
ending up in jail or taking the Fifth Amend- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



Page Five 



ment before a Congressional investigating 
committee. They seem to be conspicuously 
absent from Communist-inspired demonstra- 
tions and filthy speech movements. 
RAH ! RAH ! RAH ! 



Elementary School Sports 

By James Frank 

The question of wfhen to begin organized 
competitive sports has challenged educators 
in the United States for a very long time. 
History tells us that the Greeks were vitally 
concerned about the effects of competitive 
sports upon immature participants. In re- 
cent times, the argument has centered upon 
the desirability of conducting athletic com- 
petition on the junior high school level, and 
more recently, that certain selected sports 
such as basketball, softball, volleyball, and 
track should be initiated in the fifth or sixth 
grade. ' ' 

There are many individuals and organiz- 
ations who view with distaste and appre- 
hension the idea of interschool competition 
below the high school level. Clyde Knapp and 
Harry A. Combes listed the principal objec- 
tions to elementary interschool basketball as 
follows : 

1. Boys are in a period of rapid growth 
and consequent bodily weaknesses and mal- 
adjustments, partial ossification of bones, 
emotional stresses, and physiological read- 
justments. 

2. Interscholastics are likely to produce 
over-stimulation and over-excitement; conr 
seauently bovs may "push themselves too 
far" ohvsically and emotionally. 

3. A few boys are likelv to get more 
than their share of use of facilities, time, 
and teacher services, thus deoriving others 
of opDortunities for play. T^^lementary school 
is not the olace for soecialization. 

4. While interschool competition under 
well-controlled conditions may be wholesome 
for bovs of this age, programs that start 
with satisfactory controls 'have a way of 
"getting out of hand" throue^h emulation of 
high school and college practices. 

5. A satisfactory time allotment for 
physical education classes plus well-con- 
ceived intramural and recreational programs 
can meet the needs and desires for competi- 
tion. 

Other objections may be listed, but they 
will generally fall within the categories 
listed above. These objections represent a 
valid argument against interschool sports on 
the elementary and junior high: school level 
if such programs emphasize winning so 
much that questionable and even unfair and 



dishonest practices are condoned. However, 
it is not a valid argument against programs 
where these conditions do not exist. 

There is a preponderance of research 
which refutes such objections. It seems rea- 
sonable to believe that many of the fears 
regarding elementary interscholastic sports 
are mere opinion, and are not supported bj'' 
scientific research findings. 

Research Findings 

G. Lawrence Rarick states: 

"The drive for physical activity is 
strong in the young. Free, unrestricted mus- 
cula movement is believed by psychologists 
to constitute one of the great hungars of 
life, a hungar in the young equal in intensi- 
ty to that of food and rest. Physiologists 
recognize that human tissues and organs re- 
spond positively to healthy use and that 
with continued disuse these structures tend 
to atrophy." 

A logical interpretation would be that 
this drive for physical activity should be 
satisfied. The growth pattern is progressive 
and systematic. The rate and level of an in- 
dividual's realization of potentials are form- 
ed during the early years of life. Evidence 
indicates that the effects of participation 
upon growth has very little noticeable effect 
on height. However, activity tends to accen- 
tuate lateral growth, i.e., increase in breadth 
and girth measures. Most research studies 
have shown that the children with stronger 
and firmer muscles, with sturdier physiques 
and less adipose tissue are those children 
who lead an active and vio-orous childhood. 
The imolication is umistakablv clear — what 
a nerson "could be" and "hopes" to be is 
ultimately determined, to a large degree, by 
what he does during these formative elemen- 
tary school years. 

In summarizing the effects of exercises, 
Steinhaus lists three chief results" (1) gain 
in strength, (2) improvement in endurance, 
and (3) perfection of movement. The inter- 
school program offers an excellent oppor- 
tunintv for the achievement of these bene- 
fits, provided the program is well super- 
vised and controlled. In a well organized uro- 
gram there should not be a sinele incident 
where a child is allowed to go beyond the 
stage of healthful fatigue to harmful 
exhaustion. Accidents can and will occur 
during competitive plav, but they should not 
be the results of neo'lieence on the part of 
the teac'her because of a lack of knowledge 
or a desire to win the contest. Physical edu- 
cation teachers can prevent participants 
from "pushinsr t'^em^selves too far" phvsical- 
Iv and emotionally. Snffefestions as to hnw 
this can be accomplished are included in the 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



THP KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 

For sheei couragf . hnnosty and know 
ledge of basketball officiating, the name.^ 
of Norman Hammonds and Jim Nixon oi 
Hupkinsvillf top the Flying Dutchman's list. 
These two arbiters have won the admiratiorL 
oJ the Dutchman and th( respect of all 
Western Kentuckians because they proved 
conclusively in a game between Paducah 
Tilghman and Lone Oak that they call the 
game by the rules without fear or favor. The 
morning after this game, which was decided 
by a last-second decision by the officials, 
the Dutchman started getting telephone 
calls from newspapers throughout the Pur- 
chase, fans and officials, asking about the 
decision which Norman and Jim bad made 
and which decided the game by one point. 

My friend. Jack Anderson, Sports Edi- 
tor of the Paducah Sun Democrat, called, 
followed by two more calls from Bob Swish- 
er, Sports Announcer of Paducah's WPSD- 
TV, indicating that just about everybody in 
western Kentucky wanted to know if Nor- 
man and Jim had ruled right on a situation 
which apparently no one 'had ever seen 
before. Not only were Norman and Jim 
right in their call but it would have been 
easier for them and few people would ever 
have known the difference had they possess- 
ed less courage and sacrificed honesty — but 
there is where Norman Hammonds and Jim 
Nixon set an example for every official in 
the United States to pattern from. They 
knew the rules and they knew that the 
correct decision would be controversial but 
they were there to call the game and, 
brethren, they called it. 

Here was the play : With only seconds 
left in the game, with one team trailing by 
one point, the crowd saw the ball in the air 
as the signal went off ending the game and 
they saw the ball drop in the basket with the 
officials disallowing the field goal. Apparent- 
ly nearly 100', of our fans and coaches 
think that, if the ball is in the air when the 
signal sounds to end the game, the basket 
will always count. The basket will always 
count provided the ball is in the air on a 
legitimate try for the basket. In the case 
being discussed, however, the ball was being 
rebounded and batted and it was a batted 
ball which went in the basket. A bat or an 
uncontrolled tap is not a legitimate try, and 
therefore the ball becomes dead when the 
signal sounded to end the game and with it 
in the air. Points cannot be scored with a 
dead ball. Norman and Jim knew this, called 
it accordingly, and thereby set off the fuse 
to a controversy which 'had to be cleared up 
with the help of the newspapers. Jack An- 



derson and Bob Swisher. Bob Swisher went 
on the air to make the following statement 
for the people of western Kentucky: 

"Said Mr. Vettiner, 'If the horn sounded 
while the batted ball was in the air then 
the decision was absolutely correct.' Mr. 
Vettiner also commended the two officials, 
Norman Hammonds and Jim Nixon of Hop- 
kinsville, for possessing the knowledge of 
the rule and having the guts to enforce it. 
So, it all goes back now to whether or not it 
was a controlled tip. It was ruled a slap, not 
a controlled tip. And since the slap did not 
enter the basket or clear the basket before 
the game ended the goal did not count. 

"At the end of last night's program I 
said that the rule was a bad one and the 
only good thing that came out of it all was 
the fact that the game was a regular season 
contest and not a tournament game. But 
maybe something else will come after all. 
Mr. Vettiner himself agrees that the rule is 
a bad one. Ouotine Charlie, 'It seems to me 
that anv time the ball is in the air when the 
game ends and it goes through the boon it 
should count . . . for the purnose of consis- 
tencv. Frankly, I think the rules committee 
should take a look at it.' Mr. Vettiner is sro- 
ine to dispatch a letter to the Executive 
Secretary of the National Rules Committee 
in Chicago and suggest that the problem be 
placed on the agenda for the coming meet- 
ing. 

"So, that's it. It's fin^llv clear to everv- 
one. The srame is over and Lone Oak is still 
the winner, but not without several internre- 
tations of one of the most confused rules 
ever written. A"d while Mr. Vettiner com- 
mended the officials for t>iftir action. I 
would likp to commend the Tilo^hmnn time- 
keener, Mr. Glen Butler, for an honest ap- 
nrai^al of a stickv situation. It mio'ht have 
been inst as easv for Glen to have said that 
the ball was in the basket and e-iven Tilsrh- 
man a victory ... some miorht have. . . but 
Glen didn't. He said definitely the ball was 
in the air which sealed the Tornados' doom. 
Afterward. Glen made one comment: 'I have 
to live with myself.' " 

The Corn Cob Pine of Honor for this 
month goes to one of the ereatest Kentucki- 
ans ever to turn out a state chamnion. The 
gentleman is Mavfield's Jack Storv. Otis 
Dinning recommends Jack for this award 
because of the manv bovs this coach trained 
to be men and because he sets the type of 
examnle which all of us like to have yoimg 
American bovs nattern from. Over the vears 
hundreds of Corn Cob Pine of Honor have 
gone out to manv neonle in manv sections 
of the country each month hut none more 
deserving than Coach Jack Story, who may 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



Page Seven 



have equals but no superiors in the job of 
making men of boys. 

While the Dutchman is usually on the 
sending end of Corn Cob Pipes., Lionheart 
Awards, Abou Ben Adhem, etc., the order 
of things changed this month when a minia- 
ture whistle with the engraving, "Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association Official," 
in the form of a tie tack came in the Dutch- 
man's mail from the Lafayette, Indian, Of- 
ficials Association. Jack Small, President of 
this group, sent a little note saying, "En- 
closed is a small token from the Lafayette 
officials for the job you always do in In- 
diana with the rules discussions." Thanks, 
Jack. The Dutchman will wear this with 
pride. 

This has been the busiest year for bas- 
ketball ruling requests which we have exper- 
ienced in a long time. It is safe to estimate 
that more than 150 coaches, spectators, 
officials and sports writers have called or 
written to ask rulings on various plays. Bas- 
ketball clinic work doesn't end in October. It 
is completed with the final game of the 
State Tournament in March. The one ruling 
called for which caused not only the Dutch- 
man but members of the National Basketball 
Rules Committee to scratch their heads was 
from a gentleman who asked if a team could 
take time out before the game started. It 
seemed that somewhere in Indiana an of- 
ficial was getting ready to toss the ball to 
start a game When a player asked for time 
out. The ruling is that such a time out re- 
quest is not honored. A team is privileged to 
call time out immediately before the start of 
the second half or immediately before the 
start of the second or fourth quarter but a 
team may not take time out until the game 
is started. This precludes the possibility of a 
team taking time out until after the ball has 
been put into play for the start of the game. 

While we are on these rules and rulings, 
the Dutchman sends an S. 0. S. to Cliff 
Fagan, Executive Secretary of the National 
Federation of High School Athletic Associa- 
tions, asking him to put on the agenda for 
rule's study this March the Lone Oak-Padu- 
cah situation when the game ended with a 
batted ball in the air. It would be much less 
confusing to everybody involved if the rule 
stated that any time the game ends with 
the ball in the air that the basket vdll be 
counted if successful. 

The next biof event scheduled by the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
is the annual dinner at the Brown Hotel 
during K. E. A. in Aoril. That is the time 
when the Game Guy of the Year is honored. 
The names of the nominees are even now in 
the hands of the judges, and a brand new 



courageous Game Guy will be presented as 
guest of honor at this dinner. 

In closing this column the following 
thought is dedicated to those officials who 
enforce all the rules of sports courageously: 
The man who is "all wool and a yard wide" 
doesn't shrink from doing his duty. 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 




Dr. Irvin E. Lunger 

Speaker at the Dinner Meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association, 
scheduled to be held in the Crystal Ballroom 
of the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on Thursday 
evening, April 14, 1966, will be Dr. Irvin E. 
Lunger, President of Transylvania College. 
The subject of Dr. Lunger's talk will be 
"The Play Maker." 

Dr. Lunger has been president of Tran- 
sylvania College, Lexington, Kentucky, since 
January 1, 1958. Before becoming the 23rd 
president of the historic college, Dr. Lunger 
served first as professor of religion and 
then as academic dean of the college. He 
joined the faculty of Transylvania in 1955. 

Dr. Lunger's leadership has brought 
about many changes in the college. He has 
reorganized the college both administrative- 
ly and academically. He has raised the aca- 
demic level of the college by strengthening 
the faculty, establishing higher standards of 
student selection, exoanding library and lab- 
oratory facilities and by securing new class- 
room buildings and dormitories. Transyl- 
vania is now recognised as one of the finest 
small liberal arts colleges in the countrv. 

A popular speaker. Dr. Lunger is in de- 
mand for educational, civic, church meetines 
and conferences throughout the country and 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



has made many appearances on radio and 
television. He served from 1962-65 as presi- 
dent of the board of directors of Lexington's 
United Community Fund. He is a member of 
the Lexington Kiwanis Club, the boards of 
the Henry Clay Foundation, The Lexington- 
Fayette County Foundation, The Citizens 
Association for Planning in Lexington, and 
Lexington's Sayre School. In February, 1961, 
Dr. Lunger was named "Distinguished Bro- 
therhood Citizen" by the Lexington Chapter, 
National Conference of Christians and Jews. 

Listed in Who's Who in America, Presi- 
dent Lunger is a member of the Governor's 
Commission on Higher Education in Ken- 
tucky and the Commission on Colleges and 
Universities of the Kentucky Association of 
Colleges, Secondary and Elementary Schools. 
He has served on the Commission on Chris- 
tian Higher Education of the Association of 
American Colleges, and is a former chair- 
man of the executive committee of the Board 
of Higher Education of the Christian 
Churches. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Dr. Lunger 
received his Bachelor of Arts degree magna 
cum laude from Bethany College, Bethany, 
West Virginia, w'here he was a member of 
Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. He earned the 
Master of Arts, Bachelor of Divinity and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, and had a year of special 
study at the University of Munich in Ger- 
many. 

In 1959 Dr. Lunger was awarded the 
honorary Doctor of Literature degree by 
Bethany College, and in 1965 the honorary 
Doctor of Humane Letters degree by the 
University of Alabama. 

STATE TOURNEY TIME 

The magic spell is in the air. 
The din of battle's near; 

The toss, the tip, the shout goes up, 
State tourney time is here. 

The "Sweet Sixteen" have made the trip 
In search of schoolboy fame. 

To grab the headline banners bold 
Of how to play the game. 

From goal to goal along the boards 
They bounce the leathered sphere. 

Play man to man or in the zone. 
Conserve the time so dear. 

They sight and fire and pray a bit 
To hear the swish of net. 

Exult and smile when aim is true, 
When not, break out in sweat. 

It's madness, yes, but who would trade 
This scene for other clime? 

There's none to rival old Kaintuck' 
When its state tourney time. 

By Ehner Kelley 
WFMW Radio 
MadisonviUe, Kentuclqr 



STATE WRESTLING TOURNAMENT 

The 1966 State High School Wrestling 
Tournament was held at the Seneca High 
School, Louisville, on February 11-12. The 
Kentucky School for the Blind won the 
tournament with 68 points, one point ahead 
of the Newport Catholic High School. KSB 
also had the meet's "Most Outstanding 
Wrestler" in James Earl Hardin, who won in 
the 165-pound weight division. Hardin re- 
ceived similar recognition in 1963 and 1965. 

The tournament was managed by Wrest- 
ling Committee Chairman Orville Williams. 
It was the third tournament sponsored by 
the K.H.S.A.A. Sixteen teams participated 
in the tournament. They finished in this 
order: 1-Kentucky School for the Blind, 68; 
2-Newport Catholic, 67 ; 3-North Hardin, 58 ; 
4-Bardstown St. Joseph, 53 ; 5-Seneca, 50 ; 6- 
Westport, 36; 7- (Tie) Hopkinsville and Fla- 
get, 31; 9-Fort Campbell, 22; 10-Millersburg 
Military Institute, 20; ll-Oldham County, 
15; 12-Caldwell County, 6; 13- (Tie) Fern 
Creek and Eastern, 4; 15-Bush, 0; 16-Trigg 
County, 0. 

The KSB team had been coached by W. 
Edward Murray, Jr., who was assisted by 
Will D. Evans, a member of the State Wrest- 
ling Committee. Mr. Evans had previously 
served as full-time coach for eight years. 

The referees were Larry Quinn of New 
Albany, Indiana, and Gary Ingraham of 
Louisville. 

Medals were awarded to the first three 
places in each class. These winners were as 
follows : 

95 lb.— Crawford, North Hardin; Bell, 
Seneca; Kohn, Ft. Campbell 

103 lb.— Dickerson, KSB; Bragg, North 
Hardin ; Monti, Newport Catholic 

112 lb. — ^(^ibbons, Hopkinsville; Nie- 
porte, Newport Catholic; Flint, KSB 

120 lb.— McKay, St. Joseph; Hillerich, 
Flaget ; Cook, KSB 

127 lb.— Crowe, KSB; Donlon, Flaget; 
McGlone, Newport Catholic 

133 lb. — Myledo, North Hardin; Myers, 
KSB; Howard, St. Joseph 

138 lb. — Moore, St. Joseph; Schneider, 
Newport Catholic; Eldridge, Oldham County 

145 lb. — Williams, Seneca; Chilton, 
Hopkinsville; White, Flaget 

154 lb.— Fey, Newport Catholic; Tho- 
mas, St. Joseph ; Knopf. Oldham County 

165 lb.— Hardin, KSB; Shelton, North 
Hardin ; Void, Westport 

180 lb.— Keal, Westport; Schneider, 
Newrvort Catbolic; Lawrence, Hopkinsville 

Heavyweight — Anderson, M.M.I. ; Karem 
Seneca; Goetz, Newport Catholic 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



Page Nine 



KAPOS NEWS 
Sta?e Tournament Plans 

On February 10 the members of the 
executive board of KAPOS met at the Ken- 
tucky Hotel to discuss plans for the week of 
the State Tournament. It was decided to 
have a welcome booth in the lobby of the 
Kentucky Hotel. Please stop by to : register 
your squad, get your hotel room assignment, 
and pick up your envelope containing 
KAPOS handlDook and tournament informa- 
tion. The handbook contains information 
pertaining to the membership of KAPOS. 
basis for awarding of the trophies, events to 
be offered by the hospitality committee, 
brackets, and the times for the games, etc. 

Perhaps you would like to have a part 
in making known to the public just what is 
involved in being a cheerleader sponsor. If 
so, we can use you for radio and possibly tele- 
vision interviews. Mrs. Jane McCoy of Ft. 
Knox High School will be responsible for 
making the contacts for interviews. Please 
let her know if you will be available and will- 
ing to be interviewed. 

Trophies To Be Awarded 

Both a winner's and a runner-up cup 
will be given to the outstanding cheerleading 
groups at the 1966 State Tournament. Third 
place in the judging will be given honorable 
mention recognition. Shelby County High 
School won the first place award last year. 
Lexington Dunbar and Owensboro tied for 
second place. 

All cheerleaders are asked to wear their 
cheerleader uniforms for the final Saturday 
night game. Photographers will be present 
to take pictures of the winners, so be pre- 
pared to represent your school in a fashion 
to make them proud of you. 

The sponsors of the winner and runner- 
up schools are asked to come to the floor 
with their cheerleaders. Besides getting the 
recognition you so well deserve, it is another 
way of letting the public know that cheer- 
leading is important enough in the school's 
curriculum to merit a "sponsor-coach". 
Scholarship Award To Be Continued 

Miss Paula Gayle Davis, our second 
scholarship recipient, is a first year student 
at the Kentucky Southern College in Louis- 
ville. We are proud to learn that she made 
the Dean's academic list for the first semes- 
ter, and that she is an alternate on the 
cheerleader squad. 

In order to be eligible for the scholar- 
shio the applicant must show evidence of 
outstanding academic ability and indicated 
need for financial assi=?tance. The applicant 
must have been a cheerleader for at least 
two years, and the school must be a member 



in good standing in the Kentucky Associa- 
tion of Pep Organization Sponsors. 

Scholarship applications may be ob- 
tained from Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, College of 
Education, University of Kentucky. You will 
also be able to obtain them at the KAPOS 
booth in Freedom Hall during the state 
tournament. 

Governor Breathitt Declares Sportsmanship Week 

Being a good sport is part of being a 
good cheerleader, a good athlete, a good citi- 
zen. KAPOS doesn't believe that good citi- 
zens need to be reminded to exemplify good 
sportsmanship. However, it is especially fit- 
ting at tournament time to remind all citi- 
zens that it is a privilege to be able to at- 
tend the games, and that they can contribute 
to the success of the tournament if they will 
abide by the KAPOS Sportsmanship Creed 
proclaimed by Governor Breathitt: 
PROCLAMATION 

Whereas, The Kentucky Association of 
Peo Organization Sponsors upholds all stand- 
ards of good sportsmanship as its aim; and 

Whereas, KAPOS believes that good 
sportsmanship contributes to the foundation 
of the democratic way of life through the 
application of the Golden Rule; and 

Whereas, KAPOS urges that the ideals 
of good SDortsmanship be practiced not only 
during this week but throughout the year; 
and 

Whereas, the Kentucky Hieh School 
Ba'jketball tournament will be held during 
this week and the maioritv of Kentuckians 
vdll he following the games; and 

Whereas, good sportsmanship is the ob- 
ligation of all citizens, and Kentuckians need 
to be made aware of this responsibility. 

NOW, THEREFORE. I, Edward Breath- 
itt, Governor of the State of Kentucky, do 
hereby proclaim this week as Good Sports- 
mans'hip Week in Kentucky, and urge all 
citizens of this state to uphold all standards 
of good sportsmanshin rot only during 
the tournament but at all times. 
Attention, Principals! 

Included in the packet that will be given 
to the winner in the regional tournament 
finals will be a letter pertaining to cheer- 
leaders. The letter will contain the informa- 
tion concerning the basis of selecting out- 
standing cheerleader sauads. and will request 
that the principal send written confirmation 
that the c'heerleaders of his school are being 
chaperoned by a well qualified, school-ap- 
proved adult. The name of the sponsor 
should be included in this confirmation letter 
and given to the KAPOS board member at 
the registration booth in the lobby of the 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



Kentucky Hotel. 

Dates To Remember 

March 19 — Saturday Morning Coffee. 
KAPOS extends a cordial invitation for ALL 
sponsors and cheerleaders to join them for 
coffee and sweet rolls on Saturday morning 
from 9:30' until 11:00 at the Kentucky Ho- 
tel. Look for the room number on the day's 
bulletin board in the lobby of the hotel. 

August 8-12 — Summer Cheerleader 
Clinic. The Kentucky Chearleader Associa- 
tion announces the Sixth Annual Summer 
Cheerleader Clinic. The clinic will be held on 
the University of Kentucky Campus. Bro- 
chures can be obtained at the KAPOS booth 
or by contacting: Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Mrs. 
Milly V. Rodes, or Mrs. Stella S. Gilb. 
NOTE TO ALL ADMINISTRATORS 
KAPOS needs judges, ho^el chaperones, and per- 
sonnel to man booths at the hotel and at Freedom 
Hall. This Involves at least 12 to 16 people. It is also 
back-breaking, tiresome work. However, we have many 
dedicated women who have indicated a willingness to 
help share these duties provided they get an **ok" 
from their administrators. Therefore, the KAPOS board 
is seeking your understanding and cooperation; should 
you be asked to release a teacher from her duties to 
help carry on the work that KAPOS is doing to make 
cheerleading a worthwhile educational experience in 
the State of Kentucky. 

Stella S. Gilb 

Executive Secretary-Treasurer 

It Just Shouldn't Be 

It shouldn't be but high school basket- 
ball's biggest problem remains unchanged — 
and unsolved. 

The problem: Attitude — particularly 
of coaches — toward officials. 

Basketball has no greater eyesore than 
a coach who doesn't know how to act like a 
leader and an educator on the sidelines. 
There is nothing in the game more distaste- 
ful than a coach — in complete violation of 
the bench conduct rule — who rants and 
raves and, worst of all, incites. 

Nobody is asking a coach to be imper- 
vious to the excitement and suspense of an 
important game or not to be frustrated by a 
call that could have gone either way. But 
there is no place for a coach who jumps up 
and down — or strips off his coat and hurls 
it into the bleachers ! 

We would like to be able to say that the 
undisciplined coach draws all the blame for 
this key problem in basketball. But there is 
a companion contributor in these critical 
situations. That "companion" is the official 
liimself — the man who has the authority, 
but doesn't use it, to keep unrestrained 
coaches in line. There is natural reluctance, 
of course, on the part of officials to use their 



power in this area. But their failure to do so 
often contributes to the possibility of losing 
control of a game — and most assuredly it 
contributes to the delinquency of the coach. 

Tournament-time is just around the cor- 
ner, so this is a good time for reminders : To 
the coach who should not merely be guided 
by the rule but also by the spirit of the rule 
that calls for proper conduct on the sidelines, 
and to the official who should not hesitate 
- — for the sake of maintaining proper control 
— to blow the whistle at an offending coach. 

It just shouldn't be, not at all, that we 
have a problem like this! — WIAA Bulletin 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SPORTS 

(Continued from Page Five) 
recommendations at the end of this paper. 

Concern has been voiced over the dan- 
ger of injury to boys during this period of 
rapid growth and consequent bodily weak- 
ness such as partial ossification of bones. In 
one survey of orthopedic surgeons, 85 per 
cent recommended that participation in com- 
petitive SDorts be limited to those who are 
physiologically mature. A later survey indi- 
dicated that orthopedic surgeons would not 
recommend that there be any difference 
between the sports program on the junior 
high school level and that on the senior high 
school level. 

The question which probably comes to 
mind is, what relevancy do these studies 
'have to competitive sports on the elemen- 
tary school level? Regardless of what survey 
is selected to substantiate a particular point 
of view, the essential point is that the boys 
should be physioloeically mature. A study 
by Williams and Scott, showed the imnort- 
ance of activitv during infancy. Two groups 
of Negro infants from different socioeco- 
nomic backgrounds were compared. 

The low group displayed significant ac- 
celeration in motor activities. The result was 
attributed to the absence of play pens, cribs, 
and high chairs, which are c'hiaracteristic of 
the low socioeconomic group. Research and 
experience have also shown that many boys 
in the fifth and sixth grade are physiologic- 
ally mature to participate in a modified pro- 
gram of interscholastic sports. 

Psychological and Sociological Effects 

The other aspect of this problem is the 
effect of competition in athletics upon the 
psychosocial development of the child. The 
(research) findings resolve to a large mea- 
sure the issues of physiological harm or 
benefit to the pre-hieh school younester. 
But no onalitative assessment can be placed 
on the effect of earlv interscholastic compe- 
tition on the psychosocial development of the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



Page Eleven 



immature participant. The evidence from 
scientific investigations relative to behavior- 
al changes which accrue from sports partici- 
pation is far from conclusive. Most of the 
arguments which have been advanced, either 
positive or negative, are perhaps based upon 
erroneous assumption or upon isolated cases. 
In summarizing this situation, Seymour in 
his study tated: 

"It would seem prudent to exercise cau- 
tion in ascribing with any degree of certain- 
ty behavioral changes, whether desirable or 
undesirable, to Little League Baseball or to 
any comparable program for youth." 

S'kubic made a similar statement on the 
availability of the information relative to 
this topic. 

"In order to completely solve the prob- 
lem of highly organized competition, data 
must be gathered relative to the physical, 
sociological, psychological, and economic 
aspect of competition. Furthermore, to re- 
solve the specific controversy concerning 
emotional effects of competition, it is neces- 
sary that additional data be secured, particu- 
larly in regard to the influence of emotion 
on personality now and later in life." 

In view of the inconclusiveness of the 
available evidence, it appears quite feasible 
to initiate competitive programs on the fifth 
and sixth grade levels within a specified 
framework to see and test some of the reac- 
tions. For too long, we have assumed that 
the sports program on the elementary and 
junior high school level will run into the 
same pitfalls as some of our programs on 
the high school and college level. 

We are reasonably sure that competi- 
tive sports provide a chance for the child to 
assess his reaction to development forces. 
This competitive sport provides a challenge, 
and a consequent early opportunity for the 
child to find indications of his pattern of 
reaction to different situations and ultimate- 
ly to life itself. 

Educational Values 

The competitive element is important 
at this stage of a child's life, and it should 
not be minimized or shunted aside. So of- 
ten, people tend to view competition and co- 
operation as being inimical, but they are 
complementary, and development in both 
is part of the education of young people. 
Rather than attempt to eliminate competi- 
tion, schools should seek to help young people 
learn to compete without rancor in friendly 
situations. Children are going to play the 
popular seasonal sport in sandlots., in 
YMCA's, in vacant lots, in alleys and play- 
gi'ounds — why not provide it for them in 
the intersoholastic program? Competition 
constitutes the heart of athletics. 



Competition is good or bad depending 
upon the strategic position of the person 
who contemplates it, upon its goals, and up- 
on the secondary attributes and cii'cum- 
stances surrounding its manifestations. 

Thus, the task of the physical educator 
becomes one of properly guiding competition 
so that the many advantages of competition 
can be achieved by the participant. 

The interscholastic athletic program 
starting at the fifth grade can be education- 
al in nature; it can provide the opportunity 
for participants with superior athletic skill 
to fully develop and utilize this talent 
through organized competition with students 
from other schools. The gifted should be- 
come more gifted, and the less gifted should 
receive the full benefits of an organized in- 
tramural program. 

It would appear that an elementary 
school program of interscholastic sports 
could operate within the framework outlined 
below. 

1. The school and community support 
such a program and agree to the proposition 
that no outside spectators be admitted to 
the athletic contests. 

2. As a foundation, all students should 
have broad, varied, and graded programs of 
physical education under competent instruc- 
tion through all grades. 

3. Based upon a sound, comprehensive 
instructional and intramural program; tea- 
chers of physical education should select the 
more highly skilled to participate in the in- 
terscholastic program. The participants 
selected will participate only if they so de- 
sire. 

4. The development of desirable habits 
of behaviour in all competitive situations 
should be stressed. 

5. A broad program of intramural activ- 
ities should be provided for all. but especial- 
ly for those students not of interscholastic 
caliber. 

6. The athletic contests should be play- 
ed immediately after school, and no team 
should be permitted to travel outside the 
immediate neighborhood. 

7. Medical Examinations should be given 
to all participants to insure they are physi- 
cally able to participate in the program. 

8. Some form of evaluation should be 
used to measure the extent to which state 
objectives are being achieved. 

Of course, the opponents of such a pro- 
gram will contend that the same educational 
objectives could be orained in a well conduct- 
ed physical education and intramural pro- 
gram. We are reminded that there is no 
conclusive evidence available to support the 
claims that detrimental character changes 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1966 



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Phone 299-1635 

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Coat Style Sweaters $12.95 & $13.95 

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6" Chenille Letters Plain $ 1.35 

Adidas Track Shoes and Flats (in stock) 

No. 68 Baseballs (Excellent for Practice) $12.95 doz. 

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All Items quickly delivered by United Parcel 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



277-3977 



Dick Wallace 



occur because of participation in competitive 
sports at this early age. Also, much of the 
physiological data has been refuted by other 
research studies. 

Today the overriding responsibility is 
to gather more objective evidence on this 
subject. This challenge looms larger than 
ever before. It can be met by improving our 
physical education program, by initiating 
more interscholastic programs in the upper 
intermediate grades (5-6), and by studying 
these programs relative to the long-term 
psychic, physical, and social patterns in- 
volved. 

The Physical Educator 

Vol. 22 - No. 1 - March, 1965 

GOALS OF ATHLETICS 

(Continued from Page One) 

The professional teams have no limita- 
tions on sponsors and a larere majority are 
cigarette and beer firms. These programs 
are fed into the homes throughout America, 
where the youth of our country are con- 
stantly besieged with the propaganda that 
beer and cigarettes are essential to the good 
life. 

The correlation is left in the youth's 
mind that beer and cigarettes are inducive 



to enjoying athletics, and even in many 
cases to the belief that these items are not 
detrimental to good health and athletic train- 
ing habits. 

This is subtle propaganda which is having 
its effect and which should receive serious 
consideration on the part of all coaches, and 
school administrators so that this viewpoint 
can be countennanded by their counsel and 
instruction. The high school associations 
have never allowed sponsors of athletic con- 
tests to advertise cigarettes or alcoholic 
beverages as it is not in keeping with the 
philosophy of the high school educational 
program. 

Work Constantly 

It is my sincere hope that all school 
administrators, coaches, and teachers, will 
do everything in their power to offset the 
adverse philosophy of professional athletics. 

If a time ever comes w'hen we have to 
adopt the same practices as the professionals 
in promoting athletic activities in hicrh 
school, then we should discontinue athletics. 
They would no longer be educational. The 
main purpose must alwavs be to educate the 
bov through athletic activities so that he 
becomes a 'healthy citizen with the very 
highest ethical character traits. 



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SHELBY COUNTY H.S. BASKETBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A A. CHAMPION- 1966 







P" S2 14. 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Burchfield, John Eddington, Gene Witt, Jobie 
Miller, Bill Busey, Terry Hall, Mgr. Stratton. Second Row: Ass't. Coach Arnold 
Thurman, Larry Glass, Hugh Smith, Jim Simons, Jim Edwards, Mike Casey, Mike 
Popp, Jamie Pickett, Ron Ritter, Bill Moffett, Dave Bohannon. Ass't. Coach Mitchell 
Bailey, Coach Bill Harrell. 

District Tournament Games Won Regional Tournament Games Won 

CL 11 /^ X in-5 ro i_i /-> ± Shelby County.. 119-65. Trimble County 
Shelby County. .103-53 Henry County jhelby County . 85-59 ... Scott County 
Shelby County. ...124-57- Lincoln Institute Shelby County 89-58 Georgetown 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

April, 1966 



i 



LOUISVILLE MALE— RUNNER-UP 
1966 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




, Rick Bolu,, Larry Goodman, Henry Bacon, Cbophus Morris, Ted 
Shelby, Willie Woods, Eugene Smith Chuck Kuhn. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON— SEMI-FINALIST 
1966 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Cocch Carroll, Coac;i Larry Castle, Coach Walsh. Second Row: Mike 
Milton, Gale Daniels, Gilbert, Bob Unseld, Ron Gathright, Jim DeWalt, Bob Redmon, Albert Johnson, Rick 
Gorter, Nat Northington, Billy Jackson, Beckham, Trabue, Freddie Johnson. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 9 



APRIL, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 



NEWLY ELECTED BOARD MEMBERS 




Foster J. Sanders 



Ralph C. Dorsey 



Prin. Foster J. Sanders of the Louisville Male 
High School, currently President of the Board of Con- 
trol, and Supt. Ralph C. Dorsey of the Caverna Inde- 
pendent School District will represent Sections 4 and 
3 respectively on the Board for a four-year period, 
beginning July 1, 1966. Both men v/ill begin their 
second terms as Board members. 

Foster J. Sanders, son of a Methodist minister, 
was bom in Summersville, Kentucky, in Green County, 
on December 12, 1914. A graduate of the Beaver Dam 
High School, he received his A. B. degree from Ken- 
tucky Wesleyan College and his M. A. from the George 
Peabody College. 

From 1936 to 1941 Mr. Sanders coached and taught 
at the ShepherdsviUe High School. From 1941 to 1943 he 
was a Safety Director for the Gopher Ordnance Works 
at Minneapolis, Minnesota. During 1945-46 Mr. Sanders 
was the Principal of the ShepherdsviUe High School, 
and during the period of 1946-55 he was a teacher of 
Social Studies at the Western Junior High School in 
Louisville. During the next six years he was Principal 
of the Western Junior High School, and in 1961 he v/3£ 
named Principal of the Louisville Male High School. 

In 1936 Faster J. Sanders was listed in "Who's 
Who in Colleges and Universities." In 1955 he was 
awarded a Travel Fellowship by the Ford Foundation, 
but he declined this to accept the principalship of the 
Western Junior High School. He is a member of the 
Kentucky Committee of ithe Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, Phi Delta Kappa 
National Educational Fraternity, the Masonic Lodge, 
and the Board of Trustees of the Cooper Memorial 
Methodist Church. 

Mr. Sanders is married to the former Jane McCon- 
nell of Marion, Kentucky, an elementary supervisor in 
the Jefferson County school system. They have two 
children, a daughter, Barbara Longacre, 23, Chemistry 
teacher at Thomas Jefferson High School; and a son, 
Jerry, 20, a senior at the University of Virginia. 

Ralph C. Dorsey, was bom in Scottsville but has 
lived most of his life in Horse Cave. He graduated 
from Horse Cave High School in 1935, later attending 
Indiana University on a basketball scholarship and re- 
ceiving his B.S. degree with a major in Physical 



Education. 

After serving five years in the United States Army 
during World War II, Captain Dorsey returned to his 
home town and served as a teacher and coach for four 
years. During this time he attended summer school at 
Western Kentucky State College and received his M.A. 
degree in 1952. 

The sectional representative lettered in basketball 
and baseball for four years in high school, and he 
received varsity basketball letters for three years at 
Indiana. He was twice an all state high school player 
in Kentucky. From 1950 through 1954 he served as a 
12-grade principal, basketball and baseball coach 'for 
the Caverna High School. For the past eleven years 
he has served as superintendent of the Caverna School 
District and still continues coaching basketball and 
baseball. In 1953 the Caverna High basketball team 
won third place in the state basketball tourney, and 
the 1951 team lost out in the first round of the state 
tourney. 

In 1959, 1960 and 1961 Coach Dorsey's baseball teams 
played in the state tournament, winning the tourna- 
ment in 1961. 

Mr. Dorsey is an active member of the Horse Cave 
Methodist Church where he has served as Church 
School Superintendent, teacher and church lay leader. 
He is currently chairman of the church official board. 
He belongs to the various educational associations at 
the local, state and national levels. He sei'ves actively 
in the Rotary Club and The Chamber of Commerce. 
He has been honored as "Man of the Year" by tlie 
Horse Cave Chamber of Commerce. He is a member 
of the Caverna Memorial Hospital Board of Du'ectors. 
For the past sixteen years Mr. Dorsey has been secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Southern Kentucky Athletic >!'on- 
ference. 



1966 Annual Meeting 

This issue of the ATHLETE went to press just prior 
to the time of the annual meeting of the Association. 
The business meeting of the K.H.S.A.A. was scheduled 
to be held on Thursday. April 14. at 3;00 P.M., in the 
Terrace Room of the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville. The 
dinner meeting was to follow at 6:00 P. M.. and svas 
to be held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Bruwn 
Hotel. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the K.H. 
S.A.A. Constitution, the following changes in the l.'on- 
stitution and By-Laws were to be acted upon by ihe 
Delegate Assembly: 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that By-La^v 29, 
Section 1, be amended to read as follows: "An>- per- 
son who officiates in a football, basketball or baseball 
game between member schools of the Association 
must be registered with the Commissioner and tiiust 
have his official card indicating registration." 
PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes a new By-Law to 
read as follows: "No more than eight teams ma>' be 
(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Tvvo 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



APRIL. 1966 



VOL. XXVIII— NO. 9 



Pablished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hish School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second clas& postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66). Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (1965-69). Murray 

Directors — Mortor. Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Don Davit 
(1963-67). independence; Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse 
Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville: Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville: Oran C. Teater (1964-68). Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



^^om the Commissione'i s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1965-66 Ba.sketball Participation List 
(Elig-ibility) 

2. School'.'^ Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools 
(Basketball) 



HALL OF FAME SCORE BOARD 

Seven new contributions or pledges to 
the Hall of Fame, calling for Group Mem- 
berships at ,'^100 each, have been received 
recently in the K.H.S,A,A. office. Four 
school principals who had made contributions 
on behalf of their schools for smaller 
amounts pledged $100 contributions. 
$100 Contributions and Pledges 

Allen Counts Ezel Ohio County 

Bishop Davie Hailaii Ovvensboro 

Bloomfield Hazard Paducah Tilghniaii 

Bourbon Cdiii.i Henry Clil^ Pikeville 

Breathitt Inez Pleasure Ridge Pari- 

Calhoun Ky. School for Deal Reidland 

Caneyvilk Leslie County Rowan County 

Carr Creel Livingston Cent in . St. Mary's (Whitesvillc I 

Caverna Logan Co. A. A. Sayre 

Covington Catln.ii. Mason Count.\ Tales Creek 

Daviess Count.\ Midway Tompkinsvillc 

Dayton M. M. I. Valley 

Durrett Morgan Count.x 

Contributions Less Than $100 

Beechwood Holmes Prichard 

Campbell Ccnail\ Knott Coum^ Pulaski Countv 

Campbellsvill. Monticelk. Shopville 

Central Nano Somerset 

Fergusor. Paintsville Wayne Counts 



Baseball ITnipiret- 

The Association is beginning registration ol base 
ball umpires this year for the first time. Several men 
have been (iesignated as area elinic directors. Thej 
attended the First School for Baseball Umpires, helcl 
in Lexington on February 5, 1966, conducted by Athletic 
Director Harr\ Stephenson ol Transylvania College. 
State Baseball Clinic Director. They are currently 
conducting baseball clinics to which officials and 
coaches are invited. Clinic attendance is not required 
for the 1966 season, but umpires and coaches are 
urged to attend at least one meeting. Umpires may 
secure application cards from the clinic director or 
may write directly to the State Office. 

The names and addresses of the area clinic direc- 
tors are as follows: W. P. "Dub" Russell. Murray 
High School, Murray; Al Giordano, Caldwell County 
High School. Princeton; Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont; 



Bob Gour. Military Science Dept., WKSC. Bowling 
Green; Shelby Winfrey, 315 Sharon Drive, Campbells- 
ville; Eddie Eyl, 2252 Bradford Drive, Louisville; Roy 
Cline, 1194 Lincoln Avenue, Louisville; James Kid- 
well, 1112 Parkway, Covington; Harry Stephenson, 
1612 Hawthorne Drive, Lexington; "Bunny" Davis, 594 
W. Lexington, Danville; Joe Jones, Manchester Sales 
& Service, Manchester; Raymond Ricketts, Jenkins; 
Howard Wiley, Paintsville; Ernie Ohattin, Y. M. C. A., 
Ashland. 

Girls' Track Events 

Action by the Board of Control has caused some 
changes in the Girls' Track events which were listed 
in the September issue of the ATHLETE. The list of 
events is now as follows: 50 Yd. Hurdles, 880 Yard 
Run, 50 Yd. Dash, 440 Yd. Run, 100 Yd. Dash. 220 
Yd. Dash, 70 Yd. Hurdles, 440 Yd. Relay, 880 Yd. Med- 
ley Relay, Shot Put, Discus, High Jump, Long Jump, 
Standing Broad Jump, Softball Throw. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Friday morn- 
ing March 18, 1966. The meeting was called 
to order by President Foster J. Sanders at 
9:15, with all Board members and Commis- 
sioner Theo. A. Sanford present. The invoca- 
tion was given by Don R. Rawlings. 

Ralph C, Dorsey moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that the reading of the minutes 
of the January 29th meeting be waived since 
the members of the Board had received 
copies of the minutes. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that Ralph 
C. Dorsey and Foster J. Sanders had been 
re-elected to Board membership in Sections 
3 and 4 respectively, without opposition, for 
a four-year period beginning July 1. 1966. 

After a general discussion of Board of 
Control proposals, Don Davis moved, second- 
ed by Don R. Rawlings, that the following 
proposals shall be presented to the Delegate 
Assembly, after which the motion was car- 
ried unanimously: 

PROPOSAL I — The Board of Control 
proposes that By-Law 29, Section 1, be 
amended to read as follows: "Anv person 
who officiates in a football, basketball or 
baseball game between member schools of 
the Association must be registered with the 
Commissioner and must have his official 
card indicating retristration." 

PROPOSAL TI _ The Board of Control 
proposes a new Bv-Law to read as follows: 
"No more than eight teams may be entered 
in a countv. conference or invitational 
baske+hall tournament." 

PROPOSAL TTT — The Board of Control 
pro'^osps a new Bv-Law to read as follows: 
"A team may enter onlv one countv. confer- 
ence or invitational tournament during the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



Page Three 



CENTRAL CITY— SEMI-FINALIST 
1966 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mike Venerable, Ralph Mayes, Rodney Kirtley, Billy 
Pendley, David James. Second Row: Rocky Todd, Billy Kirkpatrick, Jeffrey Jones, 
Mack Dykes, Jimmy Burney. Third Row: Coach Jack Day, Kenny Lindsay, James 
Alexander, Mgr. Buddy Collier, Ass't. Coach Wayne Devine. 



regular basketball season." 

PROPOSAL IV— The Board of Control 
proposes that By-Law 6, Section 3, be 
amended by substituting "for thirty-six 
school weeks" for "during the first semes- 
ter." 

" PROPOSAL V — The Board of Control 
proposes that Article IV-3-d-9 of the Consti- 
tution be amended to read as follows : "Have 
authority to set the fees for officials in dis- 
trict and regional basketball tournaments." 

PROPOSAL VI — The Board of Control 
proposes a new By-Law to read as follows: 
"Attendance by a first team or a reserve 
team player at a football or basketball camp 
or instructional clinic conducted away from 
the school's regular practice or playing field 
is prohibited. Attendance at such a camp 
and/or instructional clinic s^hall cause the 
player to lose Ihis eligibility." 

Upon recommendation of the Commis- 
sioner, Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Morton Combs, that the WO yard hurdles 
event in Girls' Track be changed to 70 yard 
hurdles. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that all bills of the Association 



beginning -January 1, 1966, and ending Feb- 
ruary 28, 1966, be allowed. The motion vas 
carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, '.he 
meeting adjourned. 

Registered Baseball Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A. - 1965-66 

(List compiled April 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Callis, Herbert D.. 1646 17th Street, Bowling Green, S12-2348, 

842-2226 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, 451-8218, 7-8862 
Chesney, Orville, Lot #46, Post Trailer Court, Ft. Campbell, 

798-3348. 798-5914 
Cline, Roy E., 1194 Lincoln, Louisville. 037-8249 
Collins. C. E.. 6 Gino Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-0154, 798- 

4404 
Crawford. Ray. 110 West Rosewood, Clarksville, Indiana, WH 

4-9831 
Davis, Bunny, 594 W. Lexington St.. Danville, 236-2606, 236- 

2606 
Davis. Curtis, 1119 E. Burnett. Louisville. 634-4959, JU 2-3511 
Emery. George A., 234 Clay. New Albany, Indiana. WH 4- 

5257. BU 3-3511 ext. 242 
Eyl. E. W.. Jr.. 2262 Bradford Drive, Louisville 
Fort, John W.. Austin Peay St. College, Clarksville, Tenn., 

646-2565. 798-4919 
Frankel. Louis S.. 3723 Stanton Blvd., Box 40220. Louisville, 

464-6519. 454-6619 
Gour, Bob. 218 South Lee St., Bowling Green, 843-9582, 745- 

4293 
Heitlinger. Lester, 3647 Johnston Way, Louisville, TW 3-3401, 

459-3699 



Page Foui- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



Henderson, Hugli, 3014 Colonial Hill, Louisville, 458-7116, 

969-3111 
Herndon, Howard Eugene, Jr., Route #1. Wingo, 376-2916 
Hollowav, Robert G.. Ill L Depot. Batesville, Ind., 934-2156 
Hubbs. Cletus L.. 319 South Main, Eminence, 845-7111, 845- 

4071 
Johnson, Robert L.. 6 Jamestown Place, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-3982, Fort Campbell 4012 
Jones, Joe S., 203 Green St., Manchester. 598-3793, 598-2129 
Kasperski, Harry W., 652 South Floyd St., Apt. 381, Louisville 
Kaufman. Alvin R.. 8215 St. Anthony Church Rd., Louisville, 

366-0126, 687-0871 
Kavs. Allie, Grandview, Shelb>Tille 
Keith. Theodore H.. 13405 Lidcomb. Valley Station, 937-7930, 

635-5211 
Kidwell, James, 1112 Parkway. Covington, 581-9141 
Kimmel. Jeri-y, Beechmont. 476-2656 
King. James A., 5000 Clarmar Rd., Jeffersontown, 239-8015, 

776-2466 
Kloufetos, Spiro J.. 2702 Pioneer Rd., Louisville, 447-0373, 682- 

5610 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Lane, London, 864-6235,, 864-6240 
Lambert, Irvin, 6110 Rural Way. Louisville, 969-4718, 458-1948 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde, Louisville, 895-8731 
Mattingly, Charles, 3813 Poplar Level Rd., Louisville, 459- 

Pardue, Israel L.. 1005 South 28th St., Louisville, 722-2488 
Penner, Merritt D., Jr., Route #4, Box 739, Manchester, 698- 

3711 
Salyer, Henry E., 4829 Bluebird, Louisville, 969-6371, 778-2731 

ext. 456 
Smith, Wyatt Jack, 203 Ohio St., Somerset, 679-1211 
Stephenson, Harry. 1612 Hawthorne, Lexington 
Thornton, Daniel A., B Co., 801st, Fort Campbell, 647-2234, 

768-4012 
Tomerlin. Allen John. 3251 Poplar View Drive, Louisville, 

447-4861 
Varble, William E., 1705 Cypress St., Louisville, 775-6712, 772- 

3621 
Wiley. Howard E., 616 Frank St., Paintsville. 789-5546, 789- 

6336 
Winfrey, Shelby, 315 Sharon Drive. Campbellsville 
Wingfield, Felix G., 1132 Eastern Parkway, Louisville 



1966 ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
entered in a countj', conference or invitational basltet- 
ball tournament." 

PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control proposes a new By-Law t» 
read as follows: "A team may enter only one county, 
conference or invitational tournament during the reg- 
ular basketball season." 

PROPOSAL IV 

The Board of Control proposes that By-Law 6, 
Section 3, be amended by substituting "for thirty-six 
school weeks" for "during the first semester." 

PROPOSAL V 

The Board of Control proposes that Article IV- 
3-d-9 of the Constitution be amended to read as fol- 
lows: "Have authority to set the fees for officials in 
district and regional basketball tournaments." 

PROPOSAL VI 

The Board of Control proposes a new By-Law to 
read as follows: "Attendance by a first team or a 
reserve team player at a football or basketball camp 
or instructional clinic conducted away from the school's 
regular practice or playing field is prohibited. Atten- 
dance at such camp and /or instructional clinic shall 
cause the player to lose his eligibility." 

PROPOSAL VII 

Prin. H. D. Puckett (Munfordville) proposes that 
the following be added to By-Law 28, Section 5: "Prior 
to the opening of regular season play, a basketball 
team may have only two practice games with players 
other than members of the squad." 



AAHPER News 

The average 12-year-old boy today is 
stronger, faster, more agile, better coordi- 
nated, and has more bodily efficiency and 
endurance than his 19-year^ld brother had 
at the same age. So is the average 12-year- 
old girl. 

And because of this, the physical stand- 
ards they must meet in the school gym 
classes have been raised. 

Today's typical 12-year-old boy has lop- 
ped .2 seconds off the 50-yard dash; has 
added 10 feet to the softball throw ; has add- 
ed 5 inches to the broad jump; and can do 
19 more sit-ups than his brother could at the 
same age. 

In a test given last year to 9,000 boys 
and girls in 49 states — the children ranged 
in age from 10 througih 17 years old — phy- 
sical performance was found to be signifi- 
cantly higher than it was in the 1957-58 
school year, when similar tests were given. 
Every age group performed better on every 
test item than their older brothers and sis- 
ters had. 

The new national norms for physical 
fitness were published today by the Ameri- 
can Association for Health, Physical Educa- 
tion, and Recreation, a department of the 
National Education Association. Dr. Carl A. 
Troester, Jr., executive secretary of 
AAHPER, explains what's happened : 

"There are many reasons for the up- 
ward swing in the physical performance of 
boys and girls now in school. Nearly half 
the states have strengthened their physical 
education requirements in the last few years 
with an increasing emphasis on physical 
education in the elementary schools. 

"Parents, teachers, administrators, and 
medical personnel are increasingly convinced 
of the need for daily programs of physical 
activity, both in and out of school. And along 
with these new opportunities for boys and 
girls there has been a sharp increase in the 
number of physical education teachers em- 
ployed." 

The 1957-58 tests were conducted by 
AAHPER. The 1964-65 tests were conducted 
by the University of Michigan supported by 
funds from the cooperative Research Pro- 
gram of the U. S. Office of Education. The 
director of both projects was Dr. Paul A. 
Hunsicker, professor of education at the Uni- 
versity. 

Dr. Hunsicker explains the increase in 
physical fitness this way : "The physical per- 
formance of practicallv anv group of school 
children can be improved by increasing the 
physical and physiological demands on their 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



Page Fi\'e 



bodies. This has been demonstrated since 
time immemorial. The point which has been 
overlooked is sensitizing the pupil to the 
need for maintaining a high level of health 
throughout life. This objective can best be 
achieved through quality programs of health 
and physical education." 

Under the new norms, the average 12- 
year-old boy is expected to do 3 pull-ups 
instead of 2; 50 sit-ups instead of 31; broad 
jump 51/2 feet instead of barely over 5 feet; 
run the 50-yard dash in 7.8 seconds instead 
of 8 seconds; throw a Softball 120 feet in- 
stead of 110 feet; take a 120 foot shuttle-run 
in 11 seconds flat instead of 11.4 seconds; 
and cover 600 yards by a combination of 
running and walking in 2 minutes 21 seconds 
instead of 2 minutes 39 seconds. 

NEW AAHPER FITNESS TEST MANUAL 

68 pp. (242-07270) $1.00 

Discount: 2-9 copies, 10% ; 10 or more, 20% 
Payment must accompany all orders of $2.00 

or less 
Order from: NEA Publications-Sales, 1201 

■Sixteenth Street, N. W., Washington, 

D.C. 

1966 Track Questions 

Editor's Note: These interpretations of the Na- 
tional Alliance Track and Field Rules do not set aside 
nor modify any rule. The rulinas are made by the 
National Federation of State Hiqh School Athletic 
Associations in response to situations presented. 

1. Situation: (a) The pole vaulting pit; or (b) the 
high jumping pit is filled with sand. 

RuUng: In (a) sand is not legal. This pit may be 
filled with sawdust, wood shavings, or other soft ma- 
terial, such as an adequate thickness of resilient foam 
rubber or plastic foam. In (b) sand is not illegal. 
However, it is no longer considered a suitable ma- 
terial. 

2. Situation: In the third line of the first para- 
graph on page 22 of the Track and Field Rules and 
Records Book, there is a reference to his "third 
opportunity." Is this correct or should the reference 
be to his "second opportunity"? 

Ruling: The statement is correct. In the cited case, 
the competitor had his first opportunity at six feet. He 
passed his second, thereby making a succeeding op- 
portunity the third. 

3. Situation: For what purpose do the track rules 
permit a shot putter or a discus thrower to touch the 
inside of the ring provided he does not step on top 
of it? 

Ruling: There was a time when the rules for this 
were indifinite and, in fact, they were not the same 
for the two events concerned. When a chalk mark or 
a painted line is used for the ring, it is majidatory 
for the competitor to stay inside the chalk or paint 
mark. However, the inside edge of such mark often 
becomes ragged. It is not meant that a comoetitor 
be unduly handicapped because of such ragged edge. 
When there is a raised metal ring, it is common 
procedure for a contestant to rest the side of his foot 
against the inner edge of the ring so as to be sure 
of obtaining maximum distance for his approach. The 



present coverage permits this. 

4. Situation: In the one-mile run, competitor Al 
has drawn a lane far from the pole. He requests to be 
allowed to start behind a runner nearer to the pole. 

Ruling: This is sometimes done in the longer runs. 
However, no competitor may voluntarily change his 
lane. He must have the consent of the referee or clerk 
of the course to do so. 

5. Situation: Runners Al and A2 have drawn for 
their lanes and they wish to exchange. 

Ruling: The exchange of lanes is not permissible 
since the drawings were made by individuals. They 
must start in the lanes which they drew, unless 
shifted to vacant lanes by order of the referee. When 
any school has more than one competitor in a race, 
it is best to draw by schools and alternate teammates 
with the opponents. 

6. Situation: During a meet, inspectors stationed 
on a turn have been called over to the finish line to 
help judge the result of a race. During this race 
there is a running infraction committed by a con- 
testant at a turn vacated by the inspectors. The referee 
and one or two other officials can plainly see the 
foul when it occurs. 

Ruling: The referee, above all other officials, is 
responsible for being certain that fair competition for 
all contestants must prevail. He is responsible for dis- 
quahfying those whose acts infringe upon the rules of 
fair competition. He must take such action and make 
such decisions which do ensure each contestant a fair 
and equal opportunity to do his best. In the above 
situation it would be the duty of the referee to dis- 
qualify the offender. He has the authority to do so. 

7. Situation: Can points be scored in the pre- 
liminaries? 

Ruling: No points are scored in the preliminaries 
of running events, or in the pole vault or high jump. 
It is possible to score points in the preliminaries in 
the running long jump, triple jump, and weight events. 
A competitor's best distance is credited to him in the 
the running long jump, triple jump or weight events, 
whether this distance is achieved m the preliminaries 
or in the final. 

8. Situation: Al, in taking his starting position, 
has his hand on the stai'ting line. 

RuUng: The rules provide that no part of a com- 
petitor's body shall touch the ground on or in front 
of the starting mark before the pistol shot. Many 
track atliletes do not understand this and sometimes 
violate the rules by placing the hand or hands on or 
slightly ahead of the starting line, rhe hands and 
feet may be placed on the ground up to the starting 
line but never on the ground which is on or beyond the 
starting line. The rules do no* nrohibit a lean-over, 
in fact, this is a permissive technique in the start. 

9. Situation: In the one-mile run Al swings and 
sways from one side of track to the other. 

Ruling: In a race involving a curve and where 
lanes are not specified, a runner may change toward 
the inside or outside when he is at least one full 
running stride (approximately 7 feet) an advance of 
any runner's path he crosses. 

10. Situation: Al is first to breast the tape, but 
Bl running faster at liie finish line is first to break 
the tape. 

Ruling: Al is the winner. The tape or the yam 
is used for the purpose of aiding the judges and at 
no time is a race to be decided by the act of breaking 
it. Runners should be placed in the order in which any 
part of their bodies ttorso), as distinguished from ihe 
arms, feet or hands, reaches the finish line. The 

'Continued on Page Ten) 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 

The 1966 Kentucky State High School Basketball 
Tournament must go into the records as outstandir^. 
When the police of Louisville and Jefferson County told 
the Dutchman that this was the best behaved group 
of youngsters in attendance that they have seen in 
many years, a great tribute was paid tiie State of Ken- 
tucky and their parents. 

Ernie Chattin, AsJiland, who has been in attendance 
at the Kentucky State Tournament for 45 consecutive 
years in the capacity of a player, coach and spectator, 
praised the conduct of the young sports fans as well as 
that of the crowd in general. In the Dutchman's opinion 
the officiating at this school boy classic was outstanding 
and not enough can be said for the efficiency and cour- 
age of the eight men who blew the whistles a;t the 
meet. 

The sportsmanship of the coaches and the players 
reached a new high. It took courage, fair play and 
manhood for Coach John Rendek, who lost a heart- 
breaker in the finals, to msike the statement, "The 
officiating was good." In a close contest a coach cam 
always find something to quarrel with if he wants to, 
but John Rendek set an example which causes the 
Flying Dutchman to bestow on him the Com Cob Pipe 
of Honor for the month of March. The citation reads, 
"Presented to Coach John Rendek for exemplary con- 
duct." 

Each year the crowds in attendance at the big 
school boy tournament show an improved knowledge of 
the game and consequently display finer sportsman- 
ship. This year's crowds were courteous to the officials, 
cheered good plays of opponents and, in general, made 
one feel glad that aU this was happening in Kentucky. 

The State Tournament Hospitality Committee com- 
posed of LouisviUe and Jefferson County citizens did 
everything possible to prove to visiting Kentuckians 
that the big metropolitan area wants them here and 
will do everything possible to make things pleasant. 
The Dutchman served as Chairman of this committee 
and can report that the recreation center in the west 
wing of Freedom Hall was used by hundreds of boys 
and girls between game sessions, the Hospitality Room 
was filled to overflowing, the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association Officials were rendered every 
service possible, and no stone was left unturned to 
keep the visiting students off the streets after the 
games were over. 

On Thursday and Friday nights dances were held 
in the Convention Center from 10:30 P.M. to 1:00 A.M. 
with two aims. The first was to provide w^holesome 
recreation under supervision for the visiting students, 
and the second was to keep them off the streets where 
they would not be supervised. It is interesting to note 
that 1,374 students attended the teen dance on Thurs- 
day night and 1,639 were there on Friday night, making 
a total of 3,013 youngsters who were under careful 
supervision during the troublesome hours. The only 
means the State Hospitality Committee has of financing 
the big hospitaUty program is from receipts from the 
dances for Which an admission of $1.00 per couple or 
$1.00 stag was charged. These receipts amoimted to 
$2,34S which will defray all expenses with a shght 
overage. 

One of the outstanding events of the spring 
athletic season is the naming of the Game 
Guy of the Year. Back in 1949 Bobby Kirch- 
dorfer was the first Game Guy of Kentucky, 
with the parade of Game Guys continuing to 1966 when 
Jim McKnight of Raceland won the honors. The best 
way to inform Kentuckians about scrappy Jim Mc- 
Knight is to present an article from the Ashland Daily 




Jim McKnight 

Independent of November 14, 1965, written by David 
Reed. This follows. 

"Playing football is the goal of many boys in high 
school. They look forward to running the winniraig 
touchdown or making the tackle that keeps the team 
from losing the game. For Jim McKnight of Racelemd 
the goal of playing football was not just a goal but a 
real challenge. 

"Jim didn't become the local hero. He never ran a 
touchdown, nor did he make a tackle. Jim just played 
football, but for Jim it was a real accomplishment. 
Jim McKnight has had but one leg since he was ten 
days old. 

"The 16-year old junior at Raceland High School 
went out for the sport last spring during conditioning 
drills. It was the first time he had tried any sport. The 
days were hot and the practices long, but Jim McKnight 
stayed with the team. 

"This fall before school began, Jim McKnight was 
practicing football again. He could have been fishing, 
swimming, or doing anything else. No one would have 
said anything to him, but Jim practiced football with 
the team. Some boys quit the team — not Jim McKnight, 
he wanted to play quarterback. 

"Jim didn't make the first or even the second 
string, but Jim was playing football. He saw 'his first 
action in varsity play against Wurtland when the 
Ramblers had a comfortable lead. He knew the costly 
artificial leg was not covered by the school insurance 
policy, but he played just the same. 

"Jim threw a pass that fell short. It would have 
been a touchdown aerial if caught. The next play v/as 
the same thing, a pass, but again it fell short. Then 
on the next play, the ball went past Jim. He would 
have to pick up the ball and run. A one-legged runner 
doesn't stand much of a chance. 

"Jim McKnight's only effort in a varsity game 
wasn't the greatest in the world to say the least. He 
lost a total of 12 yards, but this hasn't caused Jim to 
give up the idea of playing football. Jim says he enjoys 
football because he "likes to 'hit and get hit in a 
game." "Football is the greatest sport I know," adds 
the scrappy youngster. 

"Jim win be back next year playing the gridiron 
sport for the Ramblers. He knows he wiU never be a 
great player, but Jim McKnight will always be a 
real sport, in one sense of the word, just for trying to 
play." 

Each year since 1953 the Jefferson County Youth 
Association has named a Mr. Recreation of Kentucky 
based on outstanding unselfish sservices of various 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APPOL, 1966 



Page Nine 



1966 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Number of Games Covered: 15 

Average Score: For Winners, 74; For Losers, 63; Total Both, 137 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls per game: 

By Winning Team: 14 By Losing Team: 16 Both Teams 30 per game 

Average No. Free Throw Attempts (P & T.) 43 Successful 65.3% 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. : (a) Common fouls committed by a player while he or a 

teammate was in control: .90 per game 

Average No.: (b) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 7.4 per game 

Average No.: (c) Times dribbler committed foul: .73 per game 

Average No.: (d) Violation along free throw lane during 

administration of free throw by Team A: .06 per game 

by Team B: per game 

Average No.: (e) Times substitutions were made during game: 11.1 i)er game 

Average No.: (f) Times substitutes entered after a violation: .73 per game 

Average No.: (g) Time-outs charged to winning team: 2.20 per game 

Average No.: (b) Time-outs charged to losing team: 3.60 per game 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

1. Total Number of Games Covered by this report: 15 

2. Average elapsed time per game (from first jump. to game end) was 1 hour 13 minutes 

Total Per Game 

3. Personal Fouls : (Average number of times per game) : 

a. Fouls resulting from screening situations: 31.3 

1. Foul by player who is doing the screening (offense) .53 

2. Foul by player who is being screened (defense) .67 

b. Personal Intentional fouls 

1. By Offense 

2. By Defense .20 

4. Technical fouls: 

a. Delay of Game 

b. Excess Time-Out 

c. Unsportsmanlike tactics by player on court .06 

d. Unsportsmanlike tactics by bench personnel .06 

5. Player disqualified (Average number of times per game) : 1.06 

MISCELLANEOUS DATA 

1. Total number of games covered by this report: 15 

2. Held balls declared as result of a closely guarded player in front court 
holding and/or dribbling ball for 5 seconds: 3 

3. Time-out requested by coaches for purpose of conferring with official 

regarding correcting or preventing error: 

4. Insufficient Action warnings given: 

5. Insufficient Action technical fouls assessed: 

6. Personal Fouls along lane during free throws: 18 



Kentuckians to the promotion of wholesome recreation. 
Max Sanders, Valley Station, was the first Mr. Recre- 
ation of Kentucky in the year of 1953. Other Mr. Recre- 
ations of Kentucky are: 1954, Dan Campbell, Lebanon; 
1955, Buss Kirchdorfer, Shively; 1956, Lawrence 
Wetherby, Anchorage; 1957, Dr. James T. Fuller, 
Mayfield; 1958, C. W. Lampkin, Bowling Green; 1959, 
B. C. Van Arsdale, Lyndon; 1960, Joe Mitchell, Padu- 
cah; 1961, Henry Ward, Frankfort; 1962, Ted Sanford, 



Lexington; 1963, Willie Dawahare, Ha2ard; 1964, Mar- 
low W. Cook, St. Mathews; 1965, Ernie Chattin, 
A^and. 

Raymond H. Wimberg has been named by the 
Youth Association as Mr. Recreation of Kentucky of 
1966. Everybody in attendance at the State Tournament 
saw this gentleman in action along press row, doing 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



TRACK QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page Five) 
finish is not decided by the position of the head, 
neck, arms, feet or hands. The runner can best pro- 
tect himself by cultivating a finish form that calls 
for an extended chest when he breasts the tape. 

11. Situation: Vaulter Al clears a given height 
while vaulting and wearing gloves. Coach of opponent 
requests referee to rule whether gloves are permissible. 

Ruling: This question often is raised and there 
are a few who believe that gloves might be classified 
as an artificial aid. The wearing of gloves is not 
interpreted to be an advantage. The Rules Committee 
has traditionally ruled that the use of gloves is per- 
mitted in the pole vault. 

12. Situation: Runner Al is passed by Bl who 
accidentally cut in too close and causes Al to break 
his stride. May Bl be eliminated for his accidental 
act? 

Ruling: Yes. An interfering runner shall be dis- 
qualified unless it is obvious tliat his foul was due to 
a foul by a third nmner. Runners should learn to 
run with their arms and shoulders to the side and 
ahead of their bodies instead of swinging them wildly 
back and forth laterally, where they may strike a 
competitor. Runners should always remember that 
the lead runner has the right-of-way and that they can 
take it from him only by passing in compliance with 
the provisions of Rule 7 which provide that a passing 
runner must be one full running stride (approximately 
seven feet) in advance of the runner whose path he 
crosses. 

13. Situation: During the run preceding the throwing 
of the javelin, the thrower approaches the scratch 
line from an angle. His throw is from behind the 
scratch line. 

Ruling: Legal. There is no provision requiring 
the thrower to approach perpendicularly to the 
scratch line. 

14. Situation: Al takes a position on his mark 
when instructed to do so by the starter. Al does not 
alter his position when the starter commands "set." 
Starter, in conformance with the rule, fires the 
pistol and Al is left in his blocks. 

Ruling: Legal start. Al may or may not take a 
position at the start customarily used by a competitor 
in a dash race. The situation does not indicate nor 
imply that Al was in motion or over the line when 
the pistol was fired and, therefore, there was no 
violation. 

Comment: It is considered an excellent procedure 
for the starter to e-xolain the commands and me- 
chanics of starting to the competitors before a heat 
of any race is run. However, the starter is not obli- 
gated to do this, and under no condition may he 
coach the competitors. 

15. Situation: In a relay, runner Al passes the 
baton to runner A2 and only one-half of the baton is 
within the exchange zone when the pass is completed. 

Ruling: This is a violation. The exchange rule re- 
quires that only the baton must be within the zone 
when the exctemge is made. This is interpreted to be 
the entire baton. 

16. Situation: Does an inspector have the authority 
to disqualify a runner for committing a rules in- 
fraction? 

Ruling: No. Inspectors are required to report 
directly and immediately to the head inspector and 
the referee following any race during which they 
observe an infraction or irregulartiy. An inspector 
who observes such irregularity or infraction, such as 
illegal crowding or running on or over the left line 
of a runner's lane, or committing infractions of the 



hurdle or relay rules, is required immediately signal 
by the waving of a red flag over his head. After 
receiving the report of the inspector, the referee will 
make whatever decision is deemed necessary. 

17. Situation: In a meet, five or more teams are 
entered but one or more teams withdraw from the 
relay race, or there are only three entries in the 
race. Should the race be scored as for a triangular 
meet (if only three compete) or as for a quadrangular 
meet (if only four compete)? 

Ruling: Regardless of the number of teams which 
might be entered in any one event, this meet is 
neither a triangular meet nor a quadrangular meet. 
Consequently, places should be scored in accordance 
with the official scoring table for a multiple meet. If 
five teams were entered in the meet and only three 
competed in the relay event, scoring for the relay 
would be 6-4-3. 



1966 Baseball Questions 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These interpretations of the 1966 
National Alliance Baseball Rules do not set aside nor 
modify any rule. The rulings are made and published 
by the National Federation of State High School Athlet- 
ic Associations in response to situations presented. 

1. Play: Following a charged time-out granted to 
the defensive team, Fl assumes a position, without 
the ball, on or near the pitching plate. All bases are 
occupied. Rl steps off 3rd and is immediately tagged 
with the ball by F5 who has concealed it since the 
player conference. 

Ruling: Rl is not out. The ball has not become 
alive following the charged conference. The only way 
it may become alive is for the pitcher to have it in 
his possession, and take a position on the pitcher's 
plate. Ilhe umpire then beckons and calls "play ball." 
Neither is it possible for the pitcher to commit a balk 
whUe the ball is dead. It is recommended that the 
umpire order F5 to throw the ball to Fl in the above 
situation, since no play can result when the badl is 
dead. By taking this action, he prevents a delay of 
game. 

2. Play: Rl, R2 and R3 are on 3rd, 2nd and 1st 
bases, respectively, with a count of ball 3, strike 2 on 
B6. B6 swings at ne.xt pitch, and misses the ball which 
gets by the catcher and lodges in mask of the umpire. 

Ruling: Ball becomes immediately dead. B6 and 
Eill base runners are advanced one base each. 
aU bases runners are advanced one base each. 

3. Play: The situation is the same as Play 2 except 
ball lodges in the m^ask of F2 rather than umpire's. 

Ruling: Ball remains alive. It would be permissible 
for F2 to remove his mask to prove his possession of 
the ball and step on home base for a force-out of Rl. 

4. Play: With 2 out and Rl on 1st, B4 hits next 
pitch for an inside the park home run. In circling the 
bases, B4 misses 2nd. Defensive team returns the ball 
to infield and F4 calls for it, steps on 2nd base and 
appeals the infraction of B4 to base umpire. 

Ruling: B4 is out and run of Rl counts. Had the 
infraction been the missing of 1st and ithe appeal was 
allowed, B4 would be out and run by Rl would be 
cancelled. 

5. Play: Rl is on 3rd and R2 on 1st with none out. 
Fl assumes a set stance on the pitcher's plate. As he 
sfretches, R2 advances toward 2nd base. Fl realizes 
the advance is occurring but he does not throw to 2nd, 
fearing that Rl would break for home and score. Fl 
completes his stretch, coming to a pause with the ball 
in both hands in front of his body. R2 reaches 2nd and 
rounds it, after which Fl delivers ball to B3 who fouls 
pitch into stands. 

RuHng R2 is ordered to remain on 2nd. He was 
there prior to the time of the pitch. The definition of 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



Page Eleven 



"time of the pitch" determines which base Rl is 
entitled to. 

6. Play: With one out and Rl on 2nd and R2 on 
1st, B4 hits fair line drive to right field. Rl breaks 
for 3rd but collides with the shortstop who is standing 
in the base line and Rl falls to the ground. He regains 
his feet and reaches 3rd. R2, who was on 1st, has not 
stopped ctnd advances to 3rd. F5 receives ball and 
tags R2 while both Rl and R2 are on 3rd. B4 advances 
to 2nd. 

Ruling: Rl and R2 are awarded home and 3rd 
bases, respectively, and B4 remains on 2nd. 

7. Play: With no one on base, Fl assumes a set 
position on pitcher's plate. After taking a stretch, he 
brings arms down in front of his body with his hands 
on ball. Without pausing for one full second, he de- 
livers and pitch is in the strike zone. Bl does not 
strike at it. 

Ruling: This is an illegal pitch, the penalty for 
which is a ball. 

Comment: This is necessary so that the pitcher 
does not take advantage of the batter. When the pit- 
cher is in the windup position, he is facing the batter 
and the ball is in fuU view of the hitter. However, 
when a pitcher is using the set position, he is standing 
sideways or at right angles to the batter, and the ball 
is completely hidden from the batter. To be fair to both 
batter cind base runner, the rules specifically require 
the pitcher, when in the set position, to pause for one 
fuU second with the ball in both hands in front of his 
body prior to delivery. If he does not, it is treated as 
an illegal pitch, which is called a ball when there are 
no runners, unless the batter should advance at least 
a minimum of one base on tiie result of the pitch. 
When there is a runner(s), it is a balk. 

8. Play: With Rl on 2nd and two out, B4 hits triple 
and Rl advances to home on the play. B4, in advcinc- 
ing to 3rd, misses both 1st and 2nd. After Fl is on 
pitcher's plate, F6 at 2nd base, calls for ball. Befuddled 
Fl commits a balk in attempting to throw him the 
ball. Umpire orders B4 home from 3rd. After ball is 
properly made alive, Fl steps clearly backward with 
pivot foot from pitcher's plate and throws ball to F6 
who tags 2nd base and appeals infraction to umpire. 

RuHng: B4's run is cancelled. B4 is declared out. 
Run by Rl counts. Had the appeal been made at 1st 
base, no runs would have scored. 

9. Play: With Rl on 3rd, Fl assumes the set posi- 
tion on pitcher's plate with ball resting in both hands 
in front of his body. Rl takes a big lead off 3rd and Fl 
steps toward 3rd, separates his hands and feints a 
throw in that direction. Rl breaks for home and Fl, 
who has only feinted a throw to 3rd, draws his non- 
pivot foot back to its original position and steps to- 
ward home base and delivers pitch. At no time did he 
step off the pitcher's plate with his pivot foot until he 
delivered the ball. 

Ruling: Balk. After feinting the throw to 3rd, Fl 
would have had to replace both hands on the ball in 
front of his body and come to a pause for a period of 
at least one full second before delivering the ball to 
the batter. 

10. Play: Bl is at bat without a head protector. 
This is not discovered until: (a) he has Wt ball over 
fence for a home run; or (b) he has hit a triple. The 
discovery is made while Bl is running the bases. 

Ruling: In (a), Bl is not out and the nan counts. 
In (b), after Bl has reached 3rd and the play is com- 
pleted, if the failure to wear a head protector is noted 
by the umpire, or called to his attention by the officisd 
scorekeeper, or coach or player of the opposing team, 
Bl is then declared out. 

11. Play: Coach of defensive team requests and is 
granted time by the umpire-in-chief. He then asks Ihe 



umpire to substitute his relief pitcher (SI) for his 
starting pitcher (Fl). Coach then: (a) confers with SI 
while the latter is walking to the mound; or (b) dis- 
cusses the situation with SI while SI is taking his five 
warm-up throws; or (c) shouts directions from the 
bench to SI, who is on the mound warming up; or (d) 
has a conference with F4 and F6 on field while SI is 
taking warm-up throws. 

Ruling: Defensive team is charged with a confer- 
ence in all situations above except (c) where coach is 
merely calling out instructions from players' bench, 
such as "pitch carefully to him." In (c), the coaoh is 
not on the field delaying the game. 

12. Play: While Bl is in the batting circle, the 
umpire notices he is not wearing a head protector. 

Ruling: Bl may not be called out until he has 
stepped into the batter's bo.x and the ball has become 
alive. When this happens, the umpire wiU immediately 
declare time and call offender out. A player does not 
become a batter until he enters the batter's box and 
the ball is alive. 

13. Play: Bl: (a) starts a swing at a pitch but 
attempts to hold back on it; or (b) appears as though 
he is attempting to bunt the ball. In either case, Bl 
misses the ball. How does umpire determine what to 
call the pitch? 

Ruling: The call requires good judgment on the 
part of the umpire. The call is based entirely upon 
judgment, and therefore, guidehnes are necessary in 
making the decision. The principle frequently used with 
success is: If a batter swings halfway or more, it is 
a strike. In other words, if the bat is swung so it is in 
front of the batter's body or ahead of it, it is 
a strike. The breaking of the wrists has, in the past, 
sometimes been used as a guide but the above guide 
is more positive and, therefore, recommended. In bunt- 
ing, any movement of the bat toward the ball when the 
badl is over or near the plate area is a strike. 

14. Play: Rl is on 1st when B2 hits safely to right 
field. Rl misses 2nd and, as he starts for 3rd, F9 over- 
throws 3rd. The ball goes into dugout. B2 had crossed 
1st before ball left the hand of F9. Can Rl be put out 
on appeal for missing 2nd? 

Ruling: Yes. The procedure is as follows. Award 
home base to Rl and 3rd to B2. After the ball becomes 
alive, and prior to time of the next pitch, the team in 
the field should properly appeal to umpire that Rl 
missed 2nd. Umpire would then declare Rl out and 
cancel his nm. Rl missed 2nd during a live ball and 
it was not one of his awarded bases. No appeal could 
have been allowed had 2nd been one of the awarded 
bases. 

Comment: 8-2-1-Note has far-reaching application 
for base nmning and the awarding of bases. When a 
base runner passes a base without touching it, and the 
ball is alive, he is considered to have touched that base 
when awards are made due to the ball becoming dead. 
The runner still is subject to an appeal prior to the 
time of the 1st pitch after the ball becomes ahve, pro- 
vided the missed base is not one which he is awarded 
for the overthrown ball becoming dead. The only ex- 
ception to this statement is in cases where awards 
are necessary when a batted or thrown ball, as indi- 
cated in 8-3-2-b and c, is touched by detached player 
equipment thrown, tossed, kicked or held by a fielder. 

15. Play: Rl is on 1st with none out. B2 hits to 
centerfield where F8 throws glove at ball and hits it: 
(a) before Rl passes 2nd; or (b) after Rl passes 2nd 
but fails to touch it (base). 

Ruling: If B2 reaches at least 3rd base, then in 
both (a) and (b), Rl scores. However, in (b), Rl stiU 
would be subject to appeal at 2nd base until the time 
of the next pitch. If B2 only reaches 2nd, then, in both 
(a) and (b), Rl and B2 would be awarded home and 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1966 



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3rd, respectively, and no appeal would be possible 
since the award was from home for B2 and from 1st 
for Rl. In (a), B2 made three bases so the penalty is 
ignored and Rl is on his own. In (b), B2 did not make 
at least three bases, therefore, the umpire declares the 
ball dead and awards the bases to the runners. No ap- 
peal is allowed. 

16. Play: With Rl on 3rd and two out, improper 
batter B5 appears at bat. During pitcher's windup, Rl 
breaks for home base and beats the pitch there. He is 
called safe by the umpire. Pitch is not strike three nor 
ball four. Team in the field then realizes that B5 is an 
improper batter and calls it to the attention of the 
umpire. 

Ruling; The umpire shall call proper batter B4 out 
for B5's infraction. The run scored by Rl counts. The 
activity of improper batter B5 did not assist nor ad- 
vance Rl. The advance was made on his own merit. 
Of course, if the pitch to improper batter B5 had been 
strike three and the catcher either caught the ball or 
threw out B5 before he reached 1st base, then Rl's 
run would not count. 

17. Play: With Rl and R2 on 2nd and 1st, respec- 
tively, B3 bunts ball toward 1st. F3 fields it on fair 
ground near the base line and is prepare to tag B3, 
who stops and back pedals toward home. 

Ruling: This Is a legal act, unless B3 goes back to 
home and either touches or crosses it. Only then 
would B3 be ruled out for running bases in reverse 
order. 

18. Play: With Rl on 1st, Fl stands astride the 
pitcher's plate with ball in his hand at his side while 
taking the signal from ir2. He suddenly wheels and 
throws or feints throw to 2nd, which Rl is attempting 
to steal. 

Ruling: Legal. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Nine) 

everything he could to help in that area as well as 
working in the Hospitality Room, circulating in the 
stan<te, and in general living up to his name of Louis- 
vUle's Ambassador of Goodwill. Ray Wimberg is the 
first Louisvillan ever to win this coveted award and 
he is richly deserving. Every big sports promotion 
which comes to the Falls City area wiU have this 
chap as a spark plug. Most wholesome sports or recre- 
ational events anywhere in Louisville or Indiana owe 
much to this energetic hard-working Ambassador of 
Goodwill. On the State Tournament Hospitality Com- 
mittee it was Wimberg again, playing a major role. 
Sports writers in this area wiU tell you that they get 
telephone calls from Mr. Recreation of Kentucky in 
the wee hours of the morning when Ray gets an idea 
and wants them to publicize it. A fellow Mke Ray 
Wimberg comes "down the pike" once in a lifetime 
and Louisville and Jefferson County are fortunate that 
the road brought him to Derbytown. 

The events and accomplishments the Dutchman has 
recorded in this column and others belong to history, 
and the record of high school sports in Kentucky is 
indeed enviable. We must remember that we can't 
live forever on what we did yesterday so here's the 
Dutchman's closing thought: 

"Yesterday belongs to history, 
Tomorrow belongs to God, 
Today, and only today, is yours." 
— Selected 



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78 Super K — Another popular Item; a practice ball of excellent quality. Each $ 5.80 

562 — Rubber ball, favored by grade schools; sturdy and dependable $ 4.30 

Basketball Goals — 

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338 H — Outdoor practice goal. Equally satisfactory for Indoor use. Pair with nets $ 2.95 

Horse Shoes — 

No. HS — Regulation siie and weight; Craftsman brand; drop forged. Pair _ $ 2.10 

No. P — Regulation pitching stakes for playing horse shoes. Price per pair $ 2.25 

Shuffleboard Sets — 

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894 — Official set with 8 wooden discs and four wood cues. Set $ 7.00 

Volleyballs — 

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Soft Balls and Bats — 

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Hiqh School AthMe 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION-1966 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mark Englert, Bill LaMasters, Bill Francis, Frank Pontrich, 
Robert Kunz. Second Row: Bert Ross, Mike Mullins, Tim Queenan, Steve Blume, Jim 
Tougher. Third Row: Dennis Abell, Robert Yann, Michael O'Connor, Paul Schultz, John 
Hannon. Fourth Row: Bill Kleir, Edward Struss, Mike Kelly, Mike Heineman, Robert 
Godecker. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

May, 1966 



WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION— 1966 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Nancy Younkin, Pat Safriet, Debbie Brown, Barbara Applegate, Eileen Grosse, 
Lissy Henderson, Marilyn Blaske. Cookie Gutermuth. LaDeanna Richardson. Second Row: Jeanne Hill, Marcy 
Carpenter, Harriet Freitag, Marilyn Mazey, Libby Swope. Sally Lawrence. Janice Mazey. Kathy Shroeder, 
Alice Wright, Maurene Welsh, Barbie Barrows, Pam Henderson, Nancy Curtis, Kristi Dix, Debbie Scott, Pam 
Phoenix. Bara Wymond, Starr Sprigg. Third Row: Nancy Cousins, Jan Crosby. Bonny Stark, Pris Chamberlin, 
Mona Redmon, Coach Greg Bobrow. 

HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION— 1966 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Hewling, Gray, S. Klausing. Gross, M. Klausing, Leak, Sparks. Second Row: Ader, 
Artopous, Reed, Gelke, Gabbard, Starring, Snyder. Third Row: Coach Stivers, Berniadini, Stivers, Stress, Reed. 
Ney, Meyer, Grimm. Fourth Row: Kyle, Huheey, Grovcr, Kiel. Cecil. Jones, Partin. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVIII — NO. 10 



MAY, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The forty-ninth annual meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association was held at the Ken- 
tucky Hotel, Louisville, on Thursday afternoon, April 
14, 1966. 

President Foster J. Sanders called the meeting to 
order at 3:00, and asked the Commissioner to call the 
roU. Fifty-eight regularly elected delegates or alter- 
nates answered the roll call. 

W. P. Wheeler moved, seconded by James Pursi- 
fuU, ithat the minutes of the 1965 meeting of the As- 
sembly, which had been sent previously to all member 
schools, be approved without being read. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report on the 
activities of the Association during the 1965-66 school 
year (The report of the Commissioner appears else- 
where in this issue of the magazine). 

The Commissioner, at the request of President 
Sanders, then explained the Board of Control proposals 
to the Delegate Assembly. 

President Sanders stated that consideration of the 
proposals was the next order of business. 

OrvUle B. Hayes moved, seconded by Lee Mills, 
that Proposal I, providing that registration with the 
K.H.S.A.A. be required of baseball officials calling 
Association games, be adopted. The motion carried by 
a vote of 31-25, but President Sanders stated that the 
proposal had not carried by the necessary two-thirds 
vote in order for it to become a part of Asssociation 
regulations. 

Lawrence Burdon moved, seconded by W. P. 
Wheeler, that Proposal II, providing that no more than 
eight teams may be entered in a county, conference, 
or invitational basketball tournament, be tabled. The 
motion to table carried by a vote of 35-14. 

Robert B. Turner moved, seconded by James T. 
Dotson, that Proposal III, providing that a team may 
enter only one county, conference, or invitational tour- 
nament during a regular season be tabled. The motion 
motion to table carried by a vote of 35-14. 

Roy Reynolds moved, seconded by Arthur J. 
Walsh, that Proposal IV, providing that By-Law 6, 
Section 3, be amended by substituting "for thirty-six 
school weeks" for "during the first semester," be 
adopted. The motion carried by a vote of 40-16, which 
was more than the necessary two-thirds majority. 

Roy T. Reasor moved, seconded by Denzil Halbert, 
that Proposal V, providing that the Board of Control 
have authority to set the fees for officials in both 
district £ind regional basketball tournaments, be tabled. 
The motion to table carried by a vote of 36-16. 

James Pursifull moved, seconded by Fred Murray, 
that Proposal VI, relating to attendance of players at 
football or basketball camps be adopted. The motion 
failed to carry by a vote of 24-33. 

Roy T. Reasor moved, seconded by Aaron Turner, 
that Proposal VII, providing that, prior to the opening 
of regular season play, a basketball team may have 
only two practice games with players other than mem- 
bers of the squad, be adopted. The motion carried by 



a vote of 43-12, which was more than the necessary 
two-thirds majority. 

The Commissioner introduced to the Delegate As- 
sembly Ralph C. Dorsey and Foster J. Sanders, re- 
cently re-elected to Board of Control membership lor a 
period of four years. 

There being no further business, President Sanders 
declared the meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the Association was held in 
the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M., 
with 630 delegates and other school officials present. 

Presentation of the Cavana Swimming Award to 
Prin. Harold Miller of the Highlands High School, 
which had won the 1965-66 award, was made by the 
Commissioner. 

Recipient of the Game Guy Award was Jim Mc- 
Knight of the Raceland High School. The presentation 
of the award was made by K.H.S.A.A. Director Oran C. 
Teater. 

The address of the evening was given by Dr. Irvin 
E. Lunger, President of Transylvania College, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky. The subject of Dr. Lunger's address 
was "The Play Maker." Dr. Lunger's talk was both 
inspiring and challenging. 



1965-66 ANNUAL REPORT 
(Presented io Delegate Assembly) 

Three hundred eighty-two schools joined the 
Association during 1965-66. This is thirteen less than 
the number of schools enrolled in 1964-65. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional 
basketball tournaments amounted to $131,799.43. Re- 
ceipts from the sixty-two district basketball tourna- 
ments amounted to $225,698.62. Receipts from ticket 
sales at the State Basketball Tournament, including 
state tax, will approximate $168,000.00. Profit to the 
Association on the tournament will be close to $127,- 
000.00. A complete record of all receipts and 
disbursements will appear in a subsequent issue of the 
Association magazine. 

Thirteen hundred sixty-seven basketball officials 
and 565 football officials registered with the Associa- 
tion in 1965-66. Ten football rules clinics were held 
under the direction of Edgar McNabb and one hundred 
forty-one football officials took the National Federation 
examination for the higher ratings. Of this number, 
nine were added to the Certified hst, and there were 
seventy-nine officials on the Approved hst. Charlie 
Vettiner, conducted fifteen basketball clinics, and held 
the School for Basketball Officials. Harry Stephenson 
conducted a school for baseball officials, who are being 
registered for the first time during the current season. 
Regional representatives in the three sports mentioned 
continue to render a fine service to the officials and 
schools in their respective areas. One hundred sixty- 
three officials took the National Federation basketball 
examination with twenty-four being added to the Certi- 
fied list and sixty-nine receiving the Approved rating. 

Two member schools have been suspended from 

{Continued on Page Seven) 



Page T\vc 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



MAY, 1966 



VOL. xxvni — NO. 10 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville 

Vice-President Preston Holland (196.';-69), Murray 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Don Davis 
(1963-67). .independence; Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse 
Cave: Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68). Paintsville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

^lotn the L^omynlsslonei s Dfflce 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1965-66 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Fines for Late Reports 

PrincipaLs of more than 100 schools hacJ not fileci 
their repoi:ts on basketball officials and /or their bas- 
ketball participation (eligibility) lists for the 1965-66 
season when this issue of the ATHLETE went to press. 
Some 400 basketball officials have not filed their 
reports on member schools. The Board of Control has 
established a fine of $.5.00 for both schools and officials 
deluMjuent with their reports. A deadline of June 15 
has been set for the filing of all reports recjuired under 
association rules. Officials who have not worked any 
games should notify the K.H.S.A.A. office accordingly. 
Such notification is considered a report. 

Attention, Principals! 

Approximately 100 principals of K.H.S.A.A. mem- 
ber schools have not as yet filed requests this school 
year for their insurance subsidies. If the school is 
underwriting all or part of insurance protection for its 
athletes, the Board of Control will allow a maximum 
credit or refund of $40.00 to each school for "all sports 
except football." and an additional credit or refund of 
$60.00 to each school maintaining a football team. Prin- 
cipals of schools which qualify for the credit or refund 
should write for reimbursement forms at once. 



Tournament Receipts 

The receipts from the district, regional and state 
basketball tournaments for 1966 were less than those 
of the preceding year, according to the reports of the 
tournament managers. In 1965 the gross receipts of 
the district tournaments were $244,711.02 as compared 
to $225,698.62 for 1966. The decrease in regional tourna- 
ment receipts was from $185,104.01 to $131,799.43, for 
an average of approximately $3,300 for each of the 
sixteen tournaments. Proceeds from the State Tourna- 
ment were down approximately $20,000. 

The decrease in gross regional tournament receipts 
would affect greatly the amount schools involved would 
receive as their shares of the profit. Since the ex- 
penses of conducting the tournaments were approxi- 
mately the same as 1965 expenses, any decrease in 
receipts would be most noticable in the amount each 
school received this year. It is possible that the tele- 



vising of other basketball games at the same time 
was largely responsible for the decreased tourna- 
ment receipts. 

Summer Camps 

One of the proposals presented to the 1966 Delegate 
Assembly .of the K.H.S.A.A. by the Board of Control 
failed to pass. The proposal provided that attendance 
by a first team or resei-ve team player at a football 
or basketball camp or instructional clinic conducted 
away from the school's regular practice or playing 
field is prohibited. However, the attention of principals 
and athletic directors is called to the fact that present 
regulations. Board of Control policy, and rules in- 
terpretations by the Commissioner make attendance 
at specialized clinics and football camps (conducted 
jointly by two or more member schools) somewhat 
dangerous on the part of the individuaul athlete who 
attends such clinics and camps. The danger refers to 
possible loss of eligibility. 

No specialized clinic has the sanction of the K.H. 
S.A.A. If two players from the same school attending 
the clinic found themselves in a scrimmage or practice 
game at the clinic on the same team, the Commis- 
sioner would rule, as he has done on similar cases in 
the past, that these players have taken part in non- 
sanctioned post-season athletic contest, and that they 
have therefore lost their eligibility for the forthcoming 
season. 

School administrators and coaches sending their 
football squads to camps conducted jointly with one or 
more schools being involved run the risk of violating 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 28-5, which provides that prior to 
the football season a team may have only two scrim- 
mages or practice games with players other than 
members of the squad. The Commissioner has ruled 
that the conducting of drills on football fundamentals 
between two or more members of each of two ditferent 
squads is to be considered a scrimmage, with respect 
to the provisions of By-Law 28-5. Because of the pos- 
sible loss of player eligibility and the school's violation 
of the rule mentioned, the Board of Control and the 
Commissioner will not give their sanction to jointly 
conducted football camps. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Friday morning, April 15, 196(5. The meeting 
was called to order by President Foster J. Sanders, 
with all Board members. Commissioner Theo. A. San- 
ford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield pres- 
ent. The invocation was given by Preston Holland. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the reading of the minutes of the March 18th 
meeting be waived since members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report on the state 
basketball tournament receipts and expenses. He stated 
that total ticket sales, as reported to the Delegate 
Assembly, would approximate $168,000.00, with antici- 
pated profits to the Association of $127,000.00. 

There was a discussion of possible re-districting 
effecting basketball Regions 3 and 5. The Commissioner 
presented letters from eight principals of the two dis- 
tricts involved in the proposed redistricting. Five prin- 
cipals were in favor of the change, two were not 
opposed, and one was not in favor of the change. After 
a general discussion of the requests for re-districiting, 
Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that Meade County schools be moved from Basketball 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



Page Thi-ee 



1966 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, February 25-26, 1966 
TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AAA" BOYS 



TEAM 



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St. Xavier 

Westport 

Trinity 

Atherton 

Covington Catholic 

Waggener 

Henry Clay 

Paducah Tilghman 
Newport Catholic . 
Lafayette ......... 

Bryan Station .... 

Paul G. Blazer ... 
Bowling Green . . . 

Fern Creek ... 

Seneca ............ 



5 


10 


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8 


7 


14 





6 


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1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Jim Hartye, Trinity 1:52.9 

2. Trinity 1 :47.2 

3. Robert Yann, St. Xavier 1:53.4 

4. Covington Catholic 1:50.7 

5. Atherton 1:55.4 

6. Henry Clay 1:57.1 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Jim Hartye, Trinity 1:52.9 

2. • John Nolan, Athei-ton 1 :53.4 

3. Robert Yann, St. Xavier 1:53.4 

4. Mike Pocock, Westport 1:54.2 

5. M. Kries, Westport 2:02.1 

6. Paul Daniels, Trinity 2:05.4 

Hartye set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 1 :52.9. 

3. SO Yard Freestyle— 

1. Ed Struss, St. Xavier :23.1 

2. Danny Neal, Atherton :23.7 

3. Mike Smith, Westport :24.1 

4. Bill Handleman, St. Xavier — :24.2 

5. Barry Pfanstiel, Tilghman :24.8 

6. Merrill Moter, Atherton :25.1 

4. 200 Yard Individual Medley— 

1. Pete Schuler, St. Xavier 2:08.1 

2. Bill Pocock, Westport 2:08.5 

3. Martin Kute, St. Xavier 2:10.7 

4. Dennis Pursley, Trinity 2:12.8 

5. Scott Wright, Trinity 2:15.8 

6. Greg Hutt, Westport 2:28.8 

Schaler set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 2 :08.1. 



5. Fancy Diving — 



Tony Rueff, St. Xavier 

2. Kenny VonRoenn, Atherton 

3. Mike Smith. Westport 

4. Dan Watson, Westport 

5. Dean Wilkinson, St. Xavier - 

6. Bob Sandford, Lafayette 

6. 109 Yard Bufterfly— 

1. John Geiser, Waggener 

2. Robert Yann. St. Xavier 

3. Jim Hartye, Trinity 

4. Greg Marquis, Gov. Catholic _ 

5. Mike Pocock, Westport 

6. Richard Goff, Newport Cath. 
Geiser set a new state record 

event with his time of :56.4. 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Ed Struss, St. Xavier 

2. Frank Hartye, Trinity 

3. Steve Warren, Westport 

4. Merrill Moter. Atherton 

5. C. Skinner, Westport 

6. Lari-y Ebersold, Trinity 

Struss set a new state record 

event with his time of :49.4. 

8. 100 Yard Backstroke— 

1. Bill Pocock, Westport 

2. John Geiser, Waggener 

3. Scott Wright, Trinity 

4. Will Fulton, Atherton 

5. Dave Gold, Westport 

6. Richard Goff, Newport Cath. 



__412.10 
._365.70 
._320.00 
._297.85 
._275.20 
__245.05 

.. :56.4 
__ :57.4 
._ :57.3 
.- :69.5 
-1:00.6 
_1 :09.4 
in this 



:49.4 
:49.7 
:53.5 
:53.7 
:54.2 
:54.7 
this 



_ :58.3 
. :59.3 
.1:01.6 
_1:02.1 
-1:02.4 
_1:04.3 



Pocock set a new .state record in this 
event with his time of :58.3. 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Frank Hartve, Trinity 4:02.3 

2. .Tohn Nolan, Atherton 4:04.4 

3. Martin Kute, St. Xavier 4:15.0 

4. Martin Kries, Westport 4:16.0 

5. Dave Guenther, 

Covington Cath. 4:31.1 

6. Paul Daniels, Trinity 4:33.4 

Hartye set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 4:02.3. 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

1. Dennis Pursley, Trinity 1 :a4.4 

2. Pete Schuler, St. Xavier 1:05.5 

0. Ted Schroder, 

Covington Cath. 1:07.6 

4. Greg Hutt, Westport 1:07.9 

5. Steve Warren. Westport 1:08.5 

6. Mike Koors, Covington Cath. -.1:11.1 
In a preliminary heat Pursley set a 

new state record in this event wtih his 
time of 1:03.1. 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Trinity 3:29.9 

2. St. Xavier 3:30.7 

3. Westport 3:24.2 

4. Atherton 3:35.5 

5. Covington Cath. 3:50.5 

6. Henry Clay 3:53.0 

Trinity set a new state record in this 

event with the time uf 3:29.9. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, February 25-26, 1966 



TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AAA" GIRLS 











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Henry Oay, 


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Paul G. Blazer .... 


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5 


Pleasure Ridge Park 








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21/2 


Brjan Station 




























































































Bowling Green 


















































1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Westport 2:03.8 

2. Sacred Heart 2:15.7 

3. Atherton 2:16.0 

4. Henry Clay 2:16.0 

5. Notre Dame 2:20.5 

6. Seneca 2:21.7 

Westport set a new state record in this 

event with the time of 2:03.8. 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Jean Jarreli, Sacred Heart 2:13.1 

2. Margie Goodwin, Sacred Heart 2:17.8 

3. Sandra Harper, Henry Clay _. -2:18.8 

4. Debbie Horton. Sacred Heart ..2:19.6 

5. Jeanne Hill, Westport 2:21.2 

6. Denise Showalter, Westport __-2:22.2 

3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Lissy Henderson, Westport :26.8 

2. Beth Sawyer, Seneca :27.3 

3. Judith Saalfield. Notre Dame — :27.9 

4. Starr Sprigg, Westport :28.0 

5. Tassie Bolton, Henry Clay :28.2 

5. Helen Waddell, 

Pleasure Ridge :28.2 

4. 200 Yard Individual Medley— 

1. Sally Lawrence, Westport 2:27.5 

2. Pam Henderson, Westport 2:32.2 

3. Kendall Kessinger, 

Henry Clay 2:34.2 

4. Marilyn Blaske, Westport 2:35.9 

5. Alice Wright. Westport 2:38.3 

6. Helen Waddell. 

Pleasure Ridge 2:40.2 

Lawrence set a new state record in 
this event with her time of 2:27.5. 



. Fancy Diving — 

. Barby Barrows, Westport 260.35 

Margaret McDonald, 

Waggener 357.75 

. Debbie Brown, Westport 348.15 

. Pris Chamberlain, Westport ...262.90 
. Bennie Besten. Henry Clay ...241.25 
. Mary Peake, Sacred Heart 220.05 

. 100 Yard Butterfly— 

. Pam Henderson. Westport 1 :05.7 

. Sally Lawrence Westport 1 :09.0 

Kendall Kessinger, 

Henry Clay 1:09.6 

. Kathy Struss, Sacred Heart —.1:10.4 
. Karen Hennessey. Athei-ton 1:10.3 

LaDeanna Richardson, 

Westport 1 :11.9 

In a preliminary heat Henderson set a 
ew state record in this event with her 
ime of 1:05.3. 

. 100 Ya-d Freestyle— 

. Lissy Henderson, Westport :59.8 

. Margie Goodwin, 

Sacred Heart 1:00.9 

. Jean Jarreli, Sacred Heart ___1 :01.3 

. Beth Sawyer, Seneca 1:02.0 

. Debby Wagner, Sacred Heart -_1 :06.3 

. Mona Redmon, Westport 1:05.5 

, 100 Yard Backstroke— 

. Tassie Bolton, Henry Clay 1:07.5 

Marilyn Blaske, Westport 1:08.1 

. Starr Sprigg. Westport 1:10.4 

Denise Showalter, 

Westport 1 :13.8 

Laura Grueneisen, 

Sacred Heart 1:19.2 



6. Janet Hartman, Paul G. 

Blazer 1 :19.9 

Bolton set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 1 ;07.5. 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Debbie Horton 

Sacred Heart 4:57.5 

2. Sandra Harper. Henry Clay _. -5:01.5 

3. Jeanne Hill, Westport 5:05.9 

4. Shelly Benn, Atherton 6:17.4 

6. Ann Meyer, 

Paul G. Blazer 5:25.8 

6. Laura Grueneisen, 

Sacred Heart 5:32.9 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

1. Alice Wright, Westport 1 :14.2 

2. LeDeanna Richardson, 

Westport 1 :15.3 

3. Ruth Jarreli, 

Sacred Heart 1 :23.4 

4. Carolyn Cornish, Henry Clay .1:25.2 

5. Monty Black, Paul G. 

Blazer 1 :27.4 

6. Bonny Stark. Westport 1 :30.0 

Wright set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 1:14.2. 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Westport 4:08.7 

2. Sacred Heart 4:09.8 

3. Henry Clay 4:10.1 

4. Atherton 4:29.7 

5. Notre Dame 4:35.7 

6. Paul G. Blazer 4:56.3 

Westport set a new state record in 

this event with the time of 4 :08.7. 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



Page Five 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, March 25-26, 1966 
TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AA" BOYS 



TEAM 


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Lexington Catholic 











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Frankfort 











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Shelbyville 





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Beechwood 


4 
































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3 














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2 














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1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Highlands (Racke, Wilson, 

Grimm, Reik) 1:54.9 

2. Louisville Cty. Day (Leather- 
man, Hardy, Blaske, 

Segerberg) 1 :57.5 

3. Fort Knox tBieschke, Schefke, 
Cachet, Dalusky) 2:07.0 

4. Hopkinsville ( Boxley, Thorpe, 

Cayce, Higgins) 2:10.2 

5. Beechwood (Hughes, Mann 
Castleman, Jackson) 2 :11.6 

6. Good Shepherd (Hancock, 

Ramsey, Snelling, Mucci) 2 :35.5 

Highlands set a new state record in 
this event with the time of 1:54.9. 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Lee Bezold, Highlands 1:54.3 

2. Thomas LeVasseur, Ft. Knox __2:12.2 

3. Bill Smith, Shelbyville 2:19.0 

4. Tom Bowne, Breckinridge 

Trg. 2 :24.5 

5. David Ramsey, Good 

Shepherd 2 :24.9 

6. Bob Cuzick, Ft. Knox 2:27.1 

Bezold set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 1 :54.3. 

3. 50 Yard Freestyfe— 

1. Jim Ramsey Good Shepherd :24.3 

2. Granville Cayce, Hopkinsville :25.0 

3. Tom Reik, Highlands :25.6 

4. Ken Grimm, Highlands :26.0 

5. Tim Fosdick, Highlands :26.0 

6. Ken Leatherman, Lou. 

Cty. Day :26.2 



Ramsey set a new state record in this 
event with his time of :24.3. 

4. 200 Yard Individual Medley— 

1. Pat Quinn, Lexington Cath. ___2:16.1 

2. Mark Blaske, Louisville 

Cty. Day 2:19.6 

3. Jim Ware, Dixie Heights 2:21.5 

4. Mike Page, Ft. Knox 2:27.8 

5. Harry Thompson. Frankfort —2 :29.5 

6. Claude Wilson, Highlands 2:31.0 

Quinn set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 2:16.1. 

5. Fancy Diving — 

1. Jeff Tull, Hopkinsville 246.65 

2. Joe Chase, Ft. Knox 214.40 

3. Mike Rice, Highlands 204.30 

4. Kenny LeVasseur, Ft. Knox ___197.90 

5. Mark Lukens, Highlands 197.76 

6. Grant Hays, Shelbyville 186.90 

6. 100 Yard Butterfly— 

1. Lee Bezold, Highlands :56.1 

2. Ken Battle, Murray 1:01.0 

3. Steve Ramsey, Good Shepherd _1:04.1 

4. Steve Scharstein, Highlands ..1:12.4 

5. Ken Grimm, Highlands 1:12.8 

6. Adrian Hobley, Ft. Knox 1:15.8 

In a preliminary heat Bezold set a 
new state record in this event with his 
time of :55.8. 



7. 100 Yard Freestyle 



Jim Ramsey, Good Shepherd 
Tom LeVasseur. Ft. Knox . 
Marshall Hardy, 

Louisville Cty. Day 

Dan Jervis, Founciation 

Jake Thornbury, Bourbon Co 
T. Bowne, 
Breckinridge Trg. 



1:03.3 



ord 



8. 100 Yard Backstroke— 

1. Jim Ware, Dixie Heights 1 :00.8 

2. Pat Quinn, Lexington Cath. ...1:02.5 
:!. Mark Blaske, Lou, Cty. Day ..1:04.2 

4. Tim Racke. Highlands 1:10.9 

5. Tommy Dorrah, Hopkinsville 1:13.5 

6. Todd Hume, Model 1:17.9 

Ware set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 1 :00.8. 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Mike Page. Ft. Knox 4:34.7 

2. Steve Ramsey, Good 

Shepherd 4 :38.2 

3. Ken Battle, Murray 4:48.5 

4. Eussell Page. Ft. Knox 5:01.9 

5. Bill Smith, Shelbyville 5:06.5 

G. Bob Cuzick, Ft. Knox 5:10.5 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

Claude Wilson, Highlands 1:07.6 

Hank Thompson. Frankfort „_1 :12.3 1. 

Butch Phister, Highlands 1 :14.8 

LariT Schafke. Ft. Knox 1:16.8 , 

Mac Kennedy, Highlands 1:17.3 

Tom Grimm, Highlands 1:18.1 

Wilson set a new state record in this 3. 

ent with his time of 1 :07.6. 



11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay- 



Highlands (Reik, Jones, 

Fosdick, Bezold) 3:65.0 

Fort Knox (Cechet. Dalusky, 

Page, LeVasseur) 4:05.7 



Hopkinsville (Higgins, Dalton, 

B. Cayce. G. Cayce) 4:16.2 

Good Shepherd (S. Ramsey, 

Hanley, Snelling, J. Ramsey) ..4:23.3 

Dixie Heights (Newman, 

Beckert, Blaine, Ware) 4:24.6 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, March 25-26, 1966 







TEAM SCORING 


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1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Highlands (Jones, D. Reed, 

Drake, lUausing) 2:17.1 

2. Villa Madonna (Schroder, 
Hurrmann, K. Rettig, 

J. Rettig) 2:22.5 

3. Model (Stoll. Hounchell, 
Wimberly, Wiggins) 2:28.4 

4. Beechwood (S. Ziedler. PendeiT, 

P. Ziedler, Crouch I 2:32.6 

5. Hopkinsville (Wiggins, Shep- 
herd, Rogers. Primrose) 2:32.7 

6. Shelbvville (Whitaker, Lewis, 

Smith. Shannon! 2:35.1 

2. ?m YaH F-<^'»vle— 

1. Janet Kiel. Highllands 2:33.0 

2. Janet Bock, Model 2:46.0 

3. Nancy Bernardini, Highlands -.2:46.7 

4. Lucy Cecil. Highlands 2:46.7 

6. Maureen Quinn, Ft. Knox 2:60.5 

6. Sharon Gibson. Bourbon Co. -..2:58.1 

3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Debbie Reed. Highlands :27.3 

2. Susan Klausing. Highlands ... :29.5 

3. Martine Springate. Lex. Cath. . :30.0 

4. Judy VanMeter, Hopkinsville -. :30.0 
6. Ellen Schroder. Villa 

Madonna :31.4 

6. Anne Kittrell, Ft. Knox :31.6 

In a preliminary heat Reed set a new 
state record in this event with her time 
of :27.1. 

4. 200 Yard lndividu=il Medley— 

1. Jill Stivers. Highlands 2:43.9 

2. Donna Reed. Highlands 2:46.5 

5. Cissy Gibson, Bourbon Co. 2:54.4 



4. Bobbie Roose, Ft. Knox 2:57.3 

5. Sally Zeidler, Beechwood 3:10.6 

6. Susan Wimberly, Model 3:10.9 

In a preliminary heat Stivers set a 

new state record in this event with her 
time of 2:40.6. 

5. Fancy Diving — 

1. Mary Jane Stross, Highlands ..262.95 

2. Susanne Higgins, Hopkinsville .225.00 

3. Sue Ann Hounchell. Model 215.40 

4. Becky Snider, Hopkinsville 214.70 

5. Patty Meyer. Highlands 206.65 

6. Betsy Eddy, Highlands 199.00 

6. 109 Yard Butterfly— 

1. Anne Battle, Murray 1:14.7 

2. Nancy Vetter, Villa Madonna .-1 :18.3 

3. Susan Klausing. Highlands 1 :19.9 

4. Adrienne Huheey. Highlands —1 :28.9 

5. Peggy Zeidler. Beechwood 1 :29.9 

6. Sharon Gibson, Bourbon Co. .-1:39.7 

7. lOI Ya-H Freei'yie— 

1. Debbie Reed, Highlands 1 :03.6 

2. Janet Kiel. Highlands 1 :06.9 

3. Nancy Vetter, Villa Madonna —1 :08.7 

4. Martina Springate, Lex. Cath. -1 :09.1 

5. Judy VanMeter, Hopkinsville —1 :11.6 

6. Ginny Grimm. Highlands 1:13.8 

In a preliminary heat Reed set a new 

state record in this event with her time 

of 1:02.6. 

8. 100 Yard Backstroke— 

1. Nancy Jones, Highlands 1 :14.7 

2. Sally Zeidler, Beechwood 1 :17.5 

3. Jane Scheper, Villa Madonna —1 :20.9 

4. Anne Battle. Murray 1:20.9 

5. Kathy Stoll. Model 1:23.5 



6. Lucy Cecil. Highlands 1 :27.1 

9. 4M Yqrd Freestyle— 

1. Jill Stivers, Highlands 5:28.5 

2. Cissy Gibson, Bourbon Co. 5 :41.6 

3. Janet Bock, Model 5:59.9 

4. Nancy Bernardini, Highlands -.6:06.2 

5. Maureen Quinn. Ft. Knox 6:07.7 

6. Susan Wimberly, Model 6:17.1 

In a preliminary heat Stivers set a 

new state record in this event with her 
time of 5:12.2. 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

1. Donna Reed, Highlands 1:20.1 

2. Jane Scheper, Villa Madonna .1:21.3 

3. Kathy Rettig, Villa Madonna -.1 :25.0 

4. Bobbie Roose, Ft. Knox 1:25.6 

5. Bethany Grover, Highlands ...1:26.7 

6. Julie Rettig. Villa Madonna 1:35.5 

Reed set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 1 :20.1. 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Highlands (Kiel, Jones, 

Stivers, Reed) 4:19.3 

2. Villa Madonna (Lamever, Sch- 
roder. Scheper, Veeler) 4:50.8 

3. Frankfort (L. Williams, K. 
Williams, Breathitt, 

Thompson) 4 :47.9 

4. Ft. Knox (Dalusky. Little, 
LaVasseur, Roose) 4:58.9 

5. Hopkinsville (Higgins, Wiggins, 
Primrose, Van Meter) 4:69.7 

6. Beechwood (Kimmerle, Hani- 
fin, Darenkamp, Crouch) 5:10.8 

Highlands set a new state record in 
this event with the time of 4:19.3. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



Page Seven 



ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Page One) 

the Association during the current school year. The 
two schools were considered guilty of violating 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, the Association's Sportsmanship 
Rule. 

The number of schools maintaining football in 1965- 
66 increased from 161 to 173. The numbers of schools 
maintaining the other sports sponsored by the 
K.H.S.A.A. show no appreciable change from the pre- 
ceding year with the exception of baseball Which in- 
creased from 306 to 317, boys' track from 216 to 2K, 
boys' golf from 119 to 126, and boys' tennis from 69 to 
79. There are 89 schools this year which have teams in 
girls' track. The Association is sponsoring this sport 
officially for the first time. The numbers of teams in 
other sports are: cross country, 94; wrestling, 18; boys' 
swimming, 28; girls' swimming, 24; girls' golf, 22; 
girls' tennis, 49; and rifle marksmanship, 14. 

Fifty-three member schools of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association have made contributions to 
the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Thir- 
ty-eight of this number have made contributions of 
$100.00 each, or have made pledges for this amount. 
■The National Hall of Fame Committee has asked the 
K.H:S.A.A. to set a goal of $100.00 for each of its 
member schools, and this goal has been accepted. The 
Board of Control has directed the Commissioner to 
solicit Association member schools in an effort to meet 
the goal mentioned. Anything that members of this 
Delegate Assembly can do in their respective districts 
to assist the administrators and coaches in meeting 
the goal wUl be appreciated very much. 

Your continued cooperation, assistance, and con- 
structive criticism are solicited. 



K. H. S. C. A. 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING 

Room 104, Convention Center, Louisville, Kentucky 
April 14, 1966 

The regular annual meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association was called to order by 
Coach Tommy Long of Allen County. 

Special guests recognized were Don Shelton, Mur- 
ray College; James Feix, Western Kentucky; and 
sports writer. Bob White, of the Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 

Special attention was given to the clinics for high 
school coadies, which are to be held August 5 and 6 in 
Lexington. These cUnics are held in conjunction with 
the All-Star football and basketball games sponsored 
by the Association. The basketball session is to be held 
on Friday afternoon with the following three coaches 
participating: Jack Sutherland, Harrison County; BUI 
Harrell, coach of the State Tournament Champions, 
Shelby County Rockets; and Jim Richards of Glasgow. 

The football cUnic is to be held on Saturday 
morning August 6 with three coaches heading the 
program. They are: Ron Cain of Seneca, Fleming 
Thornton of Hopkinsville, and Walt Green of Middles- 
boro. 

A financial report of the accounts of the All-Star, 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association, and the 
Building and Loan Account was presented to the mem- 
bers by treasurer Joe Ohr. On motion by John 



Snowden, Woodford County, and seconded by EstiU 
Branham, Warren County, the treasurer's report was 
accepted. 

As the minutes of the Executive Board and the 
regular meetings are published in the Athlete, official 
pubhcation of the Kentucky High School Athletic Asso- 
ciation, it was moved that the reading of the minutes 
to the assembly be omitted. 

The feature speaker of the meeting was John 
Oldham, basketball coach of Western Kentucky Univer- 
sity "HiUtoppers". Oldham told several amusing stories 
concerning his experiences in recruiting and several 
concerning Mr. Ed Diddle, basketball coach emeritus 
of the Western HUltoppers. 

Coach Oldham gave a short review of the Michi- 
gan games, which was lost in the final seconds on a 
"bad call" — as Oldham said. He also discussed the 
prospects for 1967. After a couple of remarks regard- 
ing the misquotes used by some newspaper writers he 
praised the University of Kentucky Wildcats for their 
record. 

Coach Oldham listed ten values a participant cam 
receive from athletics. He said that athletics develops 
physical power, develops himself to group discipline, 
develops self confidence, develops Ufe long friendships, 
develops travel opportunities, develops perserverance, 
develops proper conduct, develops team work, develops 
obedience to authority, develops sportsmanship. 

Coach Charlie Kuhn (Male), coach of the year in 
football for 1964 and the retiring president of the Ken- 
tucky High School Coaches Association, recognized 
Fleming Thornton (Hopkinsville) as the "Coach of the 
Year" for 1965 and presented him a full sized inscribed 
football trophy in recognition of his being elected to 
this honor. 

President James BazzeU presented Bill HarreU 
Shelby County) a full sized basketball trophy in recog- 
nition of his being elected "Coach of the Year" for 
1966. This marks the first time that a coadh has been 
so recognized, in that Harrell received the same honor 
for 1965. Harrell's Shelby County team won the State 
Basketball Tourney and was ranked as number one 
team in the State of Kentucky. 

In the election of officers for the year 1967-68, on 
motion by Snowden (Woodford County) and seconded 
by Branham (Warren County) the secretary-treasurer 
position was given to Joe Ohr for the eleventh time. 

Fleming Thornton, Charlie Bentley and "Butch" 
Gilbert were nominated for Sgt.-at-Arms. A committee 
of Doc Adams, Jim Kennedy, Denzil Holbert and Jarvis 
Parsley was appointed by President BazzeU to count 
the votes cast for the position. Coach "Butch" Gilbert 
of Glasgow was elected. 

While the votes were being counted Mr. Arnold 
Levitz explained to the members the conditions of the 
insurance policy available to all Kentucky coaches. 

The representative of the Coaches Association was 
instructed how to vote on the proposals to be presented 
at the delegate assembly. Ohr was also presented two 
proposals to offer from the fioor. Denzil Holbert pro- 
posed that the Board of Control membership be in- 
creased from eight to sixteen — the association 
approved the proposal. The second proposal, offered by 
Corky Cox and passed by the coaches, stated that a 
coach's membership card shall be honored at all ath- 
letic contests played under Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association sanction, with the exception of 
the State Basketball Tournament. 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 

As the Dutchman pens his last column 
of the 1965-1966 sports season, he joins 
other Kentuckians in their acclaim of the 
dedicated K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control, the 
professional staff and the hundreds of volun- 
teers whose combined efforts brought an 
adequate and wholesome program of sports 
to boys and girls all over Kentucky. It takes 
leadership to inspire sports lovers, the length 
and breadth of the Commonwealth, to be 
eager to cooperate with the Commissioner's 
office, give many free services, time and ef- 
fort to make each year's K.H.S.A.A. program 
surpass the preceding one. The Dutchman 
applauds that leadership. 

Among those Kentuckians, whose strong 
support of wholesome athletic activities for 
young men and women has meant much to 
this Board of Control and those preceding it, 
is Murray's Eli Alexander. Eli is this 
month's choice for the Com Cob Pipe of 
Honor award. Now principal of Murray High 
School, Eli Alexander's philosophy was in- 
fluenced early in life by the K.H.S.A.A. 
sports program as he developed into one of 
Murray High's finest athletes, starring in 
football, basketball and track. Eli's Christian 
leadership of young people won this recogni- 
tion for him. 

It would be interesting to make a study 
to determine how many men in high posi- 
tions are there today because of the lessons 
learned on the gridiron, hardwood, diamond, 
or in other sports when just bovs. After all, 
life is just a game and is different only from 
football and other sports in that it is a more 
serious competition with the ability to make 
decisions more important because the end 
results are success and failure, happiness 
and unhappiness. The ability to make deci- 
sions under pressure can best be gained in 
STX)rts — and it appears that our really big 
decisions of the future must be made under 
pressure. That's why every boy or girl 
should associate himself or herself with 
competition. 

What will your community do to pro- 
vide wholesome comiietition during the sum- 
mer months when schools are not in session? 
The energies of youth will not take a vaca- 
tion, and you can't expect your boys and girls 
to be content to wait for the K.H.S.A.A. 
prosram to open aorain in the fall. They need 
activity in June, Julv and August. 

One community's answer to wholesome 
STX)rts activities for kids came tndav when 
mv telephone rang and Colonel Bill Durham 
of Bardstown was on the wire. "Dutchman," 
said Colonel Durham, "Bardstown is now 




The Dutchman 

ready for a full program of recreation and 
we need a qualified director of recreation. 
Do you know one whom you will recom- 
mend ?" Here's an opportunity for majors in 
the field of recreation graduating from Ken- 
tucky's universities this spring. It's a cinch 
that many other communities in Kentucky 
will launch similar programs. In case your 
community wants to start a summer recrea- 
tion program and doesn't know how, just 
contact the department head of recreation 
in the college or university nearest you and 
you'll get help. A famous Judge once told me 
that many boys join gangs because they 
don't have opportunities to join teams. 

Assistant Commissioner Joe Billy Mans- 
field must exercise long range planning to do 
the tough job he does so well. In early April 
a letter from the far-sighted one said, 
"Dutchman, let's have your itinerary now for 
your October basketball clinics." This means 
Edgar McNabb got the same directive for 
his football clinics. This is long range plan- 
ning by the Commissioner's office, and it's 
A-O.K. 

Memo to Owensboro's Bob Daniels with 
copies to John Bunn, Cliff Faean, Doc Run- 
yon. Les Ansorge and Lvle Ouinn from the 

Dutchman That 1 957 Pontiac which 

made nine clinic trios and transported you 
gentlemen who produced "This is Basket- 
ball" over the Indiana highways is no more. 
"TVie Tio-er of the Highwavs" came to a fiery 
end when it burned in downtown Louisville 
and on the morninsr of the K.H.S.A.A. sports 
dinner. At each clinic "The Tiger" was a con- 
versation piece. What'll you guys talk about 
now? 

Each year as this last column is written 
I wonder if anv were successes. Maybe 
you're wondering if vou succeeded this year! 
Ralph Waldo Emerson set up a standard for 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



Page Nine 



HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL BOYS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION-1966 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Lukens, Houp, Crooks, Gravitt, King, Smith, Klausing. Second Row: Messmer, Voige, Miller, 
Grover, Wright, Mackey, Redd. Koenig, Phister, Ass't. Coach Tom Jones. Third Row: Coach Lawson. Ader, Jones, Grimm, 
Sarring, Haalick, Whiting, Arbogast, Wilson, Hogel, Eratz. Fourth Row: Downtree, Scharstein, Bezold, Fosdick, Rice, 
Reik, Welf, Ross, Hunter, Kennedy. 



success and the Dutchman passes it on to 
you: 

"To laugh often and much ; to win the 
respect of intelligent people and the affec- 
tion of children ; to earn the appreciation of 
honest critics and endure the betrayal of 
false friends ; to appreciate beauty, to find 
the best in others; to leave the world a bit 
better, whether by a healthy child, a garden 
patch, or a redeemed social condition; to 
know even one life has breathed easier be- 
cause you lived. This is to have succeeded." 

National Collegiate Championships 

The NCAA Track and Field Championships are 
scheduled to be held on Indiana University's new Track 
facility June 16-18, 1966. The Championships have not 
been held in the Midwest for several years, with the 
result that many Track enthusiasts living in the centrail 
section of the United States hav? not had the oppor- 
tunity to see in action the world's greatest track stars. 

"Ticket prices are as follows: 

June 16 (2:30 P.M.), June 17 (3:30 P.M.)— General 
Admission, $1.50; Knothole Club (high school students 
or under), $1.00. 

June 18 (11:30 A.M.)— Reserved Seats, $3.00; Gener- 
al Admission, $2.00; Knothole Club, $1.00. 

Tickets can be secured by communicating with the 
Indiana University Ticket Office, Bloomington, Indiana. 



1966 TRACK QUESTIONS 

(Continued from April ATOLETE) 

18. Situation: In the 880-yard relay, A2 falls while 
negotiating a curve. In the confusion that follows, 
B2, who is running in a line outside that occupied by 
A2, is spiked on his right leg. There are several minor 
officials at the turn and the chief inspector's view is 
blocked, so that he has no way of knowing who is 
responsible for the contact. Officials in the immediate 
area agree that the contact was not intentional. In 
the absence of any facts to warrant the disqualifica- 
tion of any contestant, the referee orders the race 
re-run. All teams which competed in the first race are 
to participate in the substitute race. One or more of 
the teams refuse to take part in the substitute race. 

Ruling: The referee has authortiy to make the 
decision indicated. This is covered in Rule 7-2. If the 
referee orders a substitute race, all teams are obligat- 
ed to participate if they desire a chance to earn 
points for the event. Obviously, in such situations, 
the referee must exercise good judgment. 

19. Situation: A competitor in the running long 
jump is not wearing shoes. He takes off from behind 
the scratch line at one side of the board. 

Ruling: Legal. There is nothing in the rules pro- 
hibiting this. They specify only that the contestsint 
shall take-off from behind the scratch line, or the 
scratch-line extended. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



20. Situation: The first runner of a relay team 
commits two false starts. 

Ruling: The relay team is disqualified. 

21. Situation: Al, in taking his position at the start 
of a relay race, allows the baton in this hand to be 
touching the ground on or in front of the starting line. 

Ruling: Illegal. When the starter notices the ir- 
regularity, he shall instruct the contestant to assume 
a legal starting position. 

22. Situation: In the running long jump, Al takes 
off legally from the takeoff board, but he lands 
outside the landing pit. 

Ruling: Legal. The attempt shall be measured 
perpendicularly to the scratch line extended from 
the point on the ground touched by the person or his 
apparel, which is nearest the scratch hne extended. 

23. Situation: Vaulter Al, at the end of his run-up, 
places his pole in the box to vault, but does not 
leave the ground nor does any part of his body pass 
under the crossbar or beyond the stop-board. 

Ruling: This is not a trial and shaU not be charged 
against the competitor. 



New Publications 

Athletic Institute and AAHPER Book 

The new edition of tlie PLANNING FACILnTES 
GUIDE, the result of a National Workshop on Areas 
and Facilities in Health, Physical Education and Rec- 
reation, held at the Indiana Memorial Union, Indiana 
University, Bloomington, Indiana, January 15-24, 1965, 
and co-sponsored by The Athletic Institute and the 
American Association for Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation has just come off the press. 

This guide, the composite thinking of over 60 par- 
ticipants at the national workshop from the fields of 
health, physical education and recreation as well as 
architects, engineers and city planners, will contain 
the most up-to-date and comprehensive information on 
planning facilities in the above areas. The 300-page 
guide will contain much more information, more 
figures, pictures and tables than the previous editions 
of the FACrLITIES GUIDE. 

A list of the chapters and their contents includes: 
Objectives and Needs, Planning Principles and Units, 
Outdoor Areas and Facilities, Outdoor Education (Rec- 
reation Areas and Facilities), General Features 
(Outdoor Facilities), Indoor Facilities for Elementary 
and Secondary School, Indoor Facilities for Col- 
leges and Universities, Recreation Buildings, General 
Building Features, Design Characteristics of Swimming 
Pools, The Indoor Pool, Outdoor Pools, Water Treat- 
ment and Filtration, Swimming Pool Equipment and 
Accessories, Waterfronts and Beaches, Health Educa- 
tion, Safety Education, Cnecklist for Facilities Plan- 
ners. 

The paperback edition of the new guide wUl sell 
for $5.00 per copy and the hard-cover edition is priced 
at $6.00. Check or money order with your institutional 
purchase order should be sent to the Athletic Institute, 
805 Merchandise Mart, (3iicago, Illinois 60654. 

Teamwork 

A new book, TEAMWORK BETWEEN THE 
COACH AND THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR, writ- 
ten by J. H. Griffin, has recently come from the School 
Aid (Company, Danville, Illinois. It is weU written, and 
should be a fine addition to the library of the coach. 
The chapter headings are as follows: 

1. Considerations before entering the coaching field 

2. Securing a position 

3. Getting off to a good start with your admini- 
strator 



4. Areas of possible friction points with school 
personnel 

5. Adjusting to a new community 

6. Twenty-six ways to help yourself and your ad- 
ministrator 

7. Cautions to be observed with your lady friends 

8. The influence of the coach on the youth of the 
community 

9. Handling pubUcity and the press 

10. Hints for helping athletics fit into the adminis- 
trative plan 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Two) 
District 11 to Basketball District 17. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Upon recommendation of the Commissioner, Oran 
C. Teater moved, seconded by Morton Combs, that 
the insurance subsidy for eadi member school for 
1966-67 be a basic amount of $40.00, with an additional 
subsidy of $60.00 for each school maintaining football. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Preston Hol- 
land, that the Commissioner be directed to sign a two- 
year contract with the Kentucky State Fair Board for 
the rental of Freedom Hall in 1967 and 1968 as the site 
of the State High School Basketball Tournament. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that he had received 
several inquiries recently concerning the possibility of 
Gymnastics being sponsored as an official K.H.S.A.A. 
intersoholastic sport. He stated that severed member 
schools of the Association currently have teams in 
gymnastics. Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that the Commissioner be directed to send 
out a questionnaire to the principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools in an effort to determine whether or 
not there is now enough interest in Gymnastics to 
warrant (the Association including this sport in its 
interscholastic program. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner presented a request from Prin. 
Fred Murray of the Madisonville High School concern- 
ing the moving of Madisonville to another football 
district in which most of the teams involved are cur- 
rently on the Madisonville schedule. Sherman Gish 
moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, that the Madi- 
sonville High School be moved from Region 1, District 
2, to Region 1, District 1, in Class AA football. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Don Davis, that 
Ralph C. Dorsey and Morton Combs be named dele- 
gate and alternate respectively to the forthcoming 
summer meeting of the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Preston Hol- 
land, that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning March 1, 1966, and ending March 31, 1966, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that he had asked repre- 
sentatives of the Central High School (Louisville) to 
meet with him at 2:00 P.M. for a hearing in connection 
with a possible violation of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17 on 
March 12, 1966, by representatives of the school; and 
that he wished to conduct the hearing with members 
of the Board present. He further stated that, in the 
event an appeal from his decision should be taken, the 
Board would have heard the evidence presented, and 
would be in a position to make its decision. The Board 
acceded to his request. 

The Central High School hearing convened at 2:15. 
Present at the hearing were the Commissioner, tlie 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



Page Eleven 



Assistant Commissioner, and all members of the Board 
of Control; Prin. J. W. Hackett and Mr. Perry, a tea- 
cher, of the Central High School; Assistant Superintend- 
ent Robert L. Sanders of the IjOuisviUe City Board of 
Education; and Mr. Harry S. McAlpin. 

The Commissioner asked Assistant Commissioner 
J. B. Mansfield to present certain signed statements 
which he had accumulated in connection with the case, 
including statements made by Tournament Manager 
Arthur Moody and the principals of the four schools 
which had teams in the regional tournament final ses- 
sion held at Freedom Hall, Louisville, on the evening 
of March 12, 1966. After the statements were read by 
Mr. Mansfield, the Commissioner explained the impli- 
cations of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, Practice of Sports- 
manship, and the four Central High School representa- 
tives mentioned previously made statements concerning 
their knowledge of certain incidents which happened 
on March 12. After a general discussion period, the 
Commissioner ruled that the Central High School, in his 
opinion, was guilty of violating K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17 
on the evening of March 12, 1966; and that the follow- 
ing penalty should be imposed: 1) The Central High 
School shall be placed on probation for a period of 
two years from date, and 2) The Central High 
School sihall be suspended from the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association for the forthcoming month 
of December. 

The Commissioner asked Mr. Hackett if he wished 
to appeal the decision. The Central representatives 
retired from the room for a short period of time. After 
they returned, Mr. Hackett stated that he did wish to 
make an appeal from the decision of the Commissioner. 

President Sanders asked Vice-President Preston 
HollEind to conduct the appeal hearing. Mr. Holland 
complied with this request, asking individual members 
of the Board of Control to ask any questions and make 
any statements which had a bearing on the case. He 
also asked iVIr. Hackett and members of the Central 
group to give any reason for their belief that the pen- 
alty imposed by the Commissioner was too severe. All 
members of the two groups complied with this request. 

At the conclusion of the appeal hearing, the Central 
representatives retired. The Commissioner stated that, 
in the Ught of some of the statements made during the 
appeal hearing, he would recommend that the Board 
consider reducing the penalty. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the Board of Control sustain the position of the 
Commissioner in declaring that the Central High School 
had been guilty of violating K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, 
Practice of Sportsmanship, on the evening of March 12, 
1966; and that the school be placed on probation for a 
period of two years from date. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

. There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



HARRISON COUNTY WINNERS 



K.H.S.C.A. 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

Coach EstiU Branham (Warren County) games 
director of the All-Star games presented Charlie Kuhn 
(Male) the retiring president of the Coaches Associa- 
tion a plaque in recognition of the valuable leadership 
provided by Kuhn over a three year period. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed at 2:45 p.m. 

Members of the Executive Committee present were: 
President, James BazzeH, Allen County; Vice Presi- 
dent, Fred Qayton, Caldwell County; Sec.-Treas., Joe 
Ohr, Irvine; Sgt.-at-Arms, Don Morris, Breckinridge 
County; Retiring President, Charlie Kuhn, Male; 
Games Director, Estill Branham, Warren County. 




Cheerleaders of the Harrison County High School 
won first place in the K.A.P.O.S. contest during the 
1966 State High School Basketball Tournament. IMem- 
bers of the group in the picture above are: (Left to 
Right) Front Row — Nancy Juett, Anne Haviland; 
Second Row — Mrs. Juliann Tesar, Beverly Midden, 
Mary Lowdenback, Karen Williams, Bonnie Urfer, Mrs. 
Macky Bell. 



Reports of Audit 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 12, 1966 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky Higli School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

At the request of Mr. Joe Ohr, your Secretary, I have 
made an examination of the records of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association as furnished to me by Mr. Ohr. 
The period involved is March 8. 1965 thru February 26, 1966. 

All transactions during this period are shown on the 
attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. All receipts 
have been traced in to the Bank Account and all disburse- 
ments have been verified by cancelled checks. 

The balance of $10 094.65 has been confirmed as beiner on 
deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company. Irvine, Ken- 
tucky, on February 26, 1966. 

Yours very truly, 
William Sexton, Jr., Auditor 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPITS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 
THE PERIOD MARCH S, 1965 TO FEBRUARY 26, 1966. 
Bank Balance in Union Bank & Trust Company. 

Irvine, Kentucky, on March 8, 1965 $ 8,606.72 

Receipts : 

Membership Dues i 1,629.00 

Refund from Edd Kellow — 373.98 

Grant from KHSAA 500.00 

Total Receipts 2,602.98 

GRAND TOTAL $11,109.70 

Disbursements : 

Irvine Postmaster — 

500 stamps 25.00 

Mrs. Naomi Sheckler — 

Sec. help 10.00 

Bob Wright — 

All star meetings, mileage 31.35 

Fred Clayton — Meetings 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1966 



& mileage 21.50 

Sexton Ins. Agency — Andit 20.00 

Irvine Florist— 

Sanford's father 13.83 

Sports Center — 

Coach of Year Awards 97.85 

Secretary of State — 

FiUng fee 2.00 

Sexton Ins. Agency — 

Surety Bond 31.25 

Bill Harrell— Clinic Speaker .__ 50.00 
Denzil Halbert— 

Clinic Spealier 50.00 

Don Morris — Clinic Speaker 50.00 

Charlie Eahn — Clinic Speaker 50.00 

Fred Clayton — Mileage, 

Exec. Meetings 49.70 

James Bazzell — Mileage 

& Exec, meetings 46.00 

Jack Hall — Clinic Speaker 50.00 

Owen Hanck— Clinic Speaker __ 50.00 

Joe Ohr— AU Star expenses .__ 29.55 
Estill Branham — Director 

of Clinic 300.00 

Don Morris — All Star 

meeting expense 10,30 

Irvine Postmaster— Stamps 25.00 

Bank Charge for 

printed checks 1.72 

Total Disbnrsements 1,015.05 

BALANCE ON FEBRUARY 26, 1966 $10,094.65 

Balance in Bank per 

Bank Statement of 2-26-66 $10,094.65 



Irvine, Eentacky 
April 12, 1966 
Executive Committee 

East-West All Star Football & Basketball Games 
of Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

Per Mr. Joe Ohr's request, I have made an examination 
of the records of the All Star account as furnished to me 
by Mr. Ohr, and covering the period March 18, 1965 to Febru- 
ary 14, 1966. 

Consolidated and classified receipts and disbnrsements are 
shown on the attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. 
The bank balance of $33,690.38 has been confirmed as being 
on deposit in the First Security National Bank and Trust 
Company, Lexington. Kentucky. 

Total cash receipts of $8,774.70 have been traced into the 
bank and the total disbnrsements of $8,312.97 have been 
properly substantiated by canceled checks. 

In our report of April 6, 1965, we reported your balance 
in Account No. 9315 in the Columbia Federal Savings & 
Loan Association, Covington, Kentucky, as $4,548.93 as of 
March 31, 1965. We did net make any verification of this 
account in this report. 

We ^ believe the attached schedule properly reflects all 
transactions for the period covered. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Wm. Sexton, Jr., Auditor 

EAST-WEST ALL STAB FOOTBALL AND BASKETBALL 
GAMES OF THE 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOE 
THE PERIOD MARCH 18, 1965 TO FEBRUARY 14, 1966. 
Receipts: 

Receipts from All Star Games $ 8,690.60 

Receipts from Programs 84.10 

Total Receipts 8,774.70 

Plus: Balance in Bank on March 18, 1965 33,228.65 

CRAND TOTAL $42,003.35 

Disbursements: 

Printing 305.37 

Player Awards & Trophies 690.93 

Coaches Salaries 1,000.00 

Manager's Salary 500.00 

Misc. Medical Expenses 45.60 

Manager's Expenses 153.92 

Microphone Rental 25.00 

Transportation 837.80 

Charge for All Star Games 1,200.00 

Grant to "Tiny" Jones Fund „ 200.00 

Grant to Charles Morris Fund _ 200.00 
Travel Expenses 

Manager (Misc.) 161.85 

Insurance 243.80 

Meals for All SUrs 2,326.24 

Kentucky Sales Tax 240.91 

Ambulance Service 20.00 



Federal Taxes 161.55 

Total Expenditures 8,312.97 

Balance on February 14, 1966 $33,690.38 

Balance on deposit in First Security National 
Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, Kentucky, 
per Bank Statement of February 14, 1966 $33,690.38 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASEBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled JMay 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If we 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bell, Leonard Route #2, Hodgenville, 358-3195 (Bus.) 

Booker, James M., Brownsville, Ky., 597-2628, 749-2666 

Brock. Lavone E.. Stoney Fork. 337-3271, 337-3271 

Cappel, William F., 822 Perry St., Covington, 431-0232, 721-8070 

Carter. Phillip Ray, Whitley City, 376-2517 

Cassaday, Clifton Eugene, 331 Mac Brae, Louisville, 367-1233 

Clardy, Barry, Boute #2, Box 188C, Greenville, 338-3510, 

338-3036 
Clark. James K., 4139 Scott St., Louisville. 458-3906 
Collier. John, SPO 221, Asbury College, Wilmore. 858-9151 
Crager, Bobby F., S. L. Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-3682, 886- 

Culp, Willard, 318 Skyline Park, Hopkinsvlile 
Dieterle, Owen M., Box 135, Millersburg, 484-2076, 252-2076 
Duerson, William R.. Route #2, Paint Lick, 925-2357, 792-2459 
Duvall, James W., Central Hall, Box 802-B, WKSC, Bowling 

Green, 745-3260 
Earle. Herschel, Route #2. Berry, 234-5842 
Estep, Bobby, Fuget, 265-2701 
Farris, Reuben L., Box 135. Owingsville 

Goemmer, Darrell, 9809 Ovlandia, Jeffersontown, 267-5097 
Handley, Sam, Route #1, Hodgenville. 358-3195 (Bus.) 
Harper. Robie Beechmont, 476-8084. 476-2630 
Helton, Charles. 923 Lydia. Louisville 

Hinton, Noah Spears, Jr., P. O. Box 2473, Pikeville, 437-4427 
Huff. Ray, 4025 Lupine Court, Louisville, 368-0267 
Ingraham. Gary, 9706 Lanesboro Way, Louisville, 425-5215, 

897-2815 
Jacobs. Robert L., 3320 Lexington Rd., Louisville, TW 6-6082 
Johnson, James M., 174 Pinehurst, Frankfort, 223-2822, 223- 

8359 
Martin, Roger K., Box 174, Park City. 749-8425, 749-2860 
McKinney, Adelle, 6421 C Mulvaney, Fort Knox, 4-5860. 4-4658 
Metzger, Don, 9312 Cloverwood, Fern Creek, 464-7511 ext. 

4624 (Bus.) 
Morgan, Richard, Route #6, Box 64, London, 864-6511, 864- 

2181 
Pence, William JeriT, 1311 State St., Bowling Green, 862-4517, 

843-9907 
Prather, Edwin E.. Route #2, LaGrange. 279-5153, 246-8491 
Raines, J. W., 1117 Lebanon Road, Danville, 236-3380 
Robbins, Michael, 778 Jimae, 356-2209 
Roller, Otis, 808 Chambery, Louisville, 895-6356, 587-1121 ext. 

219 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370. 548-2208 
Smith. Willard N., 904 Rose Crest, Box 23, Campbellsville, 

465-5339. 465-4191 
Snedegar. Earl, Coyle St., Owingsville 
St. Amour, Patrick L., 4806-D Lee Village, Ft. Campbell, 

439-4454, 798-5413 
Thomas, Bill, 3418 Burrell Drive, Louisville, 447-7621 (Bus.) 
Thomas, Patrick H., Box 43, Leitchfield, 259-3010 
Treadway, Billy Thomas, 203 Heady Rd., Louisville, 895-8917, 

Bowling Green 745-2162 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123 
Washer, Jamie Don, 607 South 7th St.. 763-5330, 753-5313 
Way, James, 211 W. Penn., Cynthiana, 234-2361, 234-4393 
Williams. Mickey, P. O. Box 754. Somerset, 678-8848 
Wren, Bethel, Route #2, Paint Lick, 792-2751 



USTFF CHAMPIONSHIPS 

The fourth Annual USTFF Championships will be 
held at Terre Haute, Indiana, on June 10-11, 1966. Elig- 
ible for this meet are all athletes certified to be 
amateurs by school authorities or by USTFF registra- 
tion card. Also recognized as amateurs are holders of 
AAU registration cards. The entry deadline is June 4. 
All high schol athletes who have finished their eligibili- 
ty should enter this meet "unattached" or represent a 
club. For further details, Meet Director Bob Meyne 
should be contacted. His address is: Indiana State 
University, Terre Haute, Indiana — Phone C-6311, Area 
Code 812. 



ANNOUNCING FOR 1966-67 

The Same Excellent 
Student Accident Coverage 

$8,000 MAXIMUM 

PLUS: Optional 24 Hour Plan 

For Students And Faculty 

PLUS: Cooperative or Regular 
Football Plan 

PLUS: Our Pledge To Continue 
To Provide Service And 
To Take A Personal Interest 
In Your Needs 



^Ue> KUufJUn Qo^nfMHif 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 

P. O. BOX 7100 LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 255-0837 



Order Your Football Equipment Now 
For Early August Delivery 

PLACE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE 

We will be very happy to accept your order now for any football 
equipment, as well as basketball equipment. Shipment will be made at the 
earliest possible moment and October 1, 1966 dating will be extended. We 
have nationally advertised brands — complete team equipment, so let us 
take care of your needs. We'll be glad to be of service, whether you need 
complete team equipment or just a few special items. 

We can also make immediate shipment on any Spring merchandise 
you might need. 

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR SUMMER 
PLAYGROUND PROGRAMS 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation pro- 
gram, we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves 
in Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our 
salesmen will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance 
you may need. 

If you need personal vacation equipment, remember that we have a 
complete stock of golf and fishing supplies, so let us hear from you. 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

We ShipThe DaVVou BuV* 








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